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The health care revolution [electronic resource] : from medical monopoly to market competition /
Carl F. Ameringer.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2008.
description
xv, 253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520254805 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520254800 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press ; New York : Milbank Memorial Fund, c2008.
isbn
0520254805 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520254800 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The professional regime -- Precursors of change -- The triumph of market theory -- The Federal Trade Commission takes the lead -- The AMA case -- A question of jurisdiction -- Drawing the line between clinical and business practices -- The quest for antitrust relief -- The demonization of managed care.
catalogue key
8841453
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-229) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"InThe Health Care Revolution, Carl Ameringer elucidates as no one else has done the central importance of antitrust regulation as health care policy in the United States since the 1970s, with an inside view into the activities of the Federal Trade Commission. An exciting, lucid, and ambitious book."--Rosemary A. Stevens, author ofThe Public- Private Health Care State "Carl Ameringer's penetrating scholarly vision permits him to see inside the medical and legal professions. The result is an authoritative monograph that will claim the attention of scholars and policymakers because it frames the modern history of medical care in new and important ways."--Edward D. Berkowitz, author ofSomething Happened: A Political and Cultural History of the Seventies
Flap Copy
"In "The Health Care Revolution," Carl Ameringer elucidates as no one else has done the central importance of antitrust regulation as health care policy in the United States since the 1970s, with an inside view into the activities of the Federal Trade Commission. An exciting, lucid, and ambitious book."--Rosemary A. Stevens, author of "The Public- Private Health Care State" "Carl Ameringer's penetrating scholarly vision permits him to see inside the medical and legal professions. The result is an authoritative monograph that will claim the attention of scholars and policymakers because it frames the modern history of medical care in new and important ways."--Edward D. Berkowitz, author of "Something Happened: A Political and Cultural History of the Seventies"
Flap Copy
"In The Health Care Revolution , Carl Ameringer elucidates as no one else has done the central importance of antitrust regulation as health care policy in the United States since the 1970s, with an inside view into the activities of the Federal Trade Commission. An exciting, lucid, and ambitious book."--Rosemary A. Stevens, author of The Public- Private Health Care State "Carl Ameringer's penetrating scholarly vision permits him to see inside the medical and legal professions. The result is an authoritative monograph that will claim the attention of scholars and policymakers because it frames the modern history of medical care in new and important ways."--Edward D. Berkowitz, author of Something Happened: A Political and Cultural History of the Seventies
Flap Copy
"In The Health Care Revolution,Carl Ameringer elucidates as no one else has done the central importance of antitrust regulation as health care policy in the United States since the 1970s, with an inside view into the activities of the Federal Trade Commission. An exciting, lucid and ambitious book.--Rosemary A. Stevens, DeWitt Wallace Distinguished Scholar, Weill Cornell Medical College, and author ofThe Public- Private Health Care State(2007). "Carl Ameringer's penetrating scholarly vision permits him to see inside the medical and legal professions. The result is an authoritative monograph that will claim the attention of scholars and policymakers because it frames the modern history of medical care in new and important ways."--Edward D. Berkowitz, Professor of History and Public Policy and Public Administration, George Washington University, author ofSomething Happened: A Political and Cultural History of the Seventies.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-12-01:
The US health care system experienced sweeping changes over the past three decades. Managed care in particular reshaped the organization and delivery of health care by transforming physicians and insurers from allies to adversaries. Ameringer (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.) contends this "health care revolution" ended the medical profession's monopoly over health policy. The emergence of a new pro-competition regime, he argues, was due to the efforts of market-oriented reformers within the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The discussion of the creation and staffing of the "health care shop" within the FTC during the 1970s is exhaustive, as Ameringer examines how the ideas of Chicago-school economists (e.g., Milton Friedman) and legal scholars (e.g., Clark Havighurst) shaped reformers' legal strategy. Ameringer also reviews the American Medical Association's opposition to the "corporate practice of medicine" in the mid-20th century and argues that its subsequent support of patients' rights legislation in the 1990s was a thinly disguised effort to "demonize" the managed care industry. Ameringer's analysis unpacks the significance of landmark administrative cases (e.g., the AMA case) and subsequent judicial decisions by federal courts. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. R. B. Hackey Providence College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Carl Ameringer traces the origins of the unique system of healthcare prevalent in the US, showing how administrative agencies, spurred on by Congress and the Supreme Court, changed the rules to end medical monopolies and usher in market-based healthcare.
Long Description
America's market-based health care system, unique among the nations of the world, is in large part the product of an obscure, yet profound, revolution that overthrew the medical monopoly in the late 1970s. In this lucid, balanced account, Carl F. Ameringer tells how this revolution came into being when the U.S. Supreme Court and Congress prompted the antitrust agencies of the federal government--the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department--to change the rules of the health care system. Ameringer lays out the key events that led up to this regime change; explores its broader social, political, and economic contexts; examines the views of both its proponents and opponents; and considers its current trajectory.
Main Description
America's market-based health care system, unique among the nations of the world, is in large part the product of an obscure, yet profound, revolution that overthrew the medical monopoly in the late 1970s. In this lucid, balanced account, Carl F. Ameringer tells how this revolution came into being when the U.S. Supreme Court and Congress prompted the antitrust agencies of the federal government--the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department-to change the rules of the health care system. No longer able to restrict competition, once-powerful medical societies soon gave way to HMOs and other corporate arrangements. Ameringer lays out the key events that lead up to this regime change; explores its broader social, political, and economic contexts; examines the views of both its proponents and opponents; and considers its current trajectory. Along the way, he explores questions about the acquisition, control, and loss of political and economic power in a book that provides an essential perspective on the politics and law behind health policy in the United States.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The Professional Regimep. 21
Precursors of Changep. 42
The Triumph of Market Theoryp. 59
The Federal Trade Commission Takes the Leadp. 78
The AMA Casep. 100
A Question of Jurisdictionp. 119
Drawing the Line between Clinical and Business Practicesp. 135
The Quest for Antitrust Reliefp. 155
The Demonization of Managed Carep. 173
Conclusionp. 196
Referencesp. 211
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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