Catalogue


The poetics of piracy : emulating Spain in English literature /
Barbara Fuchs.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2013.
description
186 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0812244753 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780812244755 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2013.
isbn
0812244753 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780812244755 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8829842
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [161]-173) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Learned, smart, and original. The questions that Fuchs addresses-national models of literature, ideological rivalry, and literary appropriation-should be of interest across periods and languages."-Walter Isaac Cohen, Cornell University
" The Poetics of Piracychallenges the hegemony of a nationalist English literary history that all too often ignores the rest of Europe, particularly Spain."-Karen Newman, Brown University
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Summaries
Main Description
Barbara Fuchs examines the paradoxes in the construction of Spain in relation to its Moorish heritage through an analysis of Spanish literature, costume, language, architecture, and chivalric practices from 1492 to 1609. The first English translation of two captivity plays by Cervantes, set in Algiers and Constantinople. Featuring a lively cast of corsairs, captives, and renegades, they offer important insights into early modern Spain's conception of the world of Islam. Book jacket.
Main Description
With its dominance as a European power and the explosion of its prose and dramatic writing, Spain provided an irresistible literary source for English writers of the early modern period. But the deep and escalating political rivalry between the two nations led English writers to negotiate, disavow, or attempt to resolve their fascination with Spain and their debt to Spanish sources. Amid thorny issues of translation and appropriation, imperial competition, the rise of commercial authorship, and anxieties about authenticity, Barbara Fuchs traces how Spanish material was transmitted into English writing, entangling English literature in questions of national and religious identity, and how piracy came to be a central textual metaphor, with appropriations from Spain triumphantly reimagined as heroic looting. From the time of the attempted invasion by the Spanish Armada of the 1580s, through the rise of anti-Spanish rhetoric of the 1620s, The Poetics of Piracycharts this connection through works by Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, and Thomas Middleton. Fuchs examines how their writing, particularly for the stage, recasts a reliance on Spanish material by constructing narratives of militaristic, forcible use. She considers how Jacobean dramatists complicated the texts of their Spanish contemporaries by putting them to anti-Spanish purposes, and she traces the place of Cervantes's Don Quixotein Beaumont's The Knight of the Burning Pestleand Shakespeare's late, lost play Cardenio. English literature was deeply transnational, even in the period most closely associated with the birth of a national literature. Recovering the profound influence of Spain on Renaissance English letters, The Poetics of Piracypaints a sophisticated picture of how nations can serve, at once, as rivals and resources.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From the time of the attempted invasion by the Spanish Armada of the 1580s, through the rise of anti-Spanish rhetoric of the 1620s, this book charts this connection through works by Ben Jonson, William Shakespeare, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, and Thomas Middleton.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Forcible Translationp. 13
Knights and Merchantsp. 39
Plotting Spaniards, Spanish Plotsp. 55
Cardenio Lost and Foundp. 79
Cardenios for Our Timep. 98
Notesp. 131
Bibliographyp. 161
Indexp. 175
Acknowledgmentsp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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