Catalogue


The chronicle of Adam Usk, 1377-1421 /
edited and translated by C. Given-Wilson.
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
xciii, 290 p.
ISBN
0198204833 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0198204833 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
884316
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Given-Wilson's new edition and translation... combines a highly readable English version of the text with an extremely informative introduction, notes, and criticakl apparatus... begins with a fascinating account of Usk's life and career. Given-Wilson's discussion of the manuscript ismasterful.'J.S. Hamilton, Albion
'In this edition Professor Given-Wilson has done full justice to his subject. Offering several new perspectives on Usk's life he has provided an edition which is not only a pleasure to use, but fully lives up to the high standards set by his editorial predecessor, Sir Edward Maunde Thompson,almost a century ago.'John Taylor, History
'In this edition Professor Given-Wilson has done full justice to his subject. Offering several new perspectives on Usk's life he has provided an edition which is not only a pleasure to use, but fully lives up to the high standards set by his editorial predecessor, Sir Edward Maunde Thompson, almost a century ago.'John Taylor, History'Given-Wilson's new edition and translation... combines a highly readable English version of the text with an extremely informative introduction, notes, and criticakl apparatus... begins with a fascinating account of Usk's life and career. Given-Wilson's discussion of the manuscript is masterful.'J.S. Hamilton, Albion
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Adam Usk was born around the middle of the 14th century. Through the patronage of the Mortimer family - the earls of March - he studied law at Oxford. Later, he served King Henry IV of England, and was an eyewitness to the revolution of 1399.
Long Description
Adam Usk's chronicle, covering the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, is one of the most personal and idiosyncratic of medieval chronicles. It offers an eyewitness account of the fall of Richard II, the turbulent politics of Rome between 1402 and 1406, and the Glyn Dwr revolt. It is also a record of the remarkable life and career of an author who suffered exile and excommunication before finding peace in his last years.
Long Description
Adam Usk, the full details of whose remarkable life are here revealed for the first time, was born in Usk around the middle of the fourteenth century. Through the patronage of the Mortimer family - the earls of March - he studied law at Oxford, eventually rising to hold a chair in civil law there, before entering the service of Archbishop Arundel and, ultimately, of King Henry IV of England. He was an eye-witness to the revolution of 1399, but soon after this, having left England for Rome, he fell out with Henry IV and spent several years in exile, accused of collaborating with the Welsh rebel leader, Owain Glyn Dwr. Eventually, having returned to Wales secretly, he managed to gain a pardon from the king in 1411, and thus spent his remaining years, until his death in 1430, in relative peace. His chronicle, which is a first-hand source for the fall of Richard II, for the turbulent politics of Rome between 1402 and 1406, and for the Glyn Dwr revolt, also provides a fascinating insight - with its mixture of autobiography, political intrigue, and the supernatural - into the mind of a highly educated medieval author.
Main Description
Adam Usk, the full details of whose remarkable life are here revealed for the first time, was born in Usk around the middle of the fourteenth century. Through the patronage of the Mortimer family - the earls of March - he studied law at Oxford, eventually rising to hold a chair in civil lawthere, before entering the service of Archbishop Arundel and, ultimately, of King Henry IV of England. He was an eye-witness to the revolution of 1399, but soon after this, having left England for Rome, he fell out with Henry IV and spent several years in exile, accused of collaborating with theWelsh rebel leader, Owain Glyn Dwr. Eventually, having returned to Wales secretly, he managed to gain a pardon from the king in 1411, and thus spent his remaining years, until his death in 1430, in relative peace. His chronicle, which is a first-hand source for the fall of Richard II, for the turbulent politics of Rome between 1402 and 1406, and for the Glyn Dwr revolt, also provides a fascinating insight - with its mixture of autobiography, political intrigue, and the supernatural - into the mind of ahighly educated medieval author.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. xiii
Chronicon Ade Vskp. 2
Testamentum Ade Vskp. 272
Index of Quotations and Allusionsp. 277
General Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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