Catalogue


Comedy, caricature and the social order, 1820-50 /
Brian Maidment.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2013.
description
x, 244 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719075262 (hbk.), 9780719075261 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2013.
isbn
0719075262 (hbk.)
9780719075261 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8824163
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [231]-239) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brian Maidment is Professor of the History of Print Culture in the English Department at Liverpool John Moores University
Summaries
Main Description
Offering an overview of the marketplace for comic images between 1820 and 1850, this book makes a case for the interest and importance of a largely neglected area of visual culture. It considers the impact on the development of print culture of the emergent, but soon widespread, use of lithography and wood engraving, both capable of integrating texts and images cheaply and imaginatively on the printed page. Drawing on a wide range of commercially produced print genres, including song books, play-texts, comic annuals and magazines as well as single plate and series of caricatures, this book traces the ways in which Regency and early Victorian visual humor both sustains some of the characteristics of an earlier caricature tradition while also beginning to develop new ways of analyzing and coping with social change through comic forms and genres.
Main Description
Offering an overview of the marketplace for comic images between 1820 and 1850, this book makes a case for the interest and importance of a largely neglected area of visual culture. It considers the impact on the development of print culture of the emergent, but soon widespread, use of lithography and wood engraving, both capable of integrating texts and images cheaply and imaginatively on the printed page. Drawing on a wide range of commercially produced print genres, including song books, play-texts, comic annuals and magazines as well as single plate and series of caricatures, this book traces the ways in which Regency and early Victorian visual humour both sustains some of the characteristics of an earlier caricature tradition while also beginning to develop new ways of analyzing and coping with social change through comic forms and genres.
Long Description
Offering an overview of the market place for comic images between 1820 and 1850, this considers the impact on the development of print culture of the emergent, but soon widespread, use of lithography and wood engraving. Drawing on a wide range of commercially produced print genres, including song books, play-texts, comic annuals and magazines as well as single plate and series of caricatures, this book traces the ways in which Regency and early Victorian visual humour both sustains some of the characteristics of an earlier caricature tradition while also beginning to develop new ways of analyzing and coping with social change through comic forms and genres. Beginning with an overview of the range of media, modes and genres that artists, engravers, publishers and entrepreneurs of print culture used in pursuit of wide readerships, the book discusses contemporary theories of humour in some detail and challenges the generally condescending response that art and social historians have offered to such material. The second half of the book is built upon four detailed case studies of related groups of images produced in the period, through which the broader arguments made in the first half of the book are subjected to more thorough scrutiny. The book is aimed at a broad range of scholars and students across art history, social history, cultural studies and literature.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Regency and early Victorian graphic humour - modes and markets
Graphic bric-a-brac? Approaching early nineteenth century graphic humourp. 3
Regency visual culture in the marketplacep. 30
Continuity, innovation and change: comic visual culture 1820-1850p. 47
The social vision of Regency and early Victorian comic visual culture
Reflections in a print shop window: from street theatre to crime scenep. 113
Robert Seymour: a jobbing artist in the marketplacep. 144
The 'march of intellect' as a comic event: mockery, heroism and social changep. 177
Revisiting the Regency - Punch's dustmenp. 209
Appendix: Satirical title pages 1832-1835p. 229
Bibliographyp. 231
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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