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Business of the heart [electronic resource] : religion and emotion in the nineteenth century /
John Corrigan.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
description
xii, 389 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520221966 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520221966 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8838263
 
Includes bibliographical references (p/99-369) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John Corrigan is the Edwin Scott Gaustad Professor of Religion and Professor of History, and Director of the Institute for the Study of Emotion, at Florida State University. He has served as regular or visiting faculty at the University of Virginia, Harvard, Oxford, Arizona State University, University of London, University of Wittenberg-Halle, and University College (Dublin), and as a visiting scholar at the American Academy in Rome.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Corrigan does much more than research and describe the religious revival of 1857-58. He gives us an imaginative and wide-ranging interpretative study of the revival's significance. He addresses an extraordinary range of phenomena-the turns of the business cycle in the 1850s, the social and ecclesiastical history of Boston, immigration and ethnic history, sex role differentiation, and the vexing problem of why males find it difficult to express their emotions. Altogether, I find this a fascinating, rewarding, and highly original new book."--Daniel Walker Howe, Rhodes Professor of History, Oxford University "This is an important contribution to American religious and cultural history. Corrigan draws together interpretive angles from social, intellectual, and religious history, as well as from the emergent field of the history of the emotions, in which he is doing path-breaking work."--Peter W. Williams, Distinguished Professor of American Studies and Comparative Religion, Miami University "John Corrigan's book is a terrific study of religion, emotion and society in the nineteenth century."--Joyce Appleby, Professor of History, University of California at Los Angeles "What Kuhn did for the history of science, or Geertz for cultural anthropology, Corrigan does for American religious history. He has written a breakthrough book that defines a fresh approach and merits the widest possible audience. His adroit and artful book shows us how to think anew about things prosaic and matters divine by revealing their complex entanglements and mutual transformations. Modernity gains here a compelling and engaging interpreter."--Joel Martin, Rupert Costo Professor of History, University of California, Riverside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Corrigan (Florida State Univ.) analyzes the 1857-58 "Businessmen's Revival" in Boston. Although he outlines the event itself, he devotes most of the study to examining the larger cultural features that help explain the revival. He identifies widespread anxiety created by rapid social change as the cause. Immigration (the Irish were already 28 percent of the population), the economic collapse of 1857, the development of conflicting gender roles, and leadership crises in the churches were all indirect but contributing factors to the revival. Corrigan illuminates the character of the revival by explaining the importance of "boyculture" (the prominent role of young men), spectacle (forms of mass entertainment, such as parades), performances (as witnessed regularly in the theaters), and assertive prayer (which was not passive but boldly demanded response from God). Corrigan finds emotion to be the heart of the personal experience of revival. Emotion linked the soul and God. In a businesslike contract, the believer gave his heart to God during the prayer meeting and received God's favor in return. Thus emotion became commodity. Corrigan's approach to the revival offers an important new interpretation of the religious and cultural experience of American society in the 1850s. All academic levels; general readers. W. L. Pitts Jr. Baylor University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
The "Businessmen's Revival" was a religious revival that unfolded in the wake of the 1857 market crash among white, middle-class Protestants. Delving into the religious history of Boston in the 1850s, John Corrigan gives an imaginative and wide-ranging interpretive study of the revival's significance. He uses it as a focal point for addressing a spectacular range of phenomena in American culture: the ecclesiastical and business history of Boston; gender roles and family life; the history of the theater and public spectacle; education; boyculture; and, especially, ideas about emotion during this period. This vividly written narrative recovers the emotional experiences of individuals from a wide array of little-used sources including diaries, correspondence, public records, and other materials. From these sources, Corrigan discovers that for these Protestants, the expression of emotion was a matter of transactions. They saw emotion as a commodity, and conceptualized relations between people, and between individuals and God, as transactions of emotion governed by contract. Religion became a business relation with God, with prayer as its legal tender. Entering this relationship, they were conducting the "business of the heart." This innovative study shows that the revival--with its commodification of emotional experience--became an occasion for white Protestants to underscore differences between themselves and others. The display of emotion was a primary indicator of membership in the Protestant majority, as much as language, skin color, or dress style. As Corrigan unravels the significance of these culturally constructed standards for emotional life, his book makes an important contribution to recent efforts to explore the links between religion and emotion, and is an important new chapter in the history of religion.
Main Description
A study of Boston's "Businessman's Revival" of 1958. The phenomenon coincided with the public's emerging attitude that emotion, like money, was a commodity to be strictly regulated in order to avoid personal and communal disaster. Religion soon became viewed as a business relation with God, prayer its legal tender.
Main Description
The "Businessmens Revival" was a religious revival that unfolded in the wake of the 1857 market crash among white, middle-class Protestants. Delving into the religious history of Boston in the 1850s, John Corrigan gives an imaginative and wide-ranging interpretive study of the revivals significance. He uses it as a focal point for addressing a spectacular range of phenomena in American culture: the ecclesiastical and business history of Boston; gender roles and family life; the history of the theater and public spectacle; education; boyculture; and, especially, ideas about emotion during this period. This vividly written narrative recovers the emotional experiences of individuals from a wide array of little-used sources including diaries, correspondence, public records, and other materials. From these sources, Corrigan discovers that for these Protestants, the expression of emotion was a matter of transactions. They saw emotion as a commodity, and conceptualized relations between people, and between individuals and God, as transactions of emotion governed by contract. Religion became a business relation with God, with prayer as its legal tender. Entering this relationship, they were conducting the "business of the heart." This innovative study shows that the revival--with its commodification of emotional experience--became an occasion for white Protestants to underscore differences between themselves and others. The display of emotion was a primary indicator of membership in the Protestant majority, as much as language, skin color, or dress style. As Corrigan unravels the significance of these culturally constructed standards for emotional life, his book makes an important contribution to recent efforts to explore the links between religion and emotion, and is an important new chapter in the history of religion.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Religion, Emotion, and the Double Selfp. 1
The Businessmen's Revivalp. 12
The Anxiety of Boston at Mid-Centuryp. 41
Overexcitement, Economic Collapse, and the Regulation of Businessp. 61
Emotion, Collective Performance, and Valuep. 82
Emotional Religion and the Ministerial "Balance-Wheel"p. 104
Men, Women, and Emotionp. 128
Domestic Contractsp. 163
Clerks, Apprentices, and Boyculturep. 186
Prayerful Transactionsp. 207
Emotion, Character, and Ethnicityp. 231
Epilogue: The Meaning of the Revival and Its Legacyp. 251
History, Religion, and Emotion: A Historiographical Surveyp. 269
Emotion as Heart, Blood, and Bodyp. 281
Emotion and the Common Sense Philosophyp. 294
Notesp. 299
Selected Manuscript Diaries, Journals, Correspondences, and Papersp. 367
Indexp. 371
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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