Catalogue


The last pharaohs [electronic resource] : Egypt under the Ptolemies, 305-30 BC /
J.G. Manning.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.
description
xvi, 264 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780691142623 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.
isbn
9780691142623 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Egypt in the first millennium BC -- The historical understanding of the Ptolemaic state -- Moving beyond despotism, economic planning, and state banditry : Ptolemaic Egypt as a premodern state -- Shaping a new state : the political economy of the Ptolemies -- Creating a new economic order : economic life and economic policy under the Ptolemies -- Order and law shaping the law in a new state -- Conclusions -- Appendix: The trial record of the property dispute held at the Temple of Wepwawet in Asyut, Upper Egypt, 170 BC, before the local laokritai-judges.
catalogue key
8842631
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This fascinating book has broad views that should appeal to many people who are neither specialists on ancient Egypt nor the ancient Greek world. J. G. Manning has a perfect knowledge of his subject."--Alain Bresson, University of Chicago"Most scholars who study Ptolemaic Egypt are specialists in either Greek or Egyptian demotic papyrology, work below the level of large-scale narrative, and write technical studies that are not always accessible to historians. And the evidence from Ptolemaic Egypt is often considered parochial since Egypt is thought of as unique in the ancient world. J. G. Manning's book answers all these problems. Leaving the niche of technical papyrology and showing convincingly why Ptolemaic Egypt is important for the study of state formation and the ancient economy, he approaches the period as a real historian and puts his subject in the context of current international scholarly debate.The Last Pharaohswill impress ancient historians in general, and should make the Ptolemaic state an important case study in the literature on authoritarian states and state formation."--Katelijn Vandorpe, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-07-01:
Following his study of land tenure and use in Hellenistic Egypt (Land and Power in Ptolemaic Egypt, 2003), Manning (Yale) presents a well-supported analysis of the formation of the Ptolemaic state in the fourth and third centuries BCE. Rejecting a top-down despotic model, Manning emphasizes that the Ptolemaic state was characterized by a two-way interaction between the Greek immigrants and the Egyptians, and between Greek and Egyptian traditional institutions. After his review of the historiography on Ptolemaic Egypt and a broad discussion of its premodern states, Manning examines how the Ptolemaic kings interacted and bargained with (rather than imposed upon) their subject population regarding politics, the economy, and law. To establish legitimacy and stabilize the state, the Ptolemies returned to a Pharaonic style of governance. Utilizing royal imagery, state buildings, and beneficence toward cults and temples, the kings ensured the loyalty and support of Egyptian priests, local elites, and officials. This book addresses the complexities of Ptolemaic governance, which demonstrated a balance between Pharaonic and Macedonian/Greek practices. Extensive bibliography. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. H. Chang Elon University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This fascinating book has broad views that should appeal to many people who are neither specialists on ancient Egypt nor the ancient Greek world. J. G. Manning has a perfect knowledge of his subject.
Most scholars who study Ptolemaic Egypt are specialists in either Greek or Egyptian demotic papyrology, work below the level of large-scale narrative, and write technical studies that are not always accessible to historians. And the evidence from Ptolemaic Egypt is often considered parochial since Egypt is thought of as unique in the ancient world. J. G. Manning's book answers all these problems. Leaving the niche of technical papyrology and showing convincingly why Ptolemaic Egypt is important for the study of state formation and the ancient economy, he approaches the period as a real historian and puts his subject in the context of current international scholarly debate.The Last Pharaohswill impress ancient historians in general, and should make the Ptolemaic state an important case study in the literature on authoritarian states and state formation.
Manning has produced a deep and meaningful study of the social and political relationships inherent in the Ptolemaic economy.
"Manning has produced a deep and meaningful study of the social and political relationships inherent in the Ptolemaic economy."-- Timothy Howe, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
Manning has produced a deep and meaningful study of the social and political relationships inherent in the Ptolemaic economy. -- Timothy Howe, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
Manning's book is one of the most thought-provoking studies on the Hellenistic world to have appeared for quite some time, and it will be essential reading for anyone concerned with this remarkable period.
"Manning's book is one of the most thought-provoking studies on the Hellenistic world to have appeared for quite some time, and it will be essential reading for anyone concerned with this remarkable period."-- John Ray, Times Literary Supplement
Manning's book is one of the most thought-provoking studies on the Hellenistic world to have appeared for quite some time, and it will be essential reading for anyone concerned with this remarkable period. -- John Ray, Times Literary Supplement
"This book, using latest archaeological technique combined with analysis of Ptolemaic documents, sets into a clear yet far ranging perspective the reality of Egypt in a 300 year span from the ancient to the Roman world."-- Stephen Cox Trust
Following his study of land tenure and use in Hellenistic Egypt, Manning presents a well-supported analysis of the formation of the Ptolemaic state in the fourth and third centuries BCE.
"Following his study of land tenure and use in Hellenistic Egypt, Manning presents a well-supported analysis of the formation of the Ptolemaic state in the fourth and third centuries BCE."-- Choice
Following his study of land tenure and use in Hellenistic Egypt, Manning presents a well-supported analysis of the formation of the Ptolemaic state in the fourth and third centuries BCE. -- Choice
Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatic picture of Egypt's last ancient state.
"Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatic picture of Egypt's last ancient state."-- Heritage Key
Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatic picture of Egypt's last ancient state. -- Heritage Key
Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history,The Last Pharaohsdraws a dramatic picture of Egypt's last ancient state. -- Heritage Key
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The history of Ptolemaic Egypt has usually been doubly isolated--separated both from the history of other Hellenistic states and the history of ancient Egypt.The Last Pharaohs, the first detailed history of Ptolemaic Egypt as a state, departs radically from previous studies by putting the Ptolemaic state firmly in the context of both Hellenistic and Egyptian history. More broadly still, J. G. Manning examines the Ptolemaic dynasty in the context of the study of authoritarian and premodern states, shifting the focus of study away from modern European nation-states and toward ancient Asian ones. By analyzing Ptolemaic reforms of Egyptian economic and legal structures,The Last Pharaohsgauges the impact of Ptolemaic rule on Egypt and the relationships that the Ptolemaic kings formed with Egyptian society. Manning argues that the Ptolemies sought to rule through--rather than over--Egyptian society. He tells how the Ptolemies, adopting a pharaonic model of governance, shaped Egyptian society and in turn were shaped by it. Neither fully Greek nor wholly Egyptian, the Ptolemaic state within its core Egyptian territory was a hybrid that departed from but did not break with Egyptian history. Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatically new picture of Egypt's last ancient state.
Main Description
The history of Ptolemaic Egypt has usually been doubly isolated--separated both from the history of other Hellenistic states and from the history of ancient Egypt.The Last Pharaohs, the first detailed history of Ptolemaic Egypt as a state, departs radically from previous studies by putting the Ptolemaic state firmly in the context of both Hellenistic and Egyptian history. More broadly still, J. G. Manning examines the Ptolemaic dynasty in the context of the study of authoritarian and premodern states, shifting the focus of study away from modern European nation-states and toward ancient Asian ones. By analyzing Ptolemaic reforms of Egyptian economic and legal structures,The Last Pharaohsgauges the impact of Ptolemaic rule on Egypt and the relationships that the Ptolemaic kings formed with Egyptian society. Manning argues that the Ptolemies sought to rule through--rather than over--Egyptian society. He tells how the Ptolemies, adopting a pharaonic model of governance, shaped Egyptian society and in turn were shaped by it. Neither fully Greek nor wholly Egyptian, the Ptolemaic state within its core Egyptian territory was a hybrid that departed from but did not break with Egyptian history. Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatically new picture of Egypt's last ancient state.
Main Description
The history of Ptolemaic Egypt has usually been doubly isolated--separated both from the history of other Hellenistic states and from the history of ancient Egypt. The Last Pharaohs , the first detailed history of Ptolemaic Egypt as a state, departs radically from previous studies by putting the Ptolemaic state firmly in the context of both Hellenistic and Egyptian history. More broadly still, J. G. Manning examines the Ptolemaic dynasty in the context of the study of authoritarian and premodern states, shifting the focus of study away from modern European nation-states and toward ancient Asian ones. By analyzing Ptolemaic reforms of Egyptian economic and legal structures, The Last Pharaohs gauges the impact of Ptolemaic rule on Egypt and the relationships that the Ptolemaic kings formed with Egyptian society. Manning argues that the Ptolemies sought to rule through--rather than over--Egyptian society. He tells how the Ptolemies, adopting a pharaonic model of governance, shaped Egyptian society and in turn were shaped by it. Neither fully Greek nor wholly Egyptian, the Ptolemaic state within its core Egyptian territory was a hybrid that departed from but did not break with Egyptian history. Integrating the latest research on archaeology, papyrology, theories of the state, and legal history, as well as Hellenistic and Egyptian history, The Last Pharaohs draws a dramatically new picture of Egypt's last ancient state.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contents of this book cover Egypt in the first millennium BC, the historical understanding of the Ptolemaic state, moving beyond despotism, economic planning and state banditry, shaping a new state, and much more.
Back Cover Copy
"This fascinating book has broad views that should appeal to many people who are neither specialists on ancient Egypt nor the ancient Greek world. J. G. Manning has a perfect knowledge of his subject."--Alain Bresson, University of Chicago "Most scholars who study Ptolemaic Egypt are specialists in either Greek or Egyptian demotic papyrology, work below the level of large-scale narrative, and write technical studies that are not always accessible to historians. And the evidence from Ptolemaic Egypt is often considered parochial since Egypt is thought of as unique in the ancient world. J. G. Manning's book answers all these problems. Leaving the niche of technical papyrology and showing convincingly why Ptolemaic Egypt is important for the study of state formation and the ancient economy, he approaches the period as a real historian and puts his subject in the context of current international scholarly debate. The Last Pharaohs will impress ancient historians in general, and should make the Ptolemaic state an important case study in the literature on authoritarian states and state formation."--Katelijn Vandorpe, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Back Cover Copy
"This fascinating book has broad views that should appeal to many people who are neither specialists on ancient Egypt nor the ancient Greek world. J. G. Manning has a perfect knowledge of his subject."-- Alain Bresson, University of Chicago "Most scholars who study Ptolemaic Egypt are specialists in either Greek or Egyptian demotic papyrology, work below the level of large-scale narrative, and write technical studies that are not always accessible to historians. And the evidence from Ptolemaic Egypt is often considered parochial since Egypt is thought of as unique in the ancient world. J. G. Manning's book answers all these problems. Leaving the niche of technical papyrology and showing convincingly why Ptolemaic Egypt is important for the study of state formation and the ancient economy, he approaches the period as a real historian and puts his subject in the context of current international scholarly debate. The Last Pharaohs will impress ancient historians in general, and should make the Ptolemaic state an important case study in the literature on authoritarian states and state formation."-- Katelijn Vandorpe, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Egypt in the First Millennium BCp. 19
The Historical Understanding of the Ptolemaic Statep. 29
Moving beyond Despotism, Economic Planning, and State Banditryp. 55
Ptolemaic Egypt as a Premodern State
Shaping a New Statep. 73
The Political Economy of the Ptolemies
Creating a New Economic Orderp. 117
Economic Life and Economic Policy under the Ptolemies
Order and Lawp. 165
Shaping the Law in a New State
Conclusionsp. 202
Appendixp. 207
The Trial Record of the Property Dispute Held at the Temple of Wepwawet in Asyut, Upper Egypt, 170 BC before the Local Laokritai-judges
Bibliographyp. 217
Indexp. 259
Index of Sourcesp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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