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Creating wine [electronic resource] : the emergence of a world industry, 1840-1914 /
James Simpson.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2011.
description
xxxvii, 318 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691136033 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780691136035 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2011.
isbn
0691136033 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780691136035 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Pt. I. Technological and organizational change in Europe, 1840-1914. European wine on the eve of the railways -- Phylloxera and the development of scientific viti-viniculture -- Surviving success in the Midi : growers, merchants, and the state -- pt. II. The causes of export failure. Selling to reluctant drinkers : the British market and the international wine trade -- pt. III. Institutional innovation : regional appellations. Bordeaux -- Champagne -- Port -- From sherry to Spanish white -- pt. IV. The great divergence : the growth of industrial wine production in the New World. Big business and American wine : the California Wine Association -- Australia : the tyranny of distance and domestic beer drinkers -- Argentina : New World producers and Old World consumers -- Conclusion -- Appendix 1. Vineyards and wineries -- Appendix 2. Wine prices.
catalogue key
8839194
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-312) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
" Creating Wine draws on richly diverse primary sources from the New and Old World to explain how modern wine came into being during the first period of globalization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deftly written and immensely entertaining, it is hard to put down and is a must-read for anyone interested in the history or economics of wine and food. Bravo!"-- James T. Lapsley, author of Bottled Poetry: Napa Winemaking from Prohibition to the Modern Era "Conventional wine histories typically give us the chteau, the region, or the country. Simpsons ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."-- Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "Simpson fills a void in wine economics. We learn about environmental issues, overproduction, export crises, institutional responses, the eternal competition with beer, and the rise of wine production in the New World. All of this happened two hundred years ago, but the issues have not changed. This book has a lot to say and one learns a lot. A must-read for economists, historians, politicians, and wine lovers alike."-- Karl Storchmann, New York University and Journal of Wine Economics "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."-- Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."-- Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."-- John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."-- J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
" Creating Wine draws on richly diverse primary sources from the New and Old World to explain how modern wine came into being during the first period of globalization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deftly written and immensely entertaining, it is hard to put down and is a must-read for anyone interested in the history or economics of wine and food. Bravo!"--James T. Lapsley, author of Bottled Poetry: Napa Winemaking from Prohibition to the Modern Era "Conventional wine histories typically give us the ch'teau, the region, or the country. Simpson's ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."--Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "Simpson fills a void in wine economics. We learn about environmental issues, overproduction, export crises, institutional responses, the eternal competition with beer, and the rise of wine production in the New World. All of this happened two hundred years ago, but the issues have not changed. This book has a lot to say and one learns a lot. A must-read for economists, historians, politicians, and wine lovers alike."--Karl Storchmann, New York University and Journal of Wine Economics "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."--Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
" Creating Wine draws on richly diverse primary sources from the New and Old World to explain how modern wine came into being during the first period of globalization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deftly written and immensely entertaining, it is hard to put down and is a must-read for anyone interested in the history or economics of wine and food. Bravo!"--James T. Lapsley, author of Bottled Poetry: Napa Winemaking from Prohibition to the Modern Era "Conventional wine histories typically give us the chteau, the region, or the country. Simpson's ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."--Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "Simpson fills a void in wine economics. We learn about environmental issues, overproduction, export crises, institutional responses, the eternal competition with beer, and the rise of wine production in the New World. All of this happened two hundred years ago, but the issues have not changed. This book has a lot to say and one learns a lot. A must-read for economists, historians, politicians, and wine lovers alike."--Karl Storchmann, New York University and Journal of Wine Economics "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."--Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
" Creating Wine draws on richly diverse primary sources from the New and Old World to explain how modern wine came into being during the first period of globalization in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deftly written and immensely entertaining, it is hard to put down and is a must-read for anyone interested in the history or economics of wine and food. Bravo!"--James T. Lapsley, author of Bottled Poetry: Napa Winemaking from Prohibition to the Modern Era "Simpson fills a void in wine economics. We learn about environmental issues, overproduction, export crises, institutional responses, the eternal competition with beer, and the rise of wine production in the New World. All of this happened two hundred years ago, but the issues have not changed. This book has a lot to say and one learns a lot. A must-read for economists, historians, politicians, and wine lovers alike."--Karl Storchmann, New York University and Journal of Wine Economics "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."--Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Conventional wine histories typically give us the chteau, the region, or the country. Simpson's ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."--Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"Simpson fills a void in wine economics. We learn about environmental issues, overproduction, export crises, institutional responses, the eternal competition with beer, and the rise of wine production in the New World. All of this happened two hundred years ago, but the issues have not changed. This book has a lot to say and one learns a lot. A must-read for economists, historians, politicians, and wine lovers alike."--Karl Storchmann, New York University and Journal of Wine Economics "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."--Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Conventional wine histories typically give us the chteau, the region, or the country. Simpson's ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."--Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author ofWar, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 "Creating Wineis a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This book tells the fascinating story of the transformation of wine from a cheap table drink for Europeans into a highly diversified, quasi-luxury good for consumers all over the world. Simpson maps the worldwide expansion of wine production and describes in lively but rigorous style the challenges that producers and merchants faced and the different solutions they adopted in Europe and the New World."--Giovanni Federico, author of Feeding the World "Conventional wine histories typically give us the chteau, the region, or the country. Simpson's ambitious work instead puts at the center and in global perspective the wine sector as a whole. This viewpoint provides valuable insight into struggles over the commoditization of wine, tensions within commodity chains, the challenge to the Old World of the New, and battles between brand, terroir , and varietal. The result is a refreshingly new and engrossing modern history of a global trade."--Paul Duguid, University of California, Berkeley "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"Why is it that the wine industry in the New World is dominated by a small number of wineries whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Flap Copy
"Why is it that the wine industry is dominated by a small number of wineries in the New World whereas in Europe there is no such concentration? This fascinating book not only reveals that this difference was evident more than a century ago, it also explains why, and the reasons are just as relevant today as they were then."--Kym Anderson, Wine Economics Research Centre and University of Adelaide "This is an impressive work of scholarship that brings together a wide range of material about the transformation and globalization of the wine industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Wine historians, economic historians, and significant segments of the general public will find much of interest."--John V. C. Nye, author of War, Wine, and Taxes: The Political Economy of Anglo-French Trade, 1689-1900 " Creating Wine is a boldly pioneering analysis of the complex process by which such forces as increased trade, rising consumer demand, and frequent economic crisis and disease ruptured the older wine economy and opened the way to a global wine industry in the twentieth century. However excellent, earlier studies in this area do not approach the level of concrete synthesis or analytic coherence this book provides. An impressive achievement."--J. Harvey Smith, Northern Illinois University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
A quote in this book's preface summarizes the different philosophies of the wine industry: "In the Old World, wine-making is an art; in America, it is an industry." "America" could be extended to include not only the Americas but also Australia. South Africa would be included today, but it was not a big player in the time period examined in the book. Since Simpson (economic history, Carlos III Univ. of Madrid) is interested in the industry, consumers and importers of wine also receive their due in this book. England's list of entries in the index is twice as long as Italy's. The separate paths of the two worlds are described in light of the substantial changes experienced in the eight decades considered. Transportation evolved to make wine accessible to large numbers of people in far-off places. Disease threatened the great vineyards of the Old World, and genetic manipulations produced disease-resistant grapes with other attractive qualities. Human nature was less malleable: traditional Old World vineyards remained small and fixated on terroir, while the New World experimented with technologies and concentrated industrial structures. Given Simpson's excellent job in describing the evolution of the industry, this book should find a large audience. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. J. M. Nowakowski Muskingum University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Anyone interested in the economic history of wine and drink should read this book.
"Anyone interested in the economic history of wine and drink should read this book."-- Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution
Anyone interested in the economic history of wine and drink should read this book. -- Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution
Given Simpson's excellent job in describing the evolution of the industry, this book should find a large audience.
"Given Simpson's excellent job in describing the evolution of the industry, this book should find a large audience."-- Choice
Given Simpson's excellent job in describing the evolution of the industry, this book should find a large audience. -- "Choice
In writing Creating Wine , James Simpson has done a great service to those who are interested in how a traditional industry inherited the modern, highly regulated, market structure we observe in places like France today. The book is important and carefully written. Anyone interested in wine or the interaction between markets and modern democratic states should buy it.
"In writing Creating Wine , James Simpson has done a great service to those who are interested in how a traditional industry inherited the modern, highly regulated, market structure we observe in places like France today. The book is important and carefully written. Anyone interested in wine or the interaction between markets and modern democratic states should buy it."-- EH.Net Reviews
In writing Creating Wine , James Simpson has done a great service to those who are interested in how a traditional industry inherited the modern, highly regulated, market structure we observe in places like France today. The book is important and carefully written. Anyone interested in wine or the interaction between markets and modern democratic states should buy it. -- "EH.Net Reviews
[T]here can be no doubt that wine buffs whose interest in what they drink stretches rather further than the supermarket price and the colour of the stuff in the bottle (why read the label?) will find this book fascinating.
"[T]here can be no doubt that wine buffs whose interest in what they drink stretches rather further than the supermarket price and the colour of the stuff in the bottle (why read the label?) will find this book fascinating."-- Books4Spain.com
[T]here can be no doubt that wine buffs whose interest in what they drink stretches rather further than the supermarket price and the colour of the stuff in the bottle (why read the label?) will find this book fascinating. -- Books4Spain.com
[T]his book . . . has a decidedly, and fittingly, scholarly tone. . . . There are some fascinating historical facts, including the widespread nature of fraud in the wine business.
"[T]his book . . . has a decidedly, and fittingly, scholarly tone. . . . There are some fascinating historical facts, including the widespread nature of fraud in the wine business."-- Lettie Teague, Wall Street Journal
[T]his book . . . has a decidedly, and fittingly, scholarly tone. . . . There are some fascinating historical facts, including the widespread nature of fraud in the wine business. -- Lettie Teague, Wall Street Journal
Winner of the 2012 OIV Award in History, International Organisation of Vine and Wine
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Shows how the wine industry was transformed in the decades leading up to the First World War, as the market expanded & modern logistics allowed producers to meet the increasing demand in wealthy, industrialised countries.
Main Description
Today's wine industry is characterized by regional differences not only in the wines themselves but also in the business models by which these wines are produced, marketed, and distributed. In Old World countries such as France, Italy, and Spain, small family vineyards and cooperative wineries abound. In New World regions like the United States and Australia, the industry is dominated by a handful of very large producers. This is the first book to trace the economic and historical forces that gave rise to very distinctive regional approaches to creating wine. James Simpson shows how the wine industry was transformed in the decades leading up to the First World War. Population growth, rising wages, and the railways all contributed to soaring European consumption even as many vineyards were decimated by the vine disease phylloxera. At the same time, new technologies led to a major shift in production away from Europe's traditional winemaking regions. Small family producers in Europe developed institutions such as regional appellations and cooperatives to protect their commercial interests as large integrated companies built new markets in America and elsewhere. Simpson examines how Old and New World producers employed diverging strategies to adapt to the changing global wine industry. Creating Wine includes chapters on Europe's cheap commodity wine industry; the markets for sherry, port, claret, and champagne; and the new wine industries in California, Australia, and Argentina.
Main Description
Today's wine industry is characterized by regional differences not only in the wines themselves but also in the business models by which these wines are produced, marketed, and distributed. In Old World countries such as France, Italy, and Spain, small family vineyards and cooperative wineries abound. In New World regions like the United States and Australia, the industry is dominated by a handful of very large producers. This is the first book to trace the economic and historical forces that gave rise to very distinctive regional approaches to creating wine. James Simpson shows how the wine industry was transformed in the decades leading up to the First World War. Population growth, rising wages, and the railways all contributed to soaring European consumption even as many vineyards were decimated by the vine disease phylloxera. At the same time, new technologies led to a major shift in production away from Europe's traditional winemaking regions. Small family producers in Europe developed institutions such as regional appellations and cooperatives to protect their commercial interests as large integrated companies built new markets in America and elsewhere. Simpson examines how Old and New World producers employed diverging strategies to adapt to the changing global wine industry. Creating Wineincludes chapters on Europe's cheap commodity wine industry; the markets for sherry, port, claret, and champagne; and the new wine industries in California, Australia, and Argentina.
Main Description
Today's wine industry is characterized by regional differences not only in the wines themselves but also in the business models by which these wines are produced, marketed, and distributed. In Old World countries such as France, Spain, and Italy, small family vineyards and cooperative wineries abound. In New World regions like the United States and Australia, the industry is dominated by a handful of very large producers. This is the first book to trace the economic and historical forces that gave rise to very distinctive regional approaches to creating wine. James Simpson shows how the wine industry was transformed in the decades leading up to the First World War. Population growth, rising wages, and the railways all contributed to soaring European consumption even as many vineyards were decimated by the vine disease phylloxera. At the same time, new technologies led to a major shift in production away from Europe's traditional winemaking regions. Small family producers in Europe developed institutions such as regional appellations and cooperatives to protect their commercial interests as large integrated companies built new markets in America and elsewhere. Simpson examines how Old and New World producers employed diverging strategies to adapt to the changing global wine industry. Creating Wine includes chapters on Europe's cheap commodity wine industry; the markets for sherry, port, claret, and champagne; and the new wine industries in California, Australia, and Argentina.

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