Catalogue


Ancient perspectives on Egypt [electronic resource] /
edited by Roger Matthews and Cornelia Roemer.
imprint
London : UCL Press, Institute of Archaeology ; Portland, Or. : Cavendish Pub., 2003.
description
xiii, 253 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1844720020 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
London : UCL Press, Institute of Archaeology ; Portland, Or. : Cavendish Pub., 2003.
isbn
1844720020 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes extensively revised and updated papers originally presented at a conference held at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London in December 2000.
catalogue key
8837472
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-242) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-06-01:
Conferences are the primary venues where scholarly discourse takes place. Conference proceedings, however, have an established and deservedly bad reputation. Like all too many of the conferences in which they originate, proceedings often consist of a mass of disparate papers only loosely connected to each other by disciplinary ties. Encounters with Ancient Egypt is that rare thing, an innovative and extraordinarily interesting set of conference proceedings. The 96 papers and almost 1800 pages in the eight volumes of this set are the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute of Archaeology of University College, London, in December 2000.The conference organizers had three goals: (1) to help end the isolation of Egyptian archaeology from contemporary developments in other areas of archaeology; (2) to firmly situate Egypt in its African context; and (3) to analyze responses to Egypt by other cultures from antiquity to the present. The resulting conference and proceedings were thematically remarkably tightly organized. Each title contains an extensive introduction outlining the theme of that volume, followed by a series of essays exploring the theme from different perspectives; each concludes with references and an index. Three volumes focus on ancient Egypt, exploring its place in Africa, its view of its own past, and how Egyptians conceptualized their encounters with other cultures and peoples, both real and imaginary. A fourth volume reverses the perspective and examines how Egypt was viewed by neighboring cultures. The remaining four volumes examine various aspects of the afterlife of ancient Egypt. Two of these four trace the discourse on Egypt from antiquity to the 19th century and from Napoleon's invasion of Egypt to the present; the other two analyze the significance of Egypt in modern Western culture, specifically in architecture and popular culture.Encounters with Ancient Egypt is a significant contribution to both Egyptology and cultural studies. The articles are of uniformly high quality and some are revelations, such as Okasha El Daly's and Charles Burnett's studies of the views of Egypt in medieval Arabic literature and the Latin Middle Ages. Of course, not all volumes are equally successful. Ancient Egypt in Africa, for example, cannot escape the lack of evidence for Egyptian influence south and west of Nubia. Likewise, concepts such as "Orientalism" and "Eurocentrism" occur too often as explanations instead of contextualizations. This excellent set belongs in all university libraries. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Undergraduate collections and up. S. M. Burstein California State University, Los Angeles
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Ancient Perspectives on Egypt contains 12 papers that try to reflect how Egypt might have been perceived by those who came into contact with it. This is arguable the most disparate of the volumes, covering a wide area (outside Africa) over a long chronicological span, and the editors have done well to marshal the papers into a useful order.'Times Higher Educational Supplement, December 2004'the series is well organized,informative and comprehensive. Through careful analysis of a multiplicity of sources at hand, the authors, who come from a great variety of disciplines, have presented us with a series that is at once substantial as well as engaging and innovative. An extraordinary work of synthesis, the series promises to endure as an important contribution to the study of Ancient Egypt.' Professor Ronald J Leprohon, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilisation, University of Toronto.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2004
Choice, June 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The discipline of Egyptology has been criticised for being too insular,with little awareness of the development of archaeologies elsewhere. It has remained theoretically underdeveloped. For example the role of Ancient Egypt within Africa has rarely been considered jointly by Egyptologists and Africanists. Egypt's own view of itself has been neglected; views of it in the ancient past, in more recent times and today have remained underexposed. Encounters with Ancient Egypt is a series of eight books which addresses these issues. The books interrelate, inform and illuminate one another and will appeal to a wide market including academics, students and the general public interested in Archaeology, Egyptology, Anthropology, Architecture, Design and History. The allure of Egypt is not exclusive to the modern world. Egypt also held a fascination and attraction for people of the past. In this book, academics from a wide range of disciplines assess the significance of Egypt within the settings of its past. The chronological span is from later prehistory, through to the earliest literate eras of interaction with Mesopotamia and the Levant, the Aegean, Greece and Rome. Ancient Perspectives on Egypt includes both archaeological and documented evidence, which ranges from the earliest writing attested in Egypt and Mesopotamia in the late fourth millennium BC, to graffiti from Abydos that demonstrate pilgrimages from all over the Mediterranean world, to the views of Roman poets on the nature of Egypt. This book presents, for the first time in a single volume, a multi-faceted but coherent collection of images of Egypt from, and of, the past.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The chronology of Egypt ranges from the pre-dynastic to the dynastic, Hellenistic, Roman, late-antique, Islamic, colonial and modern. The books in this series examine how these influences have been constantly reconfigured in response to changing ideologies and strategies for appropriating the past.
Main Description
The discipline of Egyptology has been criticised for being too insular,with little awareness of the development of archaeologies elsewhere. It has remained theoretically underdeveloped. For example the role of Ancient Egypt within Africa has rarely been considered jointly by Egyptologists and Africanists. Egypt's own view of itself has been neglected; views of it in the ancient past, in more recent times and today have remained underexposed. Encounters with Ancient Egyptis a series of eight books which addresses these issues. The books interrelate, inform and illuminate one another and will appeal to a wide market including academics, students and the general public interested in Archaeology, Egyptology, Anthropology, Architecture, Design and History. Geographically, Egypt is clearly on the African continent, yet Ancient Egypt is routinely regarded as a non-African cultural form. The significance of Ancient Egypt for the rest of Africa is a hotly debated issue with complex ramifications. This book considers how Ancient Egypt was dislocated from Africa, drawing on a wide range of sources. It examines key issues such as the evidence for actual contacts between Egypt and other early African cultures, and how influential, or not, Egypt was on them. Some scholars argue that to its north Egypt's influence on Mediterranean civilization was downplayed by western scholarship. Further afield, on the African continent perceptions of Ancient Egypt were coloured by biblical sources, emphasizing the persecution of the Israelites. An extensive selection of fresh insights are provided, several focusing on cultural interactions between Egypt and Nubia from 1000 BCE to 500 CE, developing a nuanced picture of these interactions and describing the limitations of an 'Egyptological' approach to them.
Unpaid Annotation
Egypt was in contact with other regions and polities from an early period. But what did these foreigners make of the Egyptians? These twelve essays explore the complexities of answering this question at different points in Egypt's history.
Table of Contents
Series Editor's Forewordp. v
Contributorsp. ix
List of Figuresp. xi
A note on transliteration from ancient Egyptianp. xv
Introduction: the Worlds of Ancient Egypt--Aspects, Sources, Interactionsp. 1
South Levantine Encounters with Ancient Egypt at the Beginning of the Third Millenniump. 21
Egyptian Stone Vessels and the Politics of Exchange (2617-1070 BC)p. 39
Reconstructing the Role of Egyptian Culture in the Value Regimes of the Bronze Age Aegean: Stone Vessels and their Social Contextsp. 57
Love and War in the Late Bronze Age: Egypt and Hattip. 75
Egypt and Mesopotamia in the Late Bronze and Iron Agesp. 101
Finding the Egyptian in Early Greek Artp. 115
Upside Down and Back to Front: Herodotus and the Greek Encounter with Egyptp. 145
Encounters with Ancient Egypt: The Hellenistic Greek Experiencep. 157
Pilgrimage in Greco-Roman Egypt: New Perspectives on Graffiti from the Memnonion at Abydosp. 171
Carry-on at Canopus: the Nilotic mosaic from Palestrina and Roman Attitudes to Egyptp. 191
Roman Poets on Egyptp. 203
Referencesp. 217
Place namesp. 243
Names of people, peoples and deitiesp. 247
Topicsp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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