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Indians, missionaries, and merchants [electronic resource] : the legacy of colonial encounters on the California frontiers /
Kent G. Lightfoot.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
description
xvii, 338 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0520208242 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
isbn
0520208242 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Dimensions and consequences of colonial encounters -- Visions of pre-colonial native California -- Franciscan missions in Alta California -- Native agency in the Franciscan missions -- Russian merchants in California -- Native agency in the Ross Colony -- Missionary and mercantile colonies in California -- The aftermath -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
8841998
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-318) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a remarkable contribution by an extraordinary anthropologist."--David Hurst Thomas, author ofSkull Wars "A groundbreaking work that will be welcomed by both scholars and the general reader who wishes to understand the role of California's past in shaping its future."--Robert L. Hoover, Professor Emeritus, California Polytechnic State University "This is essential reading for every California historian and archaeologist and a superb choice for undergraduate classrooms. Lightfoot's authoritative account gives a long-silenced voice to the many Indians of California."--Jeanne E. Arnold, editor ofThe Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom
Flap Copy
"This is a remarkable contribution by an extraordinary anthropologist."--David Hurst Thomas, author of Skull Wars "A groundbreaking work that will be welcomed by both scholars and the general reader who wishes to understand the role of California's past in shaping its future."--Robert L. Hoover, Professor Emeritus, California Polytechnic State University "This is essential reading for every California historian and archaeologist and a superb choice for undergraduate classrooms. Lightfoot's authoritative account gives a long-silenced voice to the many Indians of California."--Jeanne E. Arnold, editor of The Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
Historical anthropologist Lightfoot (Univ. of California, Berkeley) accomplishes at least three things in this impressive book. First, he astutely synthesizes much of the scholarship on the Colonial encounter of California Indians with the Spanish Franciscans, 1769-1836. Second, he compares this material with his own important work on the lesser-known encounter of California Indians with Russian merchants, 1812-42. Third, he illuminates the contemporary as well as historical importance of differences in these transformative encounters by examining how the field of anthropology in early-20th-century California became wedded to interpreting Indians through a "tribelet" (village community) model. Most Mission Indian communities that descended from the encounter with Franciscan missionaries reshaped their identities out of massive relocation and group mixing. Since such groups do not fit a tribelet model, they have received fitful scholarly attention and minimal federal recognition as tribes. Native communities that descended from the encounter with Russian merchants were able to maintain more continuity with their traditional locales and political organization, fitting the "authentic" Indian model and more readily receiving academic attention and official legitimization. The book is concisely and lucidly written, with particularly helpful maps. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All California and Native American collections, upper-division undergraduates and above. D. F. Anderson Northwestern College (IA)
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Lightfoot . . . gives us an excellent history of cross-cultural influences in old California."-- Westerners International
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Lightfoot examines the interactions between Native American communities in California & the earliest colonial settlements, those of Russian pioneers & Franciscan missionaries. He compares the history of the different ventures & their legacies that still help define the political status of native people.
Long Description
California's earliest European colonists--Russian merchants and Spanish missionaries--depended heavily on Native Americans for labor to build and maintain their colonies, but they did so in very different ways. This richly detailed book brings together disparate skeins of the past--including little-known oral histories, native texts, ethnohistory, and archaeological excavations--to present a vivid new view of how native cultures fared under these two colonial systems. Kent Lightfoot's innovative work, which incorporates the holistic methods of historical anthropology, explores the surprising ramifications of these long-ago encounters for the present-day political status of native people in California. Lightfoot weaves the results of his own significant archaeological research at Fort Ross, a major Russian mercantile colony, into a cross-cultural comparison, showing how these two colonial ventures--one primarily mercantile and one primarily religious--contributed to the development of new kinds of native identities, social forms, and tribal relationships. His lively account includes personal anecdotes from the field and a provocative discussion of the role played by early ethnographers, such as Alfred Kroeber, in influencing which tribes would eventually receive federal recognition.Indians, Missionaries, and Merchantstakes a fascinating, yet troubling, look at California's past and its role in shaping the state today.
Main Description
California's earliest European colonists--Russian merchants and Spanish missionaries--depended heavily on Native Americans for labor to build and maintain their colonies, but they did so in very different ways. This richly detailed book brings together disparate skeins of the past--including little-known oral histories, native texts, ethnohistory, and archaeological excavations--to present a vivid new view of how native cultures fared under these two colonial systems. Kent Lightfoot's innovative work, which incorporates the holistic methods of historical anthropology, explores the surprising ramifications of these long-ago encounters for the present-day political status of native people in California. Lightfoot weaves the results of his own significant archaeological research at Fort Ross, a major Russian mercantile colony, into a cross-cultural comparison, showing how these two colonial ventures--one primarily mercantile and one primarily religious--contributed to the development of new kinds of native identities, social forms, and tribal relationships. His lively account includes personal anecdotes from the field and a provocative discussion of the role played by early ethnographers, such as Alfred Kroeber, in influencing which tribes would eventually receive federal recognition. Indians, Missionaries, and Merchantstakes a fascinating, yet troubling, look at California's past and its role in shaping the state today.
Short Annotation
An ethnohistorical and archaeological examination of the contrasting Native American colonial experience in California under Franciscan mission and Russian mercantile regimes, which had different impacts on Indian cultural integrity and eventual political recognition by the federal government.
Unpaid Annotation
"This is a remarkable contribution by an extraordinary anthropologist."--David Hurst Thomas, author of "Skull Wars ""A groundbreaking work that will be welcomed by both scholars and the general reader who wishes to understand the role of California's past in shaping its future."--Robert L. Hoover, Professor Emeritus, California Polytechnic State University "This is essential reading for every California historian and archaeologist and a superb choice for undergraduate classrooms. Lightfoot'a authoritative account gives a long-silenced voice to the many Indians of California."--Jeanne E. Arnold, editor of "The Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom"
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
Dimensions and Consequences of Colonial Encounters
Visions of Precolonial Native California
Franciscan Missions in Alta California
Native Agency in the Franciscan Missions
Russian Merchants in California
Native Agency in the Ross Colony
Missionary and Mercantile Colonies in California: The Implications
The Aftermath
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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