Catalogue


Beyond the conceivable [electronic resource] : studies on Germany, Nazism, and the Holocaust /
Dan Diner.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c2000.
description
286 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520213459 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c2000.
isbn
0520213459 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8837934
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The brilliance of Diner's essays stems in good part from the astonishingly wide perspectives in which he sets his inquiries and from the interdisciplinary synthesis he is able to master. Publication in English is of extreme importance in enriching the debates on Nazism and the Holocaust in this country."--Saul Friedlander, author ofNazi Germany and the Jews "One of the most probing and intellectually sophisticated historians of the German Jewish conundrum, Dan Diner has a quality of mind and an intellectual depth and precision that are altogether unique."--Anson Rabinbach, author ofIn the Shadow of Catastrophe
Flap Copy
"The brilliance of Diner's essays stems in good part from the astonishingly wide perspectives in which he sets his inquiries and from the interdisciplinary synthesis he is able to master. Publication in English is of extreme importance in enriching the debates on Nazism and the Holocaust in this country."--Saul Friedlander, author of Nazi Germany and the Jews "One of the most probing and intellectually sophisticated historians of the German Jewish conundrum, Dan Diner has a quality of mind and an intellectual depth and precision that are altogether unique."--Anson Rabinbach, author of In the Shadow of Catastrophe
Summaries
Long Description
The major essays of Dan Diner, who is widely read and quoted in Germany and Israel, are finally collected in an English edition. They reflect the author's belief that the Holocaust transcends traditional patterns of historical understanding and requires an epistemologically distinct approach. One can no longer assume that actors as well as historians are operating in the same conceptual universe, sharing the same criteria of rational discourse. This is particularly true of victims and perpetrators, whose memories shape the distortions of historical narrative in ways often diametrically opposed. The essays are divided into three groups. The first group talks about anti-Semitism in the context of the 1930s and the ideologies that drove the Nazi regime. The second group concentrates on the almost unbelievably different perceptions of the "Final Solution," with particularly illuminating discussions of the Judenrat, or Jewish council. The third group considers the Holocaust as the subject of narrative and historical memory. Diner focuses above all on perspectives: the very notions of rationality and irrationality are seen to be changeable, depending on who is applying them. And because neither rational nor irrational motives can be universally assigned to participants in the Holocaust, Diner proposes, from the perspective of the victims, the idea of the counterrational. His work is directed toward developing a theory of Holocaust historiography and offers, clearly and coherently, the highest level of reflection on these problems.
Main Description
A collection of essays on the Holocaust and historical memory by one of the most distinguished Jewish-German Holocaust historian of his generation.
Main Description
The major essays of Dan Diner, who is widely read and quoted in Germany and Israel, are finally collected in an English edition. They reflect the author s belief that the Holocaust transcends traditional patterns of historical understanding and requires an epistemologically distinct approach. One can no longer assume that actors as well as historians are operating in the same conceptual universe, sharing the same criteria of rational discourse. This is particularly true of victims and perpetrators, whose memories shape the distortions of historical narrative in ways often diametrically opposed. The essays are divided into three groups. The first group talks about anti-Semitism in the context of the 1930s and the ideologies that drove the Nazi regime. The second group concentrates on the almost unbelievably different perceptions of the "Final Solution," with particularly illuminating discussions of the Judenrat, or Jewish council. The third group considers the Holocaust as the subject of narrative and historical memory. Diner focuses above all on perspectives: the very notions of rationality and irrationality are seen to be changeable, depending on who is applying them. And because neither rational nor irrational motives can be universally assigned to participants in the Holocaust, Diner proposes, from the perspective of the victims, the idea of the counterrational. His work is directed toward developing a theory of Holocaust historiography and offers, clearly and coherently, the highest level of reflection on these problems.
Unpaid Annotation
"The brilliance of Diner's essays stems in good part from the astonishingly wide perspectives in which he sets his inquiries and from the interdisciplinary synthesis he is able to master. Publication in English is of extreme importance in enriching the debates on Nazism and the Holocaust in this country."--Saul Friedlander, author of "Nazi Germany and the Jews""One of the most probing and intellectually sophisticated historians of the German Jewish conundrum, Dan Diner has a quality of mind and an intellectual depth and precision that are altogether unique."--Anson Rabinbach, author of "In the Shadow of Catastrophe
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Political Ideology and Historical Context
On the Brink of Dictatorships: Carl Schmitt and the Weimar Constitutionp. 11
Knowledge of Expansion: On the Geopolitics of Karl Haushoferp. 26
Norms for Domination: Nazi Legal Concepts of World Orderp. 49
The Catastrophe before the Catastrophe: 1938 in Historical Contextp. 78
Perceptions of the Holocaust
The Limits of Reason: Max Horkheimer on Anti-Semitism and Exterminationp. 97
Beyond the Conceivable: The Judenrat as Borderline Experiencep. 117
Historical Understanding and Counterrationality: The Judenrat as Epistemological Vantagep. 130
On Rationality and Rationalization: An Economistic Explanation of the Final Solutionp. 138
Historical Experience and Cognition: Juxtaposing Perspectives on National Socialismp. 160
Holocaust Narratives
Varieties of Narration: The Holocaust in Historical Memoryp. 173
Nazism and Stalinism: On Memory, Arbitrariness, Labor and Deathp. 187
Cumulative Contingency: Historicizing Legitimacy in Israeli Discoursep. 201
On Guilt Discourse and Other Narrations: German Questions and Universal Answersp. 218
Notesp. 231
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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