Catalogue


Reimagining politics after the Terror [electronic resource] : the republican origins of French liberalism /
Andrew Jainchill.
imprint
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2008.
description
xii, 317 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801446694 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780801446696 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2008.
isbn
0801446694 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780801446696 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The Constitution of the Year III -- The post-Terror discourse of moeurs -- Liberal republicanism during the directory -- A republican empire? : debate on expansion, 1794-99 -- Liberal authoritarianism and the Constitution of the Year VIII -- Liberal republicanism and dissent against Bonaparte -- Epilogue : the fate of French liberal republicanism.
catalogue key
8845880
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Wallace K. Ferguson Award, CAN, 2009 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-11-01:
The French Revolution's post-Terror period has recently attracted the attention of insightful scholars. Jainchill (Queen's Univ.) has joined Howard G. Brown (Ending the French Revolution, CH, Jul'07, 44-4645) in the revisionist camp; in fact, Jainchill's study can be considered complementary. While Brown focused primarily on policies and their results, Jainchill examines in depth the political theories discussed and debated by moderate republicans who, unfortunately, were never able to create a united front. Most of the intellectuals interested in developing a stable republic were inspired by classical Greek and Roman models. However, there were some who maintained that these ideals were irrelevant for a modern commercial state. Utilizing an impressive array of sources, Jainchill records and analyzes the philosophical arguments, such as the one regarding the concept of liberty, for which no consensus was reached. As a result of the Directory's many failings, critics led by Director Sieyes proposed a theory of liberal authoritarianism that would reduce the people's role in politics, paving the way for Bonaparte's dictatorship. When Napoleon's regime sanctioned legal abuses, it was challenged by republicans on the Left like Stael and Constant, two of the major architects of modern French liberalism. Mature students and scholars will appreciate this thought-provoking, well-written monograph. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. T. M. Keefe Saint Joseph's University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Andrew Jainchill poses an historical problem with contemporary overtones. After his pathbreaking work, the decade between Thermidor and the establishment of the Empire will no longer be a political black hole during which bourgeois interests ran wild. The classical republican theories that had animated the revolutionaries did not disappear; private interest did not replace public spirit. Jainchill illustrates the emergence of a modern 'liberal republicanism' that recognizes that liberalism can no more survive without republicanism than republicanism can ignore the principles of liberalism. Jainchill's careful historical reconstruction will interest political theorists who are not primarily specialists in the French revolution. Although Jainchill does not mention it directly, it is tempting to ask whether his liberal republicanism does not offer hints for dealing with our own recent experience."-Dick Howard, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Stony Brook University, author of The Specter of Democracy
"Reimagining Politics after the Terror is a splendid, sophisticated, and important contribution to the historiography of eighteenth-century France, and to our understanding of the origins of modern political thought. Andrew Jainchill marvelously illuminates the history of the late revolutionary period in France and the origins of modern liberalism."-David A. Bell, Dean of Faculty and Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, The Johns Hopkins University
"This extraordinary book shatters the scholarly myth that the rise of modern liberalism took place on the ruins of classical republicanism. Instead, liberalism arose as a far-reaching transformation within republicanism. Andrew Jainchill unearths these liberal beginnings in France not simply by focusing on canonical figures and high texts, though the masterful readings are there. Most important, he provides a compellingly rich contextualization of the political moment after the revolutionary terror that sparked the invention of liberalism from republican sources. The disquieting features of the transformation, including the implications for domestic security and foreign policy, are not neglected. Theoretically incisive and methodologically convincing, Reimagining Politics after the Terror is a landmark work."-Samuel Moyn, Columbia University, author of Origins of the Other
"This is an excellent book. Andrew Jainchill convincingly argues that one cannot properly understand French Liberalism without understanding the specific problems and crises out of which it emerged, and without also appreciating the strange persistence of classical republicanism in the 'mental toolkit' of the period's intellectual elites. Paying equal attention to political concepts and political reality, Jainchill offers a richly nuanced portrait of the post-Terror period in French history and a fresh rereading of some of its major thinkers. This well-written and informative book should find a wide readership, and I recommend it highly."-Helena Rosenblatt, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
In the wake of the Terror, France's political and intellectual elites set out to refound the Republic and, in so doing, reimagined the nature of the political order. They argued vigorously over imperial expansion, constitutional power, personal liberty, and public morality. In Reimagining Politics after the Terror, Andrew Jainchill rewrites the history of the origins of French liberalism by telling the story of France's underappreciated "republican moment" during the tumultuous years between 1794 and Napoleon's declaration of a new French Empire in 1804. Examining a wide range of political and theoretical debates, Jainchill offers a compelling reinterpretation of the political culture of post-Terror France and of the establishment of Napoleon's Consulate. He also provides new readings of works by the key architects of early French liberalism, including Germaine de Staƫl, Benjamin Constant, and, in the epilogue, Alexis de Tocqueville. The political culture of the post-Terror period was decisively shaped by the classical republican tradition of the early modern Atlantic world and, as Jainchill persuasively argues, constituted France's "Machiavellian Moment." Out of this moment, a distinctly French version of liberalism began to take shape. Reimagining Politics after the Terror is essential reading for anyone concerned with the history of political thought, the origins and nature of French liberalism, and the end of the French Revolution.
Main Description
In the wake of the Terror, France's political and intellectual elites set out to refound the Republic and, in so doing, reimagined the nature of the political order. They argued vigorously over imperial expansion, constitutional power, personal liberty, and public morality. In Reimagining Politics after the Terror, Andrew Jainchill rewrites the history of the origins of French Liberalism by telling the story of France's underappreciated "republican moment" during the tumultuous years between 1794 and Napoleon's declaration of a new French Empire in 1804. Examining a wide range of political and theoretical debates, Jainchill offers a compelling reinterpretation of the political culture of post-Terror France and of the establishment of Napoleon's Consulate. He also provides new readings of works by the key architects of early French Liberalism, including Germaine de Sta l, Benjamin Constant, and, in the epilogue, Alexis de Tocqueville. The political culture of the post-Terror period was decisively shaped by the classical republican tradition of the early modern Atlantic world and, as Jainchill persuasively argues, constituted France's "Machiavellian Moment." Out of this moment, a distinctly French version of liberalism began to take shape. Reimagining Politics after the Terror is essential reading for anyone concerned with the history of political thought, the origins and nature of French Liberalism, and the end of the French Revolution.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Note on Translations and Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Constitution of the Year IIIp. 26
The Post-Terror Discourse of Moeursp. 62
Liberal Republicanism during the Directoryp. 108
A Republican Empire? Debate on Expansion, 1794-99p. 141
Liberal Authoritarianism and the Constitution of the Year VIIIp. 197
Liberal Republicanism and Dissent against Bonapartep. 243
Epilogue: The Fate of French Liberal Republicanismp. 287
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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