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The geography of ethnic violence [electronic resource] : identity, interests, and the indivisibility of territory /
Monica Duffy Toft.
imprint
Princeton. N.J. : Princeton University Press, 2006.
description
xii, 226 p. : maps.
ISBN
0691123837
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton. N.J. : Princeton University Press, 2006.
isbn
0691123837
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8841055
 
Includes bibliography (p. [203]-218) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Monica Toft makes an important and convincing argument about the power of demographic forces on the chances for ethnic violence. Her statistical findings on the paucity of ethnic violence when urban or dispersed groups are involved are striking. By showing the power of simple structural constraints in the path that leads to ethnic violence, she presents a formidable challenge to those scholars who see ethnicity as constructed, fluid, and infinitely malleable. Her statistical tests and case studies represent an imaginative use of data, and will generate much debate."-- Roger Petersen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, author of Resistance and Rebellion "This very well organized and well-written book is unquestionably a significant contribution to the study of ethnopolitics and political conflict. It calls attention to the central importance of territoriality in our understanding of where and why separatist conflicts arise and, perhaps more importantly, it shows how contending conceptions of territory affect the dynamics and outcomes of such conflicts."-- Ted Robert Gurr, University of Maryland, author of Peoples Versus States
Flap Copy
"This very well organized and well-written book is unquestionably a significant contribution to the study of ethnopolitics and political conflict. It calls attention to the central importance of territoriality in our understanding of where and why separatist conflicts arise and, perhaps more importantly, it shows how contending conceptions of territory affect the dynamics and outcomes of such conflicts."--Ted Robert Gurr, University of Maryland, author of "Peoples Versus States"Monica Toft makes an important and convincing argument about the power of demographic forces on the chances for ethnic violence. Her statistical findings on the paucity of ethnic violence when urban or dispersed groups are involved are striking. By showing the power of simple structural constraints in the path that leads to ethnic violence, she presents a formidable challenge to those scholars who see ethnicity as constructed, fluid, and infinitely malleable. Her statistical tests and case studies represent an imaginative use of data, and will generate much debate."--Roger Petersen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, author of "Resistance and Rebellion
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
Toft (Harvard Univ.) argues for a shift in emphasis from leader-centered and "ancient hatreds" approaches to the study of state/ethnic group conflicts to a focus on territory and settlement patterns. She begins with a theory of "indivisible territory" to explain why some ethnic/state disputes escalate into violence while others end in accommodation--a state will not negotiate over autonomy or independence with an ethnic group if that will set a precedent for other secessionist movement, while ethnic groups will fight for territory that they perceive as part of their identity, i.e., with a loss of the "homeland" seen as a threat to the existence of the group identity. To test the theory, Toft examines four sets of ethnic group/state interactions: Russia-Tajikistan, Russia-Chechnya, Georgia-Abkhazia, and Georgia-Ajaria. Although Moscow's intervention complicates the Abkhazia case, which ended in conflict, Toft concludes that her theory explains why Georgia reached an accommodation with Ajars and Russia with Tajikistan, but not with Chechnya. Toft makes an important contribution to the literature. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers, undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers and policy makers. R. P. Peters University of Massachusetts at Boston
Reviews
Review Quotes
An important contribution to the literature on the origins of violent ethnic conflict. The author's explanation is compact, straightforward, and elegant.
"An important contribution to the literature on the origins of violent ethnic conflict. The author's explanation is compact, straightforward, and elegant."-- Spencer D. Bakich, Virginia Quarterly Review
An important contribution to the literature on the origins of violent ethnic conflict. The author's explanation is compact, straightforward, and elegant. -- Spencer D. Bakich, Virginia Quarterly Review
[T]he central argument is clear and the book is well written and interesting. . . . I recommend the book to scholars in sociology, international relations, comparative politics, and history who are interested in social conflict and comparative race, ethnicity, and nation.
ÝT¨he central argument is clear and the book is well written and interesting. . . . I recommend the book to scholars in sociology, international relations, comparative politics, and history who are interested in social conflict and comparative race, ethnicity, and nation. -- Robert M. Kunovich "American Journal of Sociology"
"[T]he central argument is clear and the book is well written and interesting. . . . I recommend the book to scholars in sociology, international relations, comparative politics, and history who are interested in social conflict and comparative race, ethnicity, and nation."-- Robert M. Kunovich, American Journal of Sociology
[T]he central argument is clear and the book is well written and interesting. . . . I recommend the book to scholars in sociology, international relations, comparative politics, and history who are interested in social conflict and comparative race, ethnicity, and nation. -- Robert M. Kunovich, American Journal of Sociology
Toft makes an important contribution to the literature.
"Toft makes an important contribution to the literature."-- Choice
Toft makes an important contribution to the literature. -- Choice
Toft proposes a useful theory and adduces convincing evidence on some of the key determinants of severe ethnic violence.
"Toft proposes a useful theory and adduces convincing evidence on some of the key determinants of severe ethnic violence."-- Stuart J. Kaufman, Perspectives on Politics
Toft proposes a useful theory and adduces convincing evidence on some of the key determinants of severe ethnic violence. -- Stuart J. Kaufman, Perspectives on Politics
Toft's book is well written and closely argued.
"Toft's book is well written and closely argued."-- Foreign Affairs
Toft's book is well written and closely argued. -- Foreign Affairs
Monica Toft makes an important and convincing argument about the power of demographic forces on the chances for ethnic violence. Her statistical findings on the paucity of ethnic violence when urban or dispersed groups are involved are striking. By showing the power of simple structural constraints in the path that leads to ethnic violence, she presents a formidable challenge to those scholars who see ethnicity as constructed, fluid, and infinitely malleable. Her statistical tests and case studies represent an imaginative use of data, and will generate much debate.
This very well organized and well-written book is unquestionably a significant contribution to the study of ethnopolitics and political conflict. It calls attention to the central importance of territoriality in our understanding of where and why separatist conflicts arise and, perhaps more importantly, it shows how contending conceptions of territory affect the dynamics and outcomes of such conflicts.
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Monica Toft makes an important and convincing argument about the power of demographic forces on the chances for ethnic violence. Her statistical findings on the paucity of ethnic violence when urban or dispersed groups are involved are striking. By showing the power of simple structural constraints in the path that leads to ethnic violence, she presents a formidable challenge to those scholars who see ethnicity as constructed, fluid, and infinitely malleable. Her statistical tests and case studies represent an imaginative use of data, and will generate much debate."--Roger Petersen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, author of "Resistance and Rebellion""This very well organized and well-written book is unquestionably a significant contribution to the study of ethnopolitics and political conflict. It calls attention to the central importance of territoriality in our understanding of where and why separatist conflicts arise and, perhaps more importantly, it shows how contending conceptions of territory affect the dynamics and outcomes of such conflicts."--Ted Robert Gurr, University of Maryland, author of "Peoples Versus States"
Back Cover Copy
"Monica Toft makes an important and convincing argument about the power of demographic forces on the chances for ethnic violence. Her statistical findings on the paucity of ethnic violence when urban or dispersed groups are involved are striking. By showing the power of simple structural constraints in the path that leads to ethnic violence, she presents a formidable challenge to those scholars who see ethnicity as constructed, fluid, and infinitely malleable. Her statistical tests and case studies represent an imaginative use of data, and will generate much debate."--Roger Petersen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, author of Resistance and Rebellion "This very well organized and well-written book is unquestionably a significant contribution to the study of ethnopolitics and political conflict. It calls attention to the central importance of territoriality in our understanding of where and why separatist conflicts arise and, perhaps more importantly, it shows how contending conceptions of territory affect the dynamics and outcomes of such conflicts."--Ted Robert Gurr, University of Maryland, author of Peoples Versus States
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text argues that only by understanding how legitimacy and power interact can we hope to learn why some ethnic conflicts turn violent while others do not. It introduces a theory of ethnic violence that offers an explanation of ethnic violence and terrorism as well civil and interstate war.
Main Description
The Geography of Ethnic Violence is the first among numerous distinguished books on ethnic violence to clarify the vital role of territory in explaining such conflict. Monica Toft introduces and tests a theory of ethnic violence, one that provides a compelling general explanation of not only most ethnic violence, civil wars, and terrorism but many interstate wars as well. This understanding can foster new policy initiatives with real potential to make ethnic violence either less likely or less destructive. It can also guide policymakers to solutions that endure. The book offers a distinctively powerful synthesis of comparative politics and international relations theories, as well as a striking blend of statistical and historical case study methodologies. By skillfully combining a statistical analysis of a large number of ethnic conflicts with a focused comparison of historical cases of ethnic violence and nonviolence--including four major conflicts in the former Soviet Union--it achieves a rare balance of general applicability and deep insight. Toft concludes that only by understanding how legitimacy and power interact can we hope to learn why some ethnic conflicts turn violent while others do not. Concentrated groups defending a self-defined homeland often fight to the death, while dispersed or urbanized groups almost never risk violence to redress their grievances. Clearly written and rigorously documented, this book represents a major contribution to an ongoing debate that spans a range of disciplines including international relations, comparative politics, sociology, and history.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
The Forgotten Meaning of Territoryp. 1
Indivisible Territory and Ethnic Warp. 17
Territory and Violence: A Statistical Assessmentp. 34
Russia and Tatarstanp. 45
Russia and Chechnyap. 64
Georgia and Abkhaziap. 87
Georgia and Ajariap. 107
Conclusionp. 127
Appendix Tablesp. 149
Notesp. 167
Referencesp. 203
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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