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1688 [electronic resource] : the first modern revolution /
Steve Pincus.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
description
xiii, 647 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
9780300115475
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
9780300115475
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The unmaking of a modern revolution -- Rethinking revolutions -- Going Dutch: the transformation of English society -- English politics at the accession of James II -- The ideology of Catholic modernity -- The practice of Catholic modernity -- Resistance to Catholic modernity -- Popular revolution -- Violent revolution -- Divisive revolution -- Revolution in foreign policy -- Revolution in political economy -- Revolution in the church -- Conclusion -- Assassination, association, and the consolidation of revolution -- Conclusion: the first modern revolution.
catalogue key
8836955
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [489]-617) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-07-01:
This book departs from the traditional Whiggish interpretation of the Glorious Revolution (1688-96) as a bloodless, aristocratic, and fundamentally conservative event in which the Dutch hero-king, William III, preserved the political and religious liberties of Protestant Englishmen from the bigoted, reactionary Roman Catholicism of James II. Rather, Pincus (Yale) regards the Glorious Revolution as a contest between two modernizing ideals of civil society, both of which sought to transform England radically. The revolutionaries favored a polity based on the Dutch Republic (commercial, religiously pluralist, with broad participation in politics), while James and his supporters looked to Bourbon France (founded upon land, religious uniformity, and absolute monarchy). To make his case, Pincus spends much time discussing the booming long-distance trade and burgeoning culture of consumption of late Stuart England. He rightly emphasizes the strength and depth of James's commitment to reinstituting Catholicism, but also recognizes the king's reluctance to accept papal authority. In this, too, James followed the example of his cousin Louis XIV. Pincus concludes that far from being a peaceable, consensual affair, the years of the Glorious Revolution matched the violence of the French Revolution. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. R. Bisson Belmont University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-09-01:
The Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 has traditionally been viewed as a very "un-revolutionay" revolution in the sense that is was seen as bloodless, consensual, and conservative. Pincus (history, Yale Univ.; The Politics of the Public Sphere in Early Modern England) refutes this view and instead argues that it was a complex event that had its origins in the previous century, was deeply influenced by the broader situation in Europe, and, most important, was the first truly modern revolution in the sense that it was "popular, violent and divisive," radically transforming English society. Using brilliant historical narrative, Pincus draws on numerous archival sources to detail the causes and consequences of various components of the revolution, including foreign policy, political economy, the Church, the popular revolution, and the violent revolution, also discussing revolutions in general. Verdict This is a highly impressive work that will ultimately change our understanding of the Glorious Revolution. Essential reading for all students of British history or of historical revolutions generally.-Carrie Benbow, Toronto P.L., Ont. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A magnificent, fully documented, very well written study of how the first thorough-going modern revolution was achieved with effort and against substantial obstacles over several years. It was bloody and popular, not merely a palace coup achieved with little loss of life, as is commonly held. Taking a broader chronological view and considering more aspects of society than previous historians, Pincus convincingly shows how England had become a commercial society by the 1680s, and the race was on to harness new wealth-a race between the absolutist modernizing vision of James II and the more tolerant and liberty-minded vision of his opponents. What emerged was the first modern state, with independent financial institutions and a strong sense of national and civil, as opposed to confessional, interest. The triumph of William III and his supporters was a conscious re-ordering of the place of the three kingdoms on the European and world stage. Pincus''s commitment to vigorous argument (in which he overturns many received views; his definition of revolution itself is bracingly refreshing) makes this book exciting reading, and will raise fascinated interest in the late 17th-century for many years to come. For anyone interested in modern liberal society, its origins, and why it is worth defending, this book is indispensable."-Nigel Smith, Princeton University
"A magnificent, fully documented, very well written study of how the first thorough-going modern revolution was achieved with effort and against substantial obstacles over several years. It was bloody and popular, not merely a palace coup achieved with little loss of life, as is commonly held. Taking a broader chronological view and considering more aspects of society than previous historians, Pincus convincingly shows how England had become a commercial society by the 1680s, and the race was on to harness new wealtha race between the absolutist modernizing vision of James II and the more tolerant and liberty-minded vision of his opponents. What emerged was the first modern state, with independent financial institutions and a strong sense of national and civil, as opposed to confessional, interest. The triumph of William III and his supporters was a conscious re-ordering of the place of the three kingdoms on the European and world stage. Pincus''s commitment to vigorous argument (in which he overturns many received views; his definition of revolution itself is bracingly refreshing) makes this book exciting reading, and will raise fascinated interest in the late 17th-century for many years to come. For anyone interested in modern liberal society, its origins, and why it is worth defending, this book is indispensable."Nigel Smith, Princeton University
�A magnificent, fully documented, very well written study of how the first thorough-going modern revolution was achieved with effort and against substantial obstacles over several years. It was bloody and popular, not merely a palace coup achieved with little loss of life, as is commonly held. Taking a broader chronological view and considering more aspects of society than previous historians, Pincus convincingly shows how England had become a commercial society by the 1680s, and the race was on to harness new wealth�a race between the absolutist modernizing vision of James II and the more tolerant and liberty-minded vision of his opponents. What emerged was the first modern state, with independent financial institutions and a strong sense of national and civil, as opposed to confessional, interest. The triumph of William III and his supporters was a conscious re-ordering of the place of the three kingdoms on the European and world stage. Pincus''s commitment to vigorous argument (in which he overturns many received views; his definition of revolution itself is bracingly refreshing) makes this book exciting reading, and will raise fascinated interest in the late 17th-century for many years to come. For anyone interested in modern liberal society, its origins, and why it is worth defending, this book is indispensable.��Nigel Smith, Princeton University
"[A]n important, fresh, and imaginative work of scholarship.it will have recast the origins of modern England as well as the history of the revolution of 1688." - Bernard Bailyn, New York Review of Books
"[A]n important, fresh, and imaginative work of scholarship. . . . It will have recast the origins of modern England as well as the history of the revolution of 1688."Bernard Bailyn, New York Review of Books
"[A]n important, fresh, and imaginative work of scholarship.it will have recast the origins of modern England as well as the history of the revolution of 1688."--Bernard Bailyn, The New York Review of Books
"[A]n important, fresh, and imaginative work of scholarship�it will have recast the origins of modern England as well as the history of the revolution of 1688."--Bernard Bailyn, The New York Review of Books
"A radical interpretation of a radical revolution. Steve Pincus''s brilliantly researched account of the extraordinary events of the 1680s and 1690s mounts an insuperable challenge to the comfortable view that the Glorious Revolution was another instance of British consensus politics, pragmatism, and common sense. 1688 recaptures the revolutionary nature of the Glorious Revolution and its far-reaching and interconnected conflicts over foreign policy, political economy, religion, and the nature of the modern state."-John Brewer, California Institute of Technology
"A radical interpretation of a radical revolution. Steve Pincus''s brilliantly researched account of the extraordinary events of the 1680s and 1690s mounts an insuperable challenge to the comfortable view that the Glorious Revolution was another instance of British consensus politics, pragmatism, and common sense. 1688 recaptures the revolutionary nature of the Glorious Revolution and its far-reaching and interconnected conflicts over foreign policy, political economy, religion, and the nature of the modern state."�John Brewer, California Institute of Technology
"A radical interpretation of a radical revolution. Steve Pincus''s brilliantly researched account of the extraordinary events of the 1680s and 1690s mounts an insuperable challenge to the comfortable view that the Glorious Revolution was another instance of British consensus politics, pragmatism, and common sense. 1688recaptures the revolutionary nature of the Glorious Revolution and its far-reaching and interconnected conflicts over foreign policy, political economy, religion, and the nature of the modern state."John Brewer, California Institute of Technology
"A significant contribution to the scholarship of the period. . . . Pincus develops his analysis through lively writing informed by extensive primary-source research. . . . There is much to be said for Pincus''s approach, blending economic and political theory together with seemingly effortless ease in a well-written and highly readable account...In the end, there is every reason to think that his analysis of the events of late-seventeenth-century England will, for want of a better term, revolutionize our understanding of the period."Scott Hendrix, Canadian Journal of History
Bronze Medal winner for the 2010 Independent Publishers Book Awards in the History Category
Honorable Mention in the Non-Fiction category of the 2009 New England Book Festival sponsored by the Larimar St. Croix Writers Colony, The Hollywood Creative Directory; eDivvy, Shopanista and Westside Websites
"In this prodigious work of scholarship, vast in scope and profound in its implications, Pincus challenges Macaulay and the orthodox view that the Glorious Revolution was moderate, peaceful, and conservative, and reveals a violent transformational event that revolutionized England''s state, church, and political economy, and introduced political modernity."-Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University
"In this remarkable work of scholarship, vast in scope and profound in its implications, Pincus challenges Macaulay and the orthodox view that the Glorious Revolution was moderate, peaceful, and conservative, and reveals a violent transformational event that revolutionized England''s state, church, and political economy, and introduced political modernity."-Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University
"In this remarkable work of scholarship, vast in scope and profound in its implications, Pincus challenges Macaulay and the orthodox view that the Glorious Revolution was moderate, peaceful, and conservative, and reveals a violent transformational event that revolutionized England''s state, church, and political economy, and introduced political modernity."�Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University
"In this remarkable work of scholarship, vast in scope and profound in its implications, Pincus challenges Macaulay and the orthodox view that the Glorious Revolution was moderate, peaceful, and conservative, and reveals a violent transformational event that revolutionized England''s state, church, and political economy, and introduced political modernity."Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University
"Meticulously researched and deftly written" -Andrew Stuttaford, National Review
"Meticulously researched and deftly written" �Andrew Stuttaford, National Review
"Meticulously researched and deftly written" Andrew Stuttaford, National Review
"Mr. Pincus's cogently argued account of what really happened during England's revolution destroys many comforting notions that have prevailed for more than 200 years.. It leaves the reader with something much more exciting: a new understanding of the origins of the modern, liberal state."--Economist
"Mr. Pincus's cogently argued account of what really happened during England's revolution destroys many comforting notions that have prevailed for more than 200 years.... It leaves the reader with something much more exciting: a new understanding of the origins of the modern, liberal state."-- Economist
�Mr. Pincus�s cogently argued account of what really happened during England�s revolution destroys many comforting notions that have prevailed for more than 200 years�. It leaves the reader with something much more exciting: a new understanding of the origins of the modern, liberal state.�--Economist
Named a Top 10 Book of 2010-- Wilson Quarterly
"One of the most ambitious works of history to appear in recent years--a radical reinterpretation of events that intends not merely to update and improve prior accounts but to vanquish them conclusively. The book is a marvel of scholarship."-- The National
"One of the most ambitious works of history to appear in recent years--a radical reinterpretation of events that intends not merely to update and improve prior accounts but to vanquish them conclusively. The book is a marvel of scholarship."--The National
�One of the most ambitious works of history to appear in recent years--a radical reinterpretation of events that intends not merely to update and improve prior accounts but to vanquish them conclusively. The book is a marvel of scholarship.�--The National
"The grand aspirations of this book and the broad sweep of its claims will insure that it is taken seriously by scholars working on the Glorious Revolution for years to come...It will stand out as the opening salvo in a series of historical batkes that wukk light up 1688 in newly vibrant tones."--Paul Monod, Journal of Church History
"The grand aspirations of this book and the broad sweep of its claims will insure that it is taken seriously by scholars working on the Glorious Revolution for years to come...It will stand out as the opening salvo in a series of historical batkes that wukk light up 1688 in newly vibrant tones."--Paul Monod,Journal of Church History
"There is much to be said for Pincus''s approach, blending economic and political theory together with seemingly effortless ease in a well-written and highly readable account...In the end, there is every reason to think that his analysis of the events of late-seventeenth-century England will, for want of a better term, revolutionize our understanding of the period."--Scott Hendrix, Canadian Journal of History
"Utterly extraordinary."-Don Herzog, University of Michigan
"Utterly extraordinary."�Don Herzog, University of Michigan
"Utterly extraordinary."Don Herzog, University of Michigan
"We all know that the year 1688 is a milestone in England''s history; now, thanks to Steve Pincus, the book 1688 will be a milestone in its historiography. Pincus transforms what once seemed a peaceful compromise among agreeable aristocrats into a fractious and all-encompassing crisis, the 'first modern revolution.' Provocative, erudite, and accessible, 1688 is a must read for anyone interested in seventeenth-century Europe and its possessions."-Cynthia Herrup, University of Southern California
�We all know that the year 1688 is a milestone in England''s history; now, thanks to Steve Pincus, the book 1688 will be a milestone in its historiography. Pincus transforms what once seemed a peaceful compromise among agreeable aristocrats into a fractious and all-encompassing crisis, the �first modern revolution.� Provocative, erudite, and accessible, 1688 is a must read for anyone interested in seventeenth-century Europe and its possessions.��Cynthia Herrup, University of Southern California
Winner of the 2010 Morris D. Forkosch Prize given by the American Historical Association
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, September 2009
Choice, July 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 has been underestimated, argues Steve Pincus. Showing how it represented an ideological break with the past, & setting the revolution in a broad international context, Pincus assesses the impact of 1688 & claims it was the first truly 'modern' revolution.
Main Description
For two hundred years historians have viewed England's Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 as an un-revolutionary revolution--bloodless, consensual, aristocratic, and above all, sensible. In this brilliant new interpretation Steve Pincus refutes this traditional view. By expanding the interpretive lens to include a broader geographical and chronological frame, Pincus demonstrates that England's revolution was a European event, that it took place over a number of years, not months, and that it had repercussions in India, North America, the West Indies, and throughout continental Europe. His rich historical narrative, based on masses of new archival research, traces the transformation of English foreign policy, religious culture, and political economy that, he argues, was the intended consequence of the revolutionaries of 1688-1689. James II developed a modernization program that emphasized centralized control, repression of dissidents, and territorial empire. The revolutionaries, by contrast, took advantage of the new economic possibilities to create a bureaucratic but participatory state. The postrevolutionary English state emphasized its ideological break with the past and envisioned itself as continuing to evolve. All of this, argues Pincus, makes the Glorious Revolution--not the French Revolution--the first truly modern revolution. This wide-ranging book reenvisions the nature of the Glorious Revolution and of revolutions in general, the causes and consequences of commercialization, the nature of liberalism, and ultimately the origins and contours of modernity itself.
Main Description
For two hundred years historians have viewed England's Glorious Revolution of 16881689 as an un-revolutionary revolutionbloodless, consensual, aristocratic, and above all, sensible. In this brilliant new interpretation Steve Pincus refutes this traditional view. By expanding the interpretive lens to include a broader geographical and chronological frame, Pincus demonstrates that England's revolution was a European event, that it took place over a number of years, not months, and that it had repercussions in India, North America, the West Indies, and throughout continental Europe. His rich historical narrative, based on masses of new archival research, traces the transformation of English foreign policy, religious culture, and political economy that, he argues, was the intended consequence of the revolutionaries of 16881689. James II developed a modernization program that emphasized centralized control, repression of dissidents, and territorial empire. The revolutionaries, by contrast, took advantage of the new economic possibilities to create a bureaucratic but participatory state. The postrevolutionary English state emphasized its ideological break with the past and envisioned itself as continuing to evolve. All of this, argues Pincus, makes the Glorious Revolutionnot the French Revolutionthe first truly modern revolution. This wide-ranging book reenvisions the nature of the Glorious Revolution and of revolutions in general, the causes and consequences of commercialization, the nature of liberalism, and ultimately the origins and contours of modernity itself.

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