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From the New Deal to the New Right [electronic resource] : race and the southern origins of modern conservatism /
Joseph E. Lowndes.
imprint
New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, c2008.
description
xi, 208 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780300121834 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, c2008.
isbn
9780300121834 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8840917
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-198) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-11-01:
Lowndes (political science, Univ. of Oregon) focuses his study on the emergence of the South as a major force in the development of modern conservatism. Conventional interpretations of the evolution in the conservative movement that ultimately elected Ronald Reagan to the presidency focus on the backlash that developed in the 1960s against more liberal tendencies, which had become standard features of US government since the implementation of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. This book challenges that interpretation by arguing that the conservative movement began earlier, with an alliance of southern segregationists and northern conservatives that developed out of their mutual distrust of some New Deal innovations. Lowndes traces the development of that alliance through the states' rights Democratic revolt in 1948, Alabama Governor George Wallace's presidential campaigns, Barry Goldwater's unabashedly conservative presidential campaign in 1964, and the concerted effort by Republican Richard Nixon to capture the South for his party. This book will be an important addition to collections on US politics or the US South, and will be useful to readers seeking an understanding of the conservative influence in the modern US and especially in the modern Republican Party. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. J. P. Sanson Louisiana State University at Alexandria
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Evocative and analytical, this historical portrait shows how racial change in the South opened the door to conservative mobilization. Its powerful account of how a cross-regional alliance of white supremacists and business-oriented anti-New Dealers fundamentally reoriented American politics advances our understanding not just of pathways to the present, but of prospects for the future."-Ira Katznelson, author of When Affirmative Action Was White
"Evocative and analytical, this historical portrait shows how racial change in the South opened the door to conservative mobilization. Its powerful account of how a cross-regional alliance of white supremacists and business-oriented anti-New Dealers fundamentally reoriented American politics advances our understanding not just of pathways to the present, but of prospects for the future."Ira Katznelson, author ofWhen Affirmative Action Was White
"Evocative and analytical, this historical portrait shows how racial change in the South opened the door to conservative mobilization. Its powerful account of how a cross-regional alliance of white supremacists and business-oriented anti-New Dealers fundamentally reoriented American politics advances our understanding not just of pathways to the present, but of prospects for the future."�Ira Katznelson, author of When Affirmative Action Was White
"Evocative and analytical, this historical portrait shows how racial change in the South opened the door to conservative mobilization. Its powerful account of how a cross-regional alliance of white supremacists and business-oriented anti-New Dealers fundamentally reoriented American politics advances our understanding not just of pathways to the present, but of prospects for the future."Ira Katznelson, author of When Affirmative Action Was White
"In reconstructing the intellectual, ideological, cultural, and institutional histories of the New Right''s genesis and development, From the New Deal to the New Right challenges many conventional views about the movement''s origins and content. This is an important contribution to our understanding of the southern, and racialist, roots of modern conservatism and with its rich, interdisciplinary focus, provides a very useful model of what the systematic study of politics can be."-Adolph Reed Jr., University of Pennsylvania
"In reconstructing the intellectual, ideological, cultural, and institutional histories of the New Right''s genesis and development,From the New Deal to the New Rightchallenges many conventional views about the movement''s origins and content. This is an important contribution to our understanding of the southern, and racialist, roots of modern conservatism and with its rich, interdisciplinary focus, provides a very useful model of what the systematic study of politics can be."Adolph Reed Jr., University of Pennsylvania
"In reconstructing the intellectual, ideological, cultural, and institutional histories of the New Right''s genesis and development, From the New Deal to the New Right challenges many conventional views about the movement''s origins and content. This is an important contribution to our understanding of the southern, and racialist, roots of modern conservatism and with its rich, interdisciplinary focus, provides a very useful model of what the systematic study of politics can be."�Adolph Reed Jr., University of Pennsylvania
"In reconstructing the intellectual, ideological, cultural, and institutional histories of the New Right''s genesis and development, From the New Deal to the New Right challenges many conventional views about the movement''s origins and content. This is an important contribution to our understanding of the southern, and racialist, roots of modern conservatism and with its rich, interdisciplinary focus, provides a very useful model of what the systematic study of politics can be."Adolph Reed Jr., University of Pennsylvania
"In reconstructing the intellectual, ideological, cultural, and institutional histories of the New Right''s genesis and development, From the New Deal to the New Right challenges many conventional views about the movement''s origins and content. This is an important contribution to our understanding of the southern, and racialist, roots of modern conservatism and with its rich, interdisciplinary focus, provides a very useful model of what the systematic study of politics can be."-Adolph Reed Jr., University of Pennsylvania -- Adolph Reed Jr.
"This book brilliantly describes the ideology of American conservatism. A richly detailed analysis that helps illuminate the development, rise, and the discursive peculiarities of this political movement."-Anne Norton, author of Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire
"This book brilliantly describes the ideology of American conservatism. A richly detailed analysis that helps illuminate the development, rise, and the discursive peculiarities of this political movement."Anne Norton, author ofLeo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire
"This book brilliantly describes the ideology of American conservatism. A richly detailed analysis that helps illuminate the development, rise, and the discursive peculiarities of this political movement."�Anne Norton, author of Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire
"This book brilliantly describes the ideology of American conservatism. A richly detailed analysis that helps illuminate the development, rise, and the discursive peculiarities of this political movement."Anne Norton, author of Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly,
Choice, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The American South has played a big role in the emergence of contemporary conservatism. Its transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed as a recent occurence, but this book argues that rather than a natural response by alienated whites in the '60s, this shift has deeper roots.
Long Description
The role the South has played in contemporary conservatism is perhaps the most consequential political phenomenon of the second half of the twentieth century. The region's transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed as a recent occurrence, one that largely stems from a 1960s-era backlash against left-leaning social movements. But as Joseph Lowndes argues in this book, this rightward shift was not necessarily a natural response by alienated whites, but rather the result of the long-term development of an alliance between Southern segregationists and Northern conservatives, two groups who initially shared little beyond opposition to specific New Deal imperatives. Lowndes focuses his narrative on the formative period between the end of the Second World War and the Nixon years. By looking at the 1948 Dixiecrat Revolt, the presidential campaigns of George Wallace, and popular representations of the region, he shows the many ways in which the South changed during these decades. Lowndes traces how a new alliance began to emerge by further examining the pages of the "National Review" and Republican party-building efforts in the South during the campaigns of Eisenhower, Goldwater, and Nixon. The unique characteristics of American conservatism were forged in the crucible of race relations in the South, he argues, and his analysis of party-building efforts, national institutions, and the innovations of particular political actors provides a keen look into the ideology of modern conservatism and the Republican Party.
Main Description
The role the South has played in contemporary conservatism is perhaps the most consequential political phenomenon of the second half of the twentieth century. The region's transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed as a recent occurrence, one that largely stems from a 1960s-era backlash against left-leaning social movements. But as Joseph Lowndes argues in this book, this rightward shift was not necessarily a natural response by alienated whites, but rather the result of the long-term development of an alliance between Southern segregationists and Northern conservatives, two groups who initially shared little beyond opposition to specific New Deal imperatives. Lowndes focuses his narrative on the formative period between the end of the Second World War and the Nixon years. By looking at the 1948 Dixiecrat Revolt, the presidential campaigns of George Wallace, and popular representations of the region, he shows the many ways in which the South changed during these decades. Lowndes traces how a new alliance began to emerge by further examining the pages of theNational Reviewand Republican party-building efforts in the South during the campaigns of Eisenhower, Goldwater, and Nixon. The unique characteristics of American conservatism were forged in the crucible of race relations in the South, he argues, and his analysis of party-building efforts, national institutions, and the innovations of particular political actors provides a keen look into the ideology of modern conservatism and the Republican Party.
Main Description
The role the South has played in contemporary conservatism is perhaps the most consequential political phenomenon of the second half of the twentieth century. The region's transition from Democratic stronghold to Republican base has frequently been viewed as a recent occurrence, one that largely stems from a 1960s-era backlash against left-leaning social movements. But as Joseph Lowndes argues in this book, this rightward shift was not necessarily a natural response by alienated whites, but rather the result of the long-term development of an alliance between Southern segregationists and Northern conservatives, two groups who initially shared little beyond opposition to specific New Deal imperatives. Lowndes focuses his narrative on the formative period between the end of the Second World War and the Nixon years. By looking at the 1948 Dixiecrat Revolt, the presidential campaigns of George Wallace, and popular representations of the region, he shows the many ways in which the South changed during these decades. Lowndes traces how a new alliance began to emerge by further examining the pages of the National Review and Republican party-building efforts in the South during the campaigns of Eisenhower, Goldwater, and Nixon. The unique characteristics of American conservatism were forged in the crucible of race relations in the South, he argues, and his analysis of party-building efforts, national institutions, and the innovations of particular political actors provides a keen look into the ideology of modern conservatism and the Republican Party.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Beyond the Backlash Thesisp. 1
"White Supremacy Is a Political Doctrine": Charles Wallace Collins and the Dixiecrat Revolt of 1948p. 11
"Goldwater Was the Horsepower": National Review and the New Southern GOPp. 45
"You Are Southerners Too": The National Campaigns of George Wallacep. 77
"The South, the West, and Suburbia": Richard Nixon's New Majorityp. 106
"Guv'mints Lie": Asa Carter, Josey Wales, and the Southernization of Conservatism After Watergatep. 140
Between Political Order and Change: The Contingent Construction of the Modern Rightp. 155
Notesp. 163
Bibliographyp. 185
Indexp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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