Catalogue


Neonatal intensive care nursing [electronic resource] /
edited by Glenys Boxwell.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2000.
description
xxix, 455 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0415203392
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2000.
isbn
0415203392
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8844023
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Every reader in the field of neonatal nursing care will welcome this reader-friendly text because it relates, for the first time in UK nursing literature, the research evidence to practice in this specialty.' Barabara Weller, Editor, Journal of Neonatal Nursing 'Neonatal nurses everywhere will find the information practical and easy to utilise. The approach reflects the way neonatal nursing is developing universally, with care taken to base practice on evidence,' - Shelley Reid, Editor, Neonatal Paediatric and Child Health Nursing
'With its emphasis on linking evidence-based theory to the daily practice of neonatal intensive care nursing, [this book] makes valuable and relevant reading for all those involved in nursing sick neonates, and therefore comes highly reccommended.' - Nurse Education Today
This item was reviewed in:
Doody's Reviews, January 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A comprehensive text for experienced nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies. It should enable nurses to recognise, rationalize and remedy problems using both a multi-systems and an evidence-based approach.
Main Description
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Back Cover Copy
Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing is a comprehensive, evidence-based text for experienced neonatal nurses, paediatric nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies. Written largely by and for nurses, it concentrates on the common problems occurring within the neonatal intensive care unit. This user-friendly text will enable nurses to recognise, rationalise and remedy these problems using both a multi-systems and an evidence-based approach. It will be essential reading for experienced nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies within the intensive care area of the neonatal unit and also for nurses undertaking qualifications in the specialism of neonatal nursing. Features of Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing : clearly written by practising neonatal nurses and teachers well sign-posted and user-friendly with a glossary of terms includes case studies and exercises to promote critical thinking and decision-making contains a wealth of evidence to suppport nursing procedures and practice
Back Cover Copy
Neonatal Intensive Care Nursingis an information-packed, evidence-based text for experienced neonatal nurses, paediatric nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies. Clearly written by practising neonatal nurses and teachers, it concentrates on the common problems occurring within the neonatal intensive care unit, enabling nurses to recognise, rationalise and remedy these problems using both a multi-systems and an evidence-based approach. In addition, the text includes case studies and exercises to promote critical thinking and decision-making, and allowing nurses to link knowledge to practice.User-friendly and well sign-posted with a glossary of terms, this text is essential reading for nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies within the intensive care area of the neonatal unit and also for nurses undertaking qualifications in neonatal nursing.
Back Cover Copy
Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing is an information-packed, evidence-based text for experienced neonatal nurses, paediatric nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies. Clearly written by practising neonatal nurses and teachers, it concentrates on the common problems occurring within the neonatal intensive care unit, enabling nurses to recognise, rationalise and remedy these problems using both a multi-systems and an evidence-based approach. In addition, the text includes case studies and exercises to promote critical thinking and decision-making, and allowing nurses to link knowledge to practice.User-friendly and well sign-posted with a glossary of terms, this text is essential reading for nurses and midwives caring for sick newborn babies within the intensive care area of the neonatal unit and also for nurses undertaking qualifications in neonatal nursing.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. xii
List of tablesp. xiv
Notes on contributorsp. xv
Prefacep. xix
Acknowledgementsp. xxii
Abbreviationsp. xxiii
Glossaryp. xxvi
Advanced neonatal nursing practicep. 1
Introductionp. 2
Factors influencing the development of the neonatal nurse rolep. 2
The developmental history of the Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner rolep. 4
Legal aspects of advanced neonatal nursing practicep. 5
Potential areas in neonatal care for advancing neonatal nursing practicep. 6
Evidence-based neonatal carep. 7
Conclusionp. 10
Referencesp. 10
Developmentally focused nursing carep. 14
Introductionp. 15
Theories on developmentally focused carep. 15
Behavioural assessmentp. 19
Sleep-wake statesp. 21
Behaviourp. 24
The NICU environmentp. 24
Noise hazardp. 26
Light hazardp. 26
Handlingp. 28
Contingent carep. 28
Postural supportp. 30
Equipmentp. 32
Prone positionp. 32
Supine positionp. 33
Side-lying positionp. 34
Developmental models of carep. 34
Conclusionp. 38
Referencesp. 38
Resuscitation of the newbornp. 43
Introductionp. 44
Asphyxiap. 44
Anticipationp. 46
ABC(D and E) of resuscitationp. 47
Airwayp. 48
Breathingp. 48
Circulationp. 50
Drugsp. 51
Meconium stained liquorp. 56
Evaluation of resuscitationp. 57
Conclusionp. 58
Case studyp. 59
Referencesp. 59
Management of thermal stabilityp. 64
Introductionp. 65
Embryologyp. 65
Mechanisms of heat gainp. 66
Vasoconstrictionp. 66
Thermal receptorsp. 66
Non-shivering thermogenesisp. 67
Thermoneutralityp. 69
Mechanisms of heat lossp. 70
Conductionp. 70
Convectionp. 70
Radiationp. 70
Evaporationp. 71
Heat exchanged through the respiratory tractp. 71
Surface areap. 71
Immature skinp. 71
Transepidermal water loss (TEWL)p. 72
Respiratory water lossp. 73
Thermal instabilityp. 73
Hypothermiap. 73
Cold stressp. 74
Neonatal cold injuryp. 74
Re-warming in severe hypothermiap. 75
Hyperthermiap. 76
Management of thermal stability at deliveryp. 76
The healthy infantp. 76
Delivery by cesarean sectionp. 77
The asphyxiated infantp. 77
Meconium stained liquorp. 77
The low birth weight infantp. 77
Management of thermal stability in the NICUp. 79
Radiant warmersp. 79
Incubatorsp. 80
Radiant warmers vs incubatorsp. 81
Humidityp. 81
Skinp. 83
Heated water-filled mattressesp. 83
Thermal status during transportp. 84
Temperature measurementp. 85
Continuous monitoringp. 85
Intermittent temperature recordingsp. 86
Localised hypothermia following birth asphyxiap. 86
Conclusionp. 87
Case studyp. 88
Referencesp. 89
Management of respiratory disordersp. 96
Introductionp. 97
The development of the respiratory systemp. 97
Respiration in the neonatep. 100
Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS)p. 101
Pneumoniap. 103
Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS)p. 104
Pneumothoraxp. 106
Pulmonary haemorrhagep. 107
Acid base balancep. 108
Respiratory supportp. 113
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)p. 113
Positive-pressure ventilationp. 114
High frequency ventilation (HFV)p. 119
High frequency jet ventilation (HFJV)p. 119
High frequency flow interrpution (HFFI)p. 119
High frequency oscillation (HFO)p. 120
Negative extrathoracic pressurep. 121
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)p. 121
Nitric oxide (NO)p. 122
Liquid ventilationp. 123
Conclusionp. 123
Case studyp. 124
Referencesp. 124
Cardiovascular managementp. 129
Introductionp. 130
Cardiac embryologyp. 130
Development of the heartp. 130
Formation of the four chambers of the heartp. 132
The endocardial cushionsp. 132
The atriap. 132
The ventriclesp. 132
Formation of the aortic and pulmonary trunksp. 133
The fetal circulationp. 133
Transition from fetal to neonatal circulationp. 136
Cardiac functionp. 137
The cardiac cyclep. 137
Blood pressurep. 137
Regulation of blood pressurep. 138
The management of blood pressurep. 138
Congenital heart defectsp. 139
Patent ductus arteriosusp. 140
Transposition of the great arteriesp. 141
Hypoplastic left heart syndromep. 142
Coarctation of the aortap. 143
Congestive heart failurep. 144
Nursing managementp. 145
Clinical assessmentp. 145
Physical examinationp. 145
Evaluation of the pulses, peripheral perfusion and blood pressurep. 146
Palpation of the chest wall and the liverp. 147
Auscultationp. 147
Care planp. 147
Family supportp. 148
Case studyp. 149
Referencesp. 149
Brain injury in the premature infantp. 152
Introduction: the vulnerability of the premature infant brainp. 153
Subependymal germinal matrixp. 153
Periventricular vascular anatomic factorsp. 153
Alterations to cerebral blood flowp. 154
Hypoxic-ischaemic reperfusion injuryp. 154
Risk factors for brain injuryp. 154
Periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage (PIVH)p. 156
Clinical featuresp. 156
Parenchymal haemorrhagic infarctionp. 157
Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL)p. 157
Managementp. 158
Prevention of brain injury in the premature infantp. 158
Pharmacological interventionsp. 159
Acute managementp. 159
Post-haemorrhagic ventricular dilatationp. 159
Nursing managementp. 160
The outcome of brain injury in the premature infantp. 160
Periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhagep. 160
Parenchymal haemorrhagic infarctionp. 161
Periventricular leukomalaciap. 161
Case studyp. 161
Referencesp. 162
Haematological problemsp. 164
Introductionp. 165
Jaundice in the newbornp. 165
Physiology of bilirubin productionp. 165
Bilirubin metabolism and excretionp. 165
Predisposing factors to physiological jaundice in the newbornp. 167
Other causes of jaundicep. 167
Rhesus incompatibilityp. 167
ABO incompatibilityp. 169
G6PD deficiencyp. 169
Breast feedingp. 170
Management of jaundicep. 170
Investigation of jaundicep. 171
Phenobarbitonep. 172
Intravenous albuminp. 172
Metalloporphyrinsp. 172
Phototherapyp. 173
Exchange transfusionp. 175
Kernicterus (bilirubin encephalopathy)p. 177
Haemorrhagic disease of the newborn/vitamin K deficient bleedingp. 177
Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)p. 180
Signs of DICp. 180
Managementp. 181
Anaemiap. 181
Top-up transfusionsp. 183
Iron supplementationp. 184
Recombinant erythropoietinp. 184
Conclusionp. 184
Case studiesp. 184
Referencesp. 185
Pain and comfort in neonatal intensive carep. 188
Introductionp. 189
Theory of painp. 190
Infant response to pain and distressp. 191
Chemical responsesp. 192
Behavioural responsep. 192
Physiological responsep. 194
Assessment of pain in a non-verbal client groupp. 194
Pain assessment toolsp. 195
Potential consequences of untreated painp. 198
Relief strategiesp. 199
Non-pharmacological measuresp. 199
Pharmacological measuresp. 201
Conclusionp. 205
Case studiesp. 206
Referencesp. 207
Fluid and electrolyte balancep. 211
Introductionp. 212
Embryological developmentp. 212
Physiology of urine productionp. 212
Sodium balancep. 213
Hyponatraemiap. 214
Hypernatraemiap. 215
Potassium balancep. 215
Hypokalaemiap. 216
Hyperkalaemiap. 216
Chloride balancep. 216
Calcium and phosphate balancep. 217
Water managementp. 217
Fluid requirementsp. 218
Monitoring fluid balancep. 218
Glucose homeostasisp. 220
Renal handling of glucosep. 220
Hypoglycaemiap. 221
Hyperglycaemiap. 223
Acute renal failurep. 224
Investigationsp. 224
Managementp. 225
Dialysisp. 226
Peritoneal dialysisp. 226
Continuous haemofiltrationp. 228
Conclusionp. 229
Case studiesp. 229
Referencesp. 231
Nutritional management of the infant in the NICUp. 234
Introductionp. 235
The gastrointestinal systemp. 236
Outcomes of nutritionp. 238
Growthp. 239
Assessmentp. 240
Feeding the NICU infantp. 241
Requirementsp. 242
Parenteral nutritionp. 243
Enteral nutritionp. 244
Methodsp. 245
Specific problems in the NICUp. 248
Family supportp. 249
Conclusionp. 251
Case studiesp. 251
Further readingp. 254
Referencesp. 254
Neonatal infectionp. 259
Introductionp. 260
Acquisition of antenatal infectionp. 260
Acquisition of intrapartum infectionp. 262
Late onset and nosocomial infectionp. 263
The susceptible hostp. 264
Signs of neonatal sepsisp. 268
Respiratory signsp. 268
Thermal signsp. 269
Cardiovascular signsp. 269
Skin signsp. 269
Abdominal signsp. 270
Neurological signsp. 270
Investigationsp. 270
Surface swabs and site culturesp. 270
Haematological testsp. 272
Cerebrospinal fluidp. 273
Urinep. 273
Management of the infected newbornp. 274
General supportive therapyp. 274
Antimicrobial therapyp. 276
Adjunctive therapiesp. 279
Conclusionp. 279
Case studyp. 280
Referencesp. 280
Diagnostic and therapeutic proceduresp. 285
Introductionp. 286
Gastric tube placementp. 286
Naso/orogastric tubep. 286
Transpyloric tubep. 287
Endotracheal tube placementp. 289
Chest drain placementp. 291
Blood samplingp. 294
Capillary blood samplingp. 294
Venous blood samplingp. 296
Arterial blood samplingp. 297
Peripheral vein cannulationp. 298
Peripheral artery cannulationp. 300
Peripheral venous longlinep. 301
Umbilical vessel catheterisationp. 303
Umbilical vein catheterisation (UVC)p. 303
Umbilical artery catheterisation (UAC)p. 305
Lumbar puncturep. 307
Urine sample collectionp. 309
Suprapubic aspirationp. 309
Case studiesp. 310
Referencesp. 314
Neonatal anaesthesiap. 316
Introductionp. 317
Preoperative assessmentp. 317
Problems of prematurity affecting anaesthesiap. 317
Associated congenital/chromosomal abnormalitiesp. 318
Familial anaesthetic problemsp. 320
Preoperative investigations and preparationp. 320
Investigationsp. 320
Preparationp. 321
Premedicationp. 321
Transfer to the operating theatrep. 322
The operating theatre environmentp. 322
Intraoperative managementp. 322
Induction of anaesthesiap. 322
Airway managementp. 323
Maintenance of anaesthesiap. 324
Emergence from anaesthesia and extubationp. 324
Analgesiap. 325
Opioidsp. 325
Paracetamolp. 326
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugsp. 326
Local anaesthesiap. 326
Fluid therapyp. 329
Maintenance fluidp. 329
Replacement of fluid lost by evaporation/sequestrationp. 329
Replacement of blood lossp. 330
Anaesthetic equipmentp. 330
Airway equipmentp. 330
Breathing systemsp. 332
Ventilatorsp. 334
Equipment for maintenance of body temperaturep. 334
Equipment for intravenous fluid administrationp. 335
Anaesthetic monitoringp. 335
Cardiovascular monitoringp. 335
Respiratory monitoringp. 336
Temperature monitoringp. 337
Postoperative carep. 337
Postoperative apnoeasp. 337
Post-extubation stridorp. 338
Respiratory insufficiencyp. 338
Assessing the need for postoperative ventilationp. 339
Conclusionp. 339
Case studyp. 340
Referencesp. 340
Surgical aspects of neonatal intensive care nursingp. 343
Introductionp. 344
General principles of managementp. 344
Thermoregulationp. 345
Respiratory functionp. 345
Gastric decompressionp. 345
Fluid and electrolyte balancep. 345
Pharmacological supportp. 347
Transportationp. 347
Postoperative considerationsp. 347
Most commonly encountered congenital disordersp. 347
Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF)p. 347
Case studyp. 351
Mechanical intestinal obstructionp. 352
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)p. 358
Abdominal wall defectsp. 362
Most commonly encountered acquired disordersp. 366
Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC)p. 366
Case studyp. 368
Spontaneous bowel perforationp. 368
Miscellaneous disordersp. 369
Cystic hygromap. 369
Teratomap. 370
Ovarian cystp. 370
Testicular torsionp. 371
Biliary atresiap. 371
Conclusionp. 372
Referencesp. 373
Neonatal transportp. 377
Introductionp. 378
The transport teamp. 378
Transport vehiclesp. 380
Hazards of transportationp. 380
Equipment required for transporting a sick neonatep. 382
At the referral unitp. 383
At the referring unitp. 384
The parentsp. 385
The return journeyp. 385
Back at the referral unitp. 386
Legalities involved with transporting a sick neonatep. 386
Conclusionp. 387
Referencesp. 387
Family supportp. 389
Introductionp. 390
Family support--a definitionp. 390
Family-centred carep. 390
The components of family supportp. 391
The caregiver groupp. 391
The recipient group--the infants and their familiesp. 392
The neonatal environmentp. 393
Strategies for providing family support in the neonatal settingp. 394
Supporting the family in the antenatal periodp. 394
Supporting the family during the admission periodp. 394
Being aware of the profound effects of separationp. 396
Supporting the family during the discharge preparation periodp. 397
Supporting the family of the dying infantp. 398
Basic principles of family supportp. 399
Working in partnership with parentsp. 399
Facilitating parents' attachment with their infantp. 403
Planning programmes of family supportp. 404
Conclusionp. 405
Case studiesp. 406
Referencesp. 409
Ethics and neonatal nursingp. 412
Introductionp. 413
Ethical theories: an overviewp. 413
Utilitarianism or consequentialismp. 413
Deontological or Kantian theoryp. 414
Virtue-based theoryp. 414
Rights-based theoryp. 414
Ethical principlesp. 415
Respect for autonomyp. 415
Non-maleficencep. 416
Beneficencep. 417
Justicep. 417
Fetal rightsp. 419
Respecting maternal autonomy: the giving of informed consentp. 420
Should fetal rights exist?p. 421
Ethics in practicep. 423
Case studyp. 424
Conclusionp. 426
Legal referencesp. 427
Referencesp. 427
Medication in the newbornp. 430
Introductionp. 431
Pharmacokineticsp. 431
Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)p. 436
Unlicensed medicinesp. 437
Drug administrationp. 438
Conclusionp. 439
Case studyp. 439
Referencesp. 440
Normal values in the neonatep. 443
Indexp. 445
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