Catalogue


Writing revolt : an engagement with African nationalism, 1957-67 /
Terence Ranger.
imprint
Harare, Simbabwe : Weaver Press ; Woodbridge, Suffolk : James Currey, c2013.
description
xii, 206 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
1847010717, 9781847010711
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Harare, Simbabwe : Weaver Press ; Woodbridge, Suffolk : James Currey, c2013.
isbn
1847010717
9781847010711
catalogue key
8833578
 
Includes bibliographic references (p. 191-203) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Terence Ranger is Emeritus Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, University of Oxford.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a deeply felt and engaging personal account of Zimbabwe's political awakening by one of its best-known historians, Terence Ranger.
Main Description
'I did not set out for Rhodesia as a radical' writes Terence Ranger. This memoir of the years between 1957, when he first went to Southern Rhodesia, and 1967 when he published his first book, is both an intimate record of the African awakening which Ranger witnessed during those ten years, and of the process which led him to write Revolt in Southern Rhodesia. Intended as both history and as historiography, Writing Revolt is also about the ways in which politics and history interacted. The men with whom Ranger discussed Zimbabwean history were the leaders of African nationalism; his seminar papers were sent to prisons and into restricted areas. Both they and he were making political as well as intellectual discoveries. The book also includes a brief account of Ranger's life before he went to Africa. TERENCE RANGER is Emeritus Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, University of Oxford. He is the author of Are we not also Men? (1995), Voices from the Rocks (1999) and Bulawayo Burning (2010), and co-editor of Violence and Memory (2000). Weaver Press: Zimbabwe and Southern Africa (South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Namibia)
Unpaid Annotation
A deeply felt and engaging personal account of Zimbabwe's political awakening by one of its best-known historians.
Main Description
Terry Ranger's last book, Bulawayo Burning, was published in 2010 over fifty years after his first arrival in Southern Rhodesia as a university teacher. He now reviews those early days in Writing Revolt. It is at once an eyewitness account of developing African nationalism, a vivid portrait of mid-century life in the country, and an explanation of how Ranger became the scholar he is. The intimacy and vivacity of the book are accentuated by Ranger's access to his own extensive correspondence, and to the remarkable diaries of his friend and university colleague, John Reed. Book jacket.
Main Description
'I did not set out for Rhodesia as a radical' writes Terry Ranger. Terry's memoir of the years between 1957, when he first went to Southern Rhodesia, and 1967 when he published his first book, is both an intimate record of the African awakening which Ranger witnessed during those ten years, and of the process which led him to write Revolt in Southern Rhodesia. Intended as both history and as historiography, Writing Revolt is also about the ways in which politics and history interacted. The men with whom Ranger discussed Zimbabwean history were the leaders of African nationalism; his seminar papers were sent to prisons and into restricted areas. Both they and he were making political as well as intellectual discoveries. The book also includes a brief account of Ranger's life before he went to Africa. TERENCE RANGER is Emeritus Rhodes Professor of Race Relations, University of Oxford. He is the author of Are we not also Men? (1995), Voices from the Rocks (1999) and Bulawayo Burning (2010), and co-editor of Violence and Memory (2000). Weaver Press: Zimbabwe and Southern Africa (South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Namibia)
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. vii
Prefacep. xi
1929-57 A Very Ordinary Boyp. 1
1957 The University College of Rhodesia and Nyasalandp. 14
1958 The Southern Rhodesian National Congressp. 27
1959 The Central African Emergenciesp. 39
1960 The National Democratic Partyp. 60
1962 Citizens Against the Colour Barp. 88
1962 The Zimbabwe African Peoples Unionp. 121
1963 and Afterwards: Deportation, The Nationalist Split, Dar es Salaam and Writing Revoltp. 149
Appendix of Namesp. 183
Select Referencesp. 191
Bibliographyp. 193
Indexp. 204
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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