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The Jews and the nation [electronic resource] : revolution, emancipation, state formation, and the liberal paradigm in America and France /
Frederic Cople Jaher.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2002.
description
x, 295 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
069109649X
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2002.
isbn
069109649X
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8842386
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-284) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a finely delineated investigation of the dynamics of inclusiveness and differentiation, primarily in America and secondarily in France during the overlapping eras of their respective revolutions. Jaher seeks to regain a grand narrative perspective of American history through a comparison of two variants of nation-building. The fundamental thesis is robust, and the demonstration is arresting. . ."--Seymour Drescher, author ofThe Mighty ExperimentandFrom Slavery to Freedom
Flap Copy
"This is a finely delineated investigation of the dynamics of inclusiveness and differentiation, primarily in America and secondarily in France during the overlapping eras of their respective revolutions. Jaher seeks to regain a grand narrative perspective of American history through a comparison of two variants of nation-building. The fundamental thesis is robust, and the demonstration is arresting. . ."-- Seymour Drescher, author of The Mighty Experiment and From Slavery to Freedom
Flap Copy
"This is a finely delineated investigation of the dynamics of inclusiveness and differentiation, primarily in America and secondarily in France during the overlapping eras of their respective revolutions. Jaher seeks to regain a grand narrative perspective of American history through a comparison of two variants of nation-building. The fundamental thesis is robust, and the demonstration is arresting. . ."--Seymour Drescher, author of The Mighty Experiment and From Slavery to Freedom
Reviews
Review Quotes
[A] well-written and well-argued explanation of the way in which the fate of Jews expressed itself in France and the United States. This is a work of unimpeachable and imaginative scholarship.
"[A] well-written and well-argued explanation of the way in which the fate of Jews expressed itself in France and the United States. This is a work of unimpeachable and imaginative scholarship."-- Jerusalem Report
[A] well-written and well-argued explanation of the way in which the fate of Jews expressed itself in France and the United States. This is a work of unimpeachable and imaginative scholarship. -- Jerusalem Report
This is a thoughtful, original, and systematic comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France from the period of the American and French revolutions through the beginnings of the American republic and the Napoleonic era. . . . [A] signal contribution to American Jewish historiography and to American ethnic history in general.
"This is a thoughtful, original, and systematic comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France from the period of the American and French revolutions through the beginnings of the American republic and the Napoleonic era. . . . [A] signal contribution to American Jewish historiography and to American ethnic history in general."-- Robert Rockaway, Journal of American History
This is a thoughtful, original, and systematic comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France from the period of the American and French revolutions through the beginnings of the American republic and the Napoleonic era. . . . [A] signal contribution to American Jewish historiography and to American ethnic history in general. -- Robert Rockaway, Journal of American History
This is a finely delineated investigation of the dynamics of inclusiveness and differentiation, primarily in America and secondarily in France during the overlapping eras of their respective revolutions. Jaher seeks to regain a grand narrative perspective of American history through a comparison of two variants of nation-building. The fundamental thesis is robust, and the demonstration is arresting. . .
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France - specifically, from the two countries' revolutions through the American republic and the Napoleonic era (1775-1815). It argues that the liberal paradigm worked for American, but not French Jews.
Main Description
This book is the first systematic comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France--specifically, from the two countries' revolutions through the American republic and the Napoleonic era (1775-1815). Frederic Jaher develops a vehicle for a broader and uniquely rich analysis of French and American nation-building and political culture. He returns grand theory to historical scholarship by examining the Jewish encounter with state formation and Jewish acquisition of civic equality from the perspective of the "paradigm of liberal inclusiveness" as formulated by Alexis de Tocqueville and Louis Hartz. Jaher argues that the liberal paradigm worked for American Jews but that France's illiberal impulses hindered its Jewish population in acquiring full civic rights. He also explores the relevance of the Tocqueville-Hartz theory for other marginalized groups, particularly blacks and women in France and America. However, the experience of these groups suggests that the theory has its limits. A central issue of this penetrating study is whether a state with democratic-liberal pretensions (America) can better protect the rights of marginalized enclaves than can a state with authoritarian tendencies (France). The Tocqueville-Hartz thesis has become a major issue in political science, and this book marks the first time it has been tested in a historical study.The Jews and the Nationreturns a unifying theory to a discipline fragmented by microtopical scholarship.
Main Description
This book is the first systematic comparison of the civic integration of Jews in the United States and France--specifically, from the two countries' revolutions through the American republic and the Napoleonic era (1775-1815). Frederic Jaher develops a vehicle for a broader and uniquely rich analysis of French and American nation-building and political culture. He returns grand theory to historical scholarship by examining the Jewish encounter with state formation and Jewish acquisition of civic equality from the perspective of the "paradigm of liberal inclusiveness" as formulated by Alexis de Tocqueville and Louis Hartz. Jaher argues that the liberal paradigm worked for American Jews but that France's illiberal impulses hindered its Jewish population in acquiring full civic rights. He also explores the relevance of the Tocqueville-Hartz theory for other marginalized groups, particularly blacks and women in France and America. However, the experience of these groups suggests that the theory has its limits. A central issue of this penetrating study is whether a state with democratic-liberal pretensions (America) can better protect the rights of marginalized enclaves than can a state with authoritarian tendencies (France). The Tocqueville-Hartz thesis has become a major issue in political science, and this book marks the first time it has been tested in a historical study. The Jews and the Nation returns a unifying theory to a discipline fragmented by microtopical scholarship.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introductionp. 1
The Prospectp. 3
The Nationp. 33
The Accountp. 57
The French Experience I: The Revolution and Its Republicp. 59
The French Experience II: Napoleon and the First Empirep. 103
The American Experiencep. 138
Conclusionp. 173
The Argumentp. 175
The Outcomep. 220
Notesp. 239
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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