Catalogue


The 1970s [electronic resource] : a new global history from civil rights to economic inequality /
Thomas Borstelmann.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2012.
description
viii, 401 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691141568 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780691141565 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2012.
isbn
0691141568 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780691141565 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Crosscurrents of crisis in 1970s America : trouble abroad, corruption at home, conservatism and the distrust of government, economic insecurity, turning inward -- The rising tide of equality and democratic reform : women in the public sphere, women in the private sphere, the many frontiers of equality, political reform, resistance -- The spread of market values : a sea change of principles, the economy goes south, globalization's gathering speed, from citizenship to deregulation, market solutions for every problem, a freer market, a coarser culture -- The retreat of empires and the global advance of the market : the emergence of human rights, European empires and Southern Africa, the Soviet Empire, the American empire, the Israeli exception, the retreat of the state, China and the hollowing out of socialism -- Resistance to the new hyper-individualism : the environmentalist challenge, religious resurgence at home, religious resurgence in Israel, religious resurgence in the Muslim world, Jimmy Carter as a man of his times -- More and less equal since the 1970s : evidence to the contrary, inclusiveness ascending, markets persisting, unrestrained consumption, inequality rising.
catalogue key
8836961
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The United States and the world have become more integrated and diverse during the last several decades, and this book helps us understand how that transformation came about. Borstelmann locates the origins of the contemporary world in the 1970s and presents by far the most comprehensive and persuasive portrait of that decade. Ranging from politics and ideology to economic globalization and religious fundamentalism, this book makes compelling reading."--Akira Iriye, Harvard University "With brilliant insight and elegant, lively prose, Thomas Borstelmann makes sense of the seemingly incomprehensible contradictions and complexities of the 1970s. Demonstrating how the United States became both more and less equal, and linking this development to international trends, Borstelmann offers a magisterial global study of a decade that profoundly transformed America and the world. A must-read for anyone who wants to understand our past and present."--Elaine Tyler May, author of America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation "This fascinating and important book shows how the United States simultaneously embraced both egalitarian norms and market principles in the 1970s--resulting in the paradoxical emergence of greater diversity and inclusivity right in tandem with soaring economic inequality. Profoundly thoughtful and beautifully written, The 1970s makes the compelling case that this pivotal decade gave birth to our contemporary political and social life."--Suzanne Mettler, Cornell University "The importance of the 1970s in explaining contemporary America and large parts of the world cannot be overstated. Borstelmann makes a clear and compelling point about how the decade's developments shaped or played out over the remainder of the century and beyond. The breadth of the book's material is extremely impressive and utterly up-to-date."--Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations "Offering a wide-ranging, general history of the United States in the 1970s, this book brings together a wealth of information, a lively and accessible style, and a persuasive thematic frame. There is no better introduction to this crucial and turbulent decade."--Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"The United States and the world have become more integrated and diverse during the last several decades, and this book helps us understand how that transformation came about. Borstelmann locates the origins of the contemporary world in the 1970s and presents by far the most comprehensive and persuasive portrait of that decade. Ranging from politics and ideology to economic globalization and religious fundamentalism, this book makes compelling reading."--Akira Iriye, Harvard University "With brilliant insight and elegant, lively prose, Thomas Borstelmann makes sense of the seemingly incomprehensible contradictions and complexities of the 1970s. Demonstrating how the United States became both more and less equal, and linking this development to international trends, Borstelmann offers a magisterial global study of a decade that profoundly transformed America and the world. A must-read for anyone who wants to understand our past and present."--Elaine Tyler May, author of America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation "The importance of the 1970s in explaining contemporary America and large parts of the world cannot be overstated. Borstelmann makes a clear and compelling point about how the decade's developments shaped or played out over the remainder of the century and beyond. The breadth of the book's material is extremely impressive and utterly up-to-date."--Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations "Offering a wide-ranging, general history of the United States in the 1970s, this book brings together a wealth of information, a lively and accessible style, and a persuasive thematic frame. There is no better introduction to this crucial and turbulent decade."--Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"The importance of the 1970s in explaining contemporary America and large parts of the world cannot be overstated. Borstelmann makes a clear and compelling point about how the decade's developments shaped or played out over the remainder of the century and beyond. The breadth of the book's material is extremely impressive and utterly up-to-date."--Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations "Offering a wide-ranging, general history of the United States in the 1970s, this book brings together a wealth of information, a lively and accessible style, and a persuasive thematic frame. There is no better introduction to this crucial and turbulent decade."--Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University
Flap Copy
"The United States and the world have become more integrated and diverse during the last several decades, and this book helps us understand how that transformation came about. Borstelmann locates the origins of the contemporary world in the 1970s and presents by far the most comprehensive and persuasive portrait of that decade. Ranging from politics and ideology to economic globalization and religious fundamentalism, this book makes compelling reading."--Akira Iriye, Harvard University "The importance of the 1970s in explaining contemporary America and large parts of the world cannot be overstated. Borstelmann makes a clear and compelling point about how the decade's developments shaped or played out over the remainder of the century and beyond. The breadth of the book's material is extremely impressive and utterly up-to-date."--Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations "Offering a wide-ranging, general history of the United States in the 1970s, this book brings together a wealth of information, a lively and accessible style, and a persuasive thematic frame. There is no better introduction to this crucial and turbulent decade."--Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
Borstelmann (Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln) adds yet one more title to the growing list of historical examinations of the 1970s. Like many of the recently published histories of the seventies, Borstelmann's argues it is in that decade of disco and discontent, punk music and platform shoes, Vietnam and the Iranian hostage crisis that one can now see the fruition of the 1960s' great movements for social change in both personal and political spheres. What sets this book apart, though, is the author's global approach, making clear that by the 1970s, while other countries may not have seen the US as the preeminent world leader it had been, it was very much a part of a world in which, thanks largely to technological advantages, boundaries of time and space and even culture were collapsing. Borstelmann also concisely brings readers to the present, concluding that while Americans have become less racist and sexist and more tolerant of diversity and difference, they have as a nation allowed economic inequality to reach near-epic proportions--in other words, the 1 percent versus the 99 percent. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. K. B. Nutter Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2011-08-22:
Keeping contemporary history timely and accessible, Borstelmann (The Cold War and the Color Line) shows the significance of 1970s American politics, culture, and religion on the following decades. As a world-renowned historian at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, he accurately explores political and social crises, gender and racial equality protests, alterations in global market trends, and regional turbulence throughout the Soviet Union, Africa, and the Far East. The flower children, Borstelmann notes, were disillusioned by the endless Vietnam War, Nixon's arrogant Republican Party firmly in command in Washington. The author's sterling commentary on the rise of the feminist movement, the decline of the Soviet empire, and the new Christian right's courtship of Capitol Hill sets this book apart from other surveys of the "Me Decade." Nuggets of genuine insight without any social agenda are found frequently within these pages. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-11-15:
Borstelmann (history, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln; The Cold War and the Color Line) came of age in the 1970s. In this sweeping survey, he offers a fresh assessment of the ideas and events of that much maligned decade, moving beyond the easy retelling of the Watergate scandal and the failure of the Carter presidency. Borstelmann is more interested in tracing the emergence of political and social movements (feminism, environmentalism, evangelicalism) and the resurgence of free-market economics. There are two broad themes here: the shift from faith in the public sector to faith in the private sector, and the impact of this in the international arena. Borstelmann argues that the resurgence of religious fundamentalism in the United States, Israel, and the Muslim world was a reaction to the global drive toward more equality and to what Borstelmann calls "hyper-individualism." He concludes that today's polarized society (culturally liberal and economically conservative) is a result of seeds sown in the 1970s. VERDICT While this is a scholarly work, with heavy doses of economic and political theory, Borstelmann's style is accessible to a wide audience; college and university students will benefit from the historic perspective on contemporary issues.-Thomas A. Karel, Franklin & Marshall Coll. Lib., Lancaster, PA (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
What sets this book apart . . . is the author's global approach, making clear that by the 1970s, while other countries may not have seen the US as the preeminent world leader it had been, it was very much a part of a world in which, thanks largely to technological advantages, boundaries of time and space and even culture were collapsing. Borstelmann also concisely brings readers to the present, concluding that while Americans have become less racist and sexist and more tolerant of diversity and difference, they have as a nation allowed economic inequality to reach near-epic proportions--in other words, the 1 percent versus the 99 percent.
Used as a text to enter the field of 1970s U.S. history the book excels and should receive wide readership. The study is accessible, very well written and incorporates much recent 1970s literature. . . . The 1970s is an important addition to the growing body of literature focused on the decade.
"Used as a text to enter the field of 1970s U.S. history the book excels and should receive wide readership. The study is accessible, very well written and incorporates much recent 1970s literature. . . . The 1970s is an important addition to the growing body of literature focused on the decade."-- Nick Blackboum, 49th Parallel
[T]his is an ambitious and important work that skillfully analyzes all aspects of the seventies and defines its legacy for present times.
"[T]his is an ambitious and important work that skillfully analyzes all aspects of the seventies and defines its legacy for present times."-- Karl Helicher, ForeWord Reviews
[T]his is an ambitious and important work that skillfully analyzes all aspects of the seventies and defines its legacy for present times. -- Karl Helicher, ForeWord Reviews
Thomas Borstelmann provides us with a significant addition to a growing body of literature on the decade. More than an exhaustive survey of American politics, culture, and society in the seventies (a considerable achievement in itself), the study focuses on what Borstelmann brilliantly identifies as the central crux of the decade. . . . Borstelmann has written a thought-provoking, lucid, and at-times brilliant account of American culture, society, and politics in the seventies. . . . [I]f readers approach this book as the capacious and beautifully written history of the United States that it is, they will be richly rewarded.
Keeping contemporary history timely and accessible, Borstelmann shows the significance of 1970s politics, culture, and religion on the following decades. . . . The author's sterling commentary on the rise of the feminist movement, the decline of the Soviet empire, and the New Christian right's courtship of Capitol Hill sets this book apart from other surveys of the 'Me Decade.' Nuggets of genuine insight without any social agenda are found frequently within these pages. -- Publishers Weekly
[I]ntelligent and well crafted.
"[I]ntelligent and well crafted."-- William L. O'neill, Pacific Historical Review
Keeping contemporary history timely and accessible, Borstelmann shows the significance of 1970s politics, culture, and religion on the following decades. . . . The author's sterling commentary on the rise of the feminist movement, the decline of the Soviet empire, and the New Christian right's courtship of Capitol Hill sets this book apart from other surveys of the 'Me Decade.' Nuggets of genuine insight without any social agenda are found frequently within these pages.
"Keeping contemporary history timely and accessible, Borstelmann shows the significance of 1970s politics, culture, and religion on the following decades. . . . The author's sterling commentary on the rise of the feminist movement, the decline of the Soviet empire, and the New Christian right's courtship of Capitol Hill sets this book apart from other surveys of the 'Me Decade.' Nuggets of genuine insight without any social agenda are found frequently within these pages."-- Publishers Weekly
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, August 2011
Booklist, November 2011
ForeWord Magazine, November 2011
Library Journal, November 2011
Choice, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The 1970s looks at an iconic decade when the cultural left and economic right came to the fore in American society and the world at large. While many have seen the 1970s as simply a period of failures epitomized by Watergate, inflation, the oil crisis, global unrest, and disillusionment with military efforts in Vietnam, Thomas Borstelmann creates a new framework for understanding the period and its legacy. He demonstrates how the 1970s increased social inclusiveness and, at the same time, encouraged commitments to the free market and wariness of government. As a result, American culture and much of the rest of the world became more--and less--equal. Borstelmann explores how the 1970s forged the contours of contemporary America. Military, political, and economic crises undercut citizens' confidence in government. Free market enthusiasm led to lower taxes, a volunteer army, individual 401(k) retirement plans, free agency in sports, deregulated airlines, and expansions in gambling and pornography. At the same time, the movement for civil rights grew, promoting changes for women, gays, immigrants, and the disabled. And developments were not limited to the United States. Many countries gave up colonial and racial hierarchies to develop a new formal commitment to human rights, while economic deregulation spread to other parts of the world, from Chile and the United Kingdom to China. Placing a tempestuous political culture within a global perspective, The 1970s shows that the decade wrought irrevocable transformations upon American society and the broader world that continue to resonate today.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title looks at an iconic decade when the cultural left and economic right came to the fore in American society and the world at large. The author creates a framework for understanding the 1970s and its legacy.
Back Cover Copy
"The United States and the world have become more integrated and diverse during the last several decades, and this book helps us understand how that transformation came about. Borstelmann locates the origins of the contemporary world in the 1970s and presents by far the most comprehensive and persuasive portrait of that decade. Ranging from politics and ideology to economic globalization and religious fundamentalism, this book makes compelling reading."-- Akira Iriye, Harvard University "With brilliant insight and elegant, lively prose, Thomas Borstelmann makes sense of the seemingly incomprehensible contradictions and complexities of the 1970s. Demonstrating how the United States became both more and less equal, and linking this development to international trends, Borstelmann offers a magisterial global study of a decade that profoundly transformed America and the world. A must-read for anyone who wants to understand our past and present."-- Elaine Tyler May, author of America and the Pill: A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation "This fascinating and important book shows how the United States simultaneously embraced both egalitarian norms and market principles in the 1970s--resulting in the paradoxical emergence of greater diversity and inclusivity right in tandem with soaring economic inequality. Profoundly thoughtful and beautifully written, The 1970s makes the compelling case that this pivotal decade gave birth to our contemporary political and social life."-- Suzanne Mettler, Cornell University "The importance of the 1970s in explaining contemporary America and large parts of the world cannot be overstated. Borstelmann makes a clear and compelling point about how the decade's developments shaped or played out over the remainder of the century and beyond. The breadth of the book's material is extremely impressive and utterly up-to-date."-- Thomas Bender, author of A Nation Among Nations "Offering a wide-ranging, general history of the United States in the 1970s, this book brings together a wealth of information, a lively and accessible style, and a persuasive thematic frame. There is no better introduction to this crucial and turbulent decade."-- Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Crosscurrents of Crisis in 1970s Americap. 19
Trouble Abroadp. 22
Corruption at Homep. 36
Conservatism and the Distrust of Governmentp. 45
Economic Insecurityp. 53
Turning Inwardp. 63
The Rising Tide of Equality and Democratic Reformp. 73
Women in the Public Spherep. 76
Women in the Private Spherep. 88
The Many Frontiers of Equalityp. 96
Political Reformp. 108
Resistancep. 114
The Spread of Market Valuesp. 122
A Sea Change of Principlesp. 126
The Economy Goes Southp. 133
Globalization's Gathering Speedp. 137
From Citizenship to Deregulationp. 144
Market Solutions for Every Problemp. 153
A Freer Market, A Coarser Culturep. 162
The Retreat of Empires and the Global Advance of the Marketp. 175
The Emergence of Human Rightsp. 179
European Empires and Southern Africap. 186
The Soviet Empirep. 193
The American Empirep. 201
The Israeli Exceptionp. 208
The Retreat of the Statep. 214
China and the Hollowing Out of Socialismp. 220
Resistance to the New Hyper-Individualismp. 227
The Environmentalist Challengep. 231
Religious Resurgence at Homep. 247
Religious Resurgence in Israelp. 258
Religious Resurgence in the Muslim Worldp. 263
Jimmy Carter as a Man of His Timesp. 270
More and Less Equal since the 1970sp. 279
Evidence to the Contraryp. 280
Inclusiveness Ascendingp. 287
Markets Persistingp. 295
Unrestrained Consumptionp. 299
Inequality Risingp. 306
Conclusionp. 312
Notesp. 319
Indexp. 371
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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