Catalogue


Bringing the gods to mind [electronic resource] : mantra and ritual in early Indian sacrifice /
Laurie L. Patton.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
description
xv, 289 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520240871 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
title subject
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005.
isbn
0520240871 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8838190
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-274) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Laurie L. Patton is Winship Distinguished Research Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Early Indian Religion at Emory University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"In her Bringing "The Gods to Mind "Laurie Patton employs a rich mixture of theoretical insights to tease out the functions and meanings of the Vedic mantras within their ritual settings. With a deep understanding of not only the Vedic texts but also the later Brahmanical ritual tradition, Patton throws new and fresh light on the socio-religious history of ancient India. This is a pathbreaking study that will interest not only specialists in Indian religions but also scholars exploring the intersection between word and ritual, between speech and performance. A truly masterly tour-de-force."--Patrick Olivelle, author of "The Asrama System" and translator of the "Upanisads," the "Dharmasutras," and the "Law Code of Manu" "We have long needed a poetic scholar to read Vedic mantra. Laurie Patton has given us a erudite yet highly accessible volume combining her impeccable scholarship with refined aesthetic sensibilities, recreating the meaning of Vedic hymns in the changing contexts of their actual use. Her sensitive readings of texts makes the social contexts of Vedic ritual come to life. "--V.Narayana Rao, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Flap Copy
"In her Bringing The Gods to Mind Laurie Patton employs a rich mixture of theoretical insights to tease out the functions and meanings of the Vedic mantras within their ritual settings. With a deep understanding of not only the Vedic texts but also the later Brahmanical ritual tradition, Patton throws new and fresh light on the socio-religious history of ancient India. This is a pathbreaking study that will interest not only specialists in Indian religions but also scholars exploring the intersection between word and ritual, between speech and performance. A truly masterly tour-de-force."--Patrick Olivelle, author of The Asrama System and translator of the Upanisads , the Dharmasutras, and the Law Code of Manu "We have long needed a poetic scholar to read Vedic mantra. Laurie Patton has given us a erudite yet highly accessible volume combining her impeccable scholarship with refined aesthetic sensibilities, recreating the meaning of Vedic hymns in the changing contexts of their actual use. Her sensitive readings of texts makes the social contexts of Vedic ritual come to life. "--V.Narayana Rao, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Flap Copy
"In her BringingThe Gods to MindLaurie Patton employs a rich mixture of theoretical insights to tease out the functions and meanings of the Vedic mantras within their ritual settings. With a deep understanding of not only the Vedic texts but also the later Brahmanical ritual tradition, Patton throws new and fresh light on the socio-religious history of ancient India. This is a pathbreaking study that will interest not only specialists in Indian religions but also scholars exploring the intersection between word and ritual, between speech and performance. A truly masterly tour-de-force."--Patrick Olivelle, author ofThe Asrama Systemand translator of theUpanisads, theDharmasutras,and theLaw Code of Manu "We have long needed a poetic scholar to read Vedic mantra. Laurie Patton has given us a erudite yet highly accessible volume combining her impeccable scholarship with refined aesthetic sensibilities, recreating the meaning of Vedic hymns in the changing contexts of their actual use. Her sensitive readings of texts makes the social contexts of Vedic ritual come to life. "--V.Narayana Rao, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-12-01:
In this important book, Patton (Emory) turns from her earlier work on mantra in Indian myth to its role in the ritual of the Vedas. Inspired by fieldwork conducted in Maharashtra, the author looks at the role of imagination in ritual and the role mantric verses play in provoking and manipulating mental constructions in order to make ritual events happen. The results of her study then help in the task of uncovering the shift from Vedic to classical Hindu religious forms: from the solemn public ritual to the less solemn private practice, and from the legitimate to the degenerate or "magical." Two things make this book stand out: first, its excellent discussion of the history and practice of viniyoga, a type of hermeneutical interpretation tying spoken work to ritual context; and, second, by way of case studies, its translation and annotation of some important Rigvedic hymns. Viniyoga is the application of metonymy or associational thought between text and ritual context made sensible by its being embedded within larger traditions of interpretation. The case examples are studies of hymns that deal with fire and light, the enemy, acquiring mental power, journeying, and heaven; they include clear, accessible translations accompanied by informed and informative readings of each hymn. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Undergraduates through faculty/researchers. E. Findly Trinity College (CT)
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2005
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Summaries
Long Description
This elegantly written book introduces a new perspective on Indic religious history by rethinking the role of mantra in Vedic ritual. In "Bringing the Gods to Mind, "Laurie Patton takes a new look at mantra as "performed poetry" and in five case studies draws a portrait of early Indian sacrifice that moves beyond the well-worn categories of "magic" and "magico-religious" thought in Vedic sacrifice. Treating Vedic mantra as a sophisticated form of artistic composition, she develops the idea of metonymy, or associational thought, as a major motivator for the use of mantra in sacrificial performance. Filling a long-standing gap in our understanding, her book provides a history of the Indian interpretive imagination and a study of the mental creativity and hermeneutic sophistication of Vedic religion.
Long Description
This elegantly written book introduces a new perspective on Indic religious history by rethinking the role of mantra in Vedic ritual. InBringing the Gods to Mind,Laurie Patton takes a new look at mantra as "performed poetry" and in five case studies draws a portrait of early Indian sacrifice that moves beyond the well-worn categories of "magic" and "magico-religious" thought in Vedic sacrifice. Treating Vedic mantra as a sophisticated form of artistic composition, she develops the idea of metonymy, or associational thought, as a major motivator for the use of mantra in sacrificial performance. Filling a long-standing gap in our understanding, her book provides a history of the Indian interpretive imagination and a study of the mental creativity and hermeneutic sophistication of Vedic religion.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Patton introduces a new perspective on Indic religious history by rethinking the role of mantra in Vedic ritual. Treating Vedic mantra as a form of artistic composition she develops the idea of metonymy, or associational thought, as a major motivator for the use of mantra in sacrificial performance.
Back Cover Copy
"In her Bringing "The Gods to Mind Laurie Patton employs a rich mixture of theoretical insights to tease out the functions and meanings of the Vedic mantras within their ritual settings. With a deep understanding of not only the Vedic texts but also the later Brahmanical ritual tradition, Patton throws new and fresh light on the socio-religious history of ancient India. This is a pathbreaking study that will interest not only specialists in Indian religions but also scholars exploring the intersection between word and ritual, between speech and performance. A truly masterly tour-de-force."--Patrick Olivelle, author of "The Asrama System and translator of the "Upanisads, the "Dharmasutras, and the "Law Code of Manu
Short Annotation
This book is a study of mantra in ancient Indian ritual that brings forward important and overlooked sanskrit texts.
Main Description
This elegantly written book introduces a new perspective on Indic religious history by rethinking the role of mantra in Vedic ritual. In Bringing the Gods to Mind, Laurie Patton takes a new look at mantra as "performed poetry" and in five case studies draws a portrait of early Indian sacrifice that moves beyond the well-worn categories of "magic" and "magico-religious" thought in Vedic sacrifice. Treating Vedic mantra as a sophisticated form of artistic composition, she develops the idea of metonymy, or associational thought, as a major motivator for the use of mantra in sacrificial performance. Filling a long-standing gap in our understanding, her book provides a history of the Indian interpretive imagination and a study of the mental creativity and hermeneutic sophistication of Vedic religion.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The Theories
Poetry, Ritual, and Associational Thought in Early India: The Sourcesp. 15
Poetry, Ritual, and Associational Thought in Early India: The Theoriesp. 38
Viniyoga: The Recovery of a Hermeneutic Principlep. 59
The Case Studies
Fire, Light, and Ingesting over Timep. 91
The Vedic "Other": Spoilers of Successp. 117
A History of the Quest for Mental Powerp. 142
The Poetics of Paths: Mantras of Journeysp. 152
A Short History of Heaven: From Making to Gaining the Highest Abodep. 168
Conclusions: Laughter and the Creeper Mantrap. 182
Notesp. 197
Glossaryp. 237
Bibliographyp. 249
Index Locorump. 275
Index Nominump. 281
General Indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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