Catalogue


Peter's war [electronic resource] : a New England slave boy and the American Revolution /
Joyce Lee Malcolm.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
description
xi, 253 p. : ill., map, plan ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0300119305 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780300119305 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
0300119305 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780300119305 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"A Caravan book"--T.p. verso.
catalogue key
8844761
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-241) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-01-01:
Malcolm (law, George Mason Univ.) vividly recounts the Revolutionary War experiences of slaves such as Peter Nelson, who at age 12 enlisted in the Massachusetts militia and participated in some of the war's most famous battles. Malcolm's deep research, including into primary sources, sheds light on slaves' wartime involvement, chronicling the stories of men who bravely and willingly fought alongside free whites not knowing whether their efforts toward victory would result in their own eventual freedom. Malcolm describes in grim and poignant detail the vastly different wartime experiences of three slaves-Peter; his father, Jupiter; and unrelated Southern slave Titus, who joined the British army and engaged in guerrilla warfare against American slaves and their owners. Using the three slaves' stories as a narrative fulcrum, Malcolm provides a succinct but satisfying overview of the entire war. Major historical figures such as George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and John Adams play key roles in this narrative, but the author's focus is on the unknown and forgotten participants. She has assembled an engagingly written and incisive book, valuable to both scholars and informed general readers. Recommended for history collections in academic and large public libraries.-Douglas King, Univ. of South Carolina, Thomas Cooper Lib., Columbia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"From the fogs of war and hidden records, Joyce Malcolm has retrieved this amazing story of slavery and freedom in the midst of the American Revolution. With graceful, old-fashioned narrative style, Malcolm tells the story of Peter, an African American youth whose footprints traversed many battlefronts of the Revolution. Peter''s voice is illusive, but his life left many traces. He saw and fought the war, returned to his Massachusetts home, lived and worked as a farmer, and died far too young. This book is a marvelous example of what can be learned from heretofore unknown people, and a beautifully-told tale about the ugliest underside of American history."-David W. Blight, author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation
"In clear, engaging language, Malcolm reconstructs the surroundings, relationships and political atmosphere of the Revolution. . . . Malcolm seamlessly captures the intersection of personal, political and military strategy. History buffs will revel in Peter''s never-before-told story, which makes a vivid addition to Revolutionary War literature." Kirkus Reviews
"In clear, engaging language, Malcolm reconstructs the surroundings, relationships and political atmosphere of the Revolution. . . . Malcolm seamlessly captures the intersection of personal, political and military strategy. History buffs will revel in Peter's never-before-told story, which makes a vivid addition to Revolutionary War literature."�Kirkus Reviews
"In this deeply researched and generously wrought book, Joyce Lee Malcolm penetrates the past's shadows and helps us recover the life of an American boy relegated to obscurity-until now."-Wilfred M. McClay, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
"In this deeply researched and generously wrought book, Joyce Lee Malcolm penetrates the past's shadows and helps us recover the life of an American boy relegated to obscurityuntil now."Wilfred M. McClay, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
�In this deeply researched and generously wrought book, Joyce Lee Malcolm penetrates the past�s shadows and helps us recover the life of an American boy relegated to obscurity�until now.��Wilfred M. McClay, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
"In this deeply researched and generously wrought book, Joyce Malcolm penetrates the past's shadows and helps us recover the life of an American boy relegated to obscurity-until now."-Wilfred M. McClay, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
"A well-written and important contribution to our understanding of the black experience during the Revolution."-Edward Rugemer, Yale University
"A well-written and important contribution to our understanding of the black experience during the Revolution."�Edward Rugemer, Yale University
"A well-written and important contribution to our understanding of the black experience during the Revolution."Edward Rugemer, Yale University
"From the fogs of war and hidden records, Joyce Lee Malcolm has retrieved this amazing story of slavery and freedom in the midst of the American Revolution. With graceful, old-fashioned narrative style, Malcolm tells the story of Peter, an African American youth whose footprints traversed many battlefronts of the Revolution. Peter''s voice is elusive, but his life left many traces. He saw and fought the war, returned to his Massachusetts home, lived and worked as a farmer, and died far too young. This book is a marvelous example of what can be learned from heretofore unknown people, and a beautifully-told tale about the ugliest underside of American history."-David W. Blight, author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation
"In clear, engaging language, Malcolm reconstructs the surroundings, relationships and political atmosphere of the Revolution. . . . Malcolm seamlessly captures the intersection of personal, political and military strategy. History buffs will revel in Peter''s never-before-told story, which makes a vivid addition to Revolutionary War literature."-Kirkus Reviews
"From the fogs of war and hidden records, Joyce Lee Malcolm has retrieved this amazing story of slavery and freedom in the midst of the American Revolution. With graceful, old-fashioned narrative style, Malcolm tells the story of Peter, an African American youth whose footprints traversed many battlefronts of the Revolution. Peter''s voice is elusive, but his life left many traces. He saw and fought the war, returned to his Massachusetts home, lived and worked as a farmer, and died far too young. This book is a marvelous example of what can be learned from heretofore unknown people, and a beautifully-told tale about the ugliest underside of American history."David W. Blight, author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation
�From the fogs of war and hidden records, Joyce Lee Malcolm has retrieved this amazing story of slavery and freedom in the midst of the American Revolution. With graceful, old-fashioned narrative style, Malcolm tells the story of Peter, an African American youth whose footprints traversed many battlefronts of the Revolution. Peter's voice is elusive, but his life left many traces. He saw and fought the war, returned to his Massachusetts home, lived and worked as a farmer, and died far too young. This book is a marvelous example of what can be learned from heretofore unknown people, and a beautifully-told tale about the ugliest underside of American history.��David W. Blight, author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, January 2009
Boston Globe, May 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A boy named Peter, born to a slave in Massachussetts in 1763, was sold 19 months later to a childless white couple there. This book recounts the history of how the American Revolution came to Peter's small town, how he joined the revolutionary army at the age of 12, and how he participated in the battles of Bunker Hill and Yorktown.
Main Description
A boy named Peter, born to a slave in Massachusetts in 1763, was sold nineteen months later to a childless white couple there. This book recounts the fascinating history of how the American Revolution came to Peter's small town, how he joined the revolutionary army at the age of twelve, and how he participated in the battles of Bunker Hill and Yorktown and witnessed the surrender at Saratoga. Joyce Lee Malcolm describes Peter's home life in rural New England, which became increasingly unhappy as he grew aware of racial differences and prejudices. She then relates how he and other blacks, slave and free, joined the war to achieve their own independence. Malcolm juxtaposes Peter's life in the patriot armies with that of the life of Titus, a New Jersey slave who fled to the British in 1775 and reemerged as a feared guerrilla leader. A remarkable feat of investigation, Peter's biography illuminates many themes in American history: race relations in New England, the prelude to and military history of the Revolutionary War, and the varied experience of black soldiers who fought on both sides.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
The Hardship Salep. 1
Growing Painsp. 11
The Four Horsemenp. 25
In the Crosshairsp. 41
The Killingp. 58
Answering the Callp. 74
Another Call, Another Answerp. 87
Home Fires and Campfiresp. 95
The Ethiopian Regimentp. 109
A Motherless Childp. 118
Getting Back, Getting Evenp. 134
The Year of Possibilitiesp. 144
Trials and Tribulationsp. 163
An Eye for an Eyep. 175
Free at Lastp. 183
The Winter Soldierp. 195
Final Battlesp. 211
Afterwordp. 226
Essay on Sourcesp. 235
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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