Catalogue

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Corruption by design [electronic resource] : building clean government in mainland China and Hong Kong /
Melanie Manion.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2004.
description
x, 283 p. : ill.
ISBN
0674014863
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2004.
isbn
0674014863
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8839140
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
Meticulously researched and magnificently structured, this volume by Manion (University of Wisconsin, Madison) offers a most thoughtful and thorough analysis of corruption in China. The book probes the differences in institutional design choices about anticorruption agencies, incentive structures, and constitutional designs between Hong Kong and mainland China. Chapter 1 sketches the problem of anticorruption reform, and chapter 2 examines the experience of corruption and anticorruption reform in Hong Kong under the British rule. Chapter 3 reviews the explosion of corruption in mainland China and its continued growth thereafter. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with routine anticorruption enforcement in China. The concluding chapter reflects on the choices that explain much of Hong Kong's success. The author cogently argues that the Chinese leadership has not signaled commitment to clean government with agency design or the role assigned to laws and legal institutions, and that the continued growth of corruption surely poses a greater challenge to the stability of political rule than the extension of small-scale institutional design to grand constitutional design. The book includes notes and an author and subject index; works in English and Chinese are cited. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Faculty, graduate students and undergraduates. S. K. Ma California State University, Los Angeles
Reviews
Review Quotes
Corruption by Design provides an excellent analysis of how officials in Hong Kong and mainland China have reacted to widespread corruption. Manion argues persuasively that strategies of reform must include enforcement, education, and institutional design. Her work brings together a huge amount of original material on mainland China and it is the most thorough examination of corruption in that country to date. This is significant given the secretive nature of corruption itself and the relative lack of transparency on the mainland.
It is conventional wisdom that there has been an explosion of corruption in mainland China in the reform era, with adverse consequences for the legitimacy of the regime. Yet there have been few book-length studies of the topic in the last five years. With its lucid argument and dual focus on Hong Kong and mainland China, Corruption by Design promises to be an important contribution.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Melanie Manion contrasts experiences of mainland China and Hong Kong to explore the pressing question of how governments can transform a culture of wide-spread corruption to clean government.
Main Description
the disparate outcomes in Hong Kong and mainland China.
Main Description
This book contrasts experiences of mainland China and Hong Kong to explore the pressing question of how governments can transform a culture of widespread corruption to one of clean government. Melanie Manion examines Hong Kong as the best example of the possibility of reform. Within a few years it achieved a spectacularly successful conversion to clean government. Mainland China illustrates the difficulty of reform. Despite more than two decades of anticorruption reform, corruption in China continues to spread essentially unabated. The book argues that where corruption is already commonplace, the context in which officials and ordinary citizens make choices to transact corruptly (or not) is crucially different from that in which corrupt practices are uncommon. A central feature of this difference is the role of beliefs about the prevalence of corruption and the reliability of government as an enforcer of rules ostensibly constraining official venality. Anticorruption reform in a setting of widespread corruption is a problem not only of reducing corrupt payoffs, but also of changing broadly shared expectations of venality. The book explores differences in institutional design choices about anticorruption agencies, appropriate incentive structures, and underlying constitutional designs that contribute to the disparate outcomes in Hong Kong and mainland China.
Main Description
This book contrasts experiences of mainland China and Hong Kong to explore the pressing question of how governments can transform a culture of widespread corruption to one of clean government. Melanie Manion examines Hong Kong as the best example of the possibility of reform. Within a few years it achieved a spectacularly successful conversion to clean government. Mainland China illustrates the difficulty of reform. Despite more than two decades of anticorruption reform, corruption in China continues to spread essentially unabated.The book argues that where corruption is already commonplace, the context in which officials and ordinary citizens make choices to transact corruptly (or not) is crucially different from that in which corrupt practices are uncommon. A central feature of this difference is the role of beliefs about the prevalence of corruption and the reliability of government as an enforcer of rules ostensibly constraining official venality. Anticorruption reform in a setting of widespread corruption is a problem not only of reducing corrupt payoffs, but also of changing broadly shared expectations of venality. The book explores differences in institutional design choices about anticorruption agencies, appropriate incentive structures, and underlying constitutional designs that contribute to the disparate outcomes in Hong Kong and mainland China.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Anticorruption Reform in a Setting of Widespread Corruption
Corruption and Anticorruption Reform in Hong Kong
An Explosion of Corruption in Mainland China
Problems of Routine Anticorruption Enforcement
Anticorruption Campaigns as Enforcement Mechanisms
Institutional Designs for Clean Government
Notes
Works Cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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