Catalogue


Standing by the republic : 50 Dáil debates that shaped the nation /
John Drennan.
imprint
Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, c2012.
description
viii, 292 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
071715291X (hbk.), 9780717152919 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, c2012.
isbn
071715291X (hbk.)
9780717152919 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8806765
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [280]-282) and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter

‘No matter what I do I shall never catch up with him to the end of my public life.’
John A. Costelo on Noël Browne and the Mother and Child Scheme fallout

‘I believe that national progress of any kind depends largely on an upsurge of patriotism—a revival of patriotism, if you will—directed towards constructive purposes.’
Seán Lemass on becoming Taoiseach in 1959

‘For the second time in the past half century, in our long and chequered history, this country and our people may thank God that they have this party to maintain and defend and assertthe people’s rights.’
 iam Cosgrave on the Arms Crisis

‘Nobody enjoys paying income tax, and some tend to dramatise the collection of tax properly due as a struggle between the citizens and the Revenue.’
Charles Haughey’s first budget speech

‘This debate essentially is about the evil spirit that controls one political party in this Republic, and it is about the way in which that spirit has begun to corrupt the entire political system in our country.’
Dick Spring on Charles Haughey, 1990

Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Dail Eireann is the crucible where great debates shape the future of the state and tell us where we are now and where we are going. It serves as the focus of public debate and public concern. In this book John Drennan recalls 50 of the most dramatic and important such debates since 1948.
Main Description
Although the book covers a time period going back as far as World War II, most of the key moments are from after 1960 such as the arrival of Lemass, the introduction of free education by Donagh O'Malley and the reform of the censorship laws. The wars in the 70's and 80's about divorce, abortion and the Arms Trial are indicative of the arrival of a darker era of uncertainty all of which was accentuated by the sulphurous elevation of Mr Haughey to office and the subsequent great corruption wars. The 90s had the debate on the Fr Brendan Smyth affair that collapsed the Albert Reynolds government and Dail debates in more recent years have been dominated by the Peace Process and the economic crisis. This book is not simply a narrative of speeches. It captures the culture that shaped these moments of national drama. Each chapter begins with a synopsis of the events preceding the debate, the debate itself and its outcome. In this book, John Drennan captures the story of Ireland's evolution in the seven decades since the end of the war.
Main Description
Dail Eireann is the crucible where great debates shape the future of the Irish state. It serves as the focus of public debate and public concern. In this book John Drennan recalls fifty of the most dramatic and important such debates since 1948.
Main Description
Dail Eireann is the crucible where great debates shape the future of the state and tell us where we are now and where we are going. It serves as the focus of public debate and public concern. In this book John Drennan recalls fifty of the most dramatic and important such debates since 1948. Although the book covers a time period going back as far as World War II, most of the key moments are from after 1960 such as the arrival of Lemass, the introduction of free education by Donagh O'Malley and the reform of the censorship laws. The wars in the 70's and 80's about divorce, abortion and the Arms Trial are indicative of the arrival of a darker era of uncertainty all of which was accentuated by the sulphurous elevation of Mr Haughey to office and the subsequent great corruption wars. The 90s had the debate on the Fr Brendan Smyth affair that collapsed the Albert Reynolds government and Dail debates in more recent years have been dominated by the Peace Process and the economic crisis. This book is not simply a narrative of speeches. It captures the culture that shaped these moments of national drama. Each chapter begins with a synopsis of the events preceding the debate, the debate itself and its outcome. John Drennan, in his trademark witty style, captures the story of Ireland's evolution in the seven decades since the end of the war.
Main Description
From the debates of the 1950s that were strikingly similar to what we face today-struggles against bankruptcy, emigration and abuse of power by the State-through the wars in the 70s and 80s about divorce, abortion and to the Jacobean dramas surrounding the fall of Haughey in the 1990s, this book finally traces the fall of the first Republic via the tragic-comic dénouement of the Cowen era and the first breaths of hope provided by a new administration. John Drennan captures the fascinating story of Ireland's evolution in the seven decades since the end of the war and encapsulates the culture that shaped these moments of national drama.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Hopeful Forties, Hungry Fiftiesp. 5
'Doomed be damned': Dev loses power and the sky doesn't fall in, 18 February 1948p. 7
Keeping the past for pride as Mr Costello declares the Republic, 24 November 1948p. 14
Protecting mothers and children? Not in our Republic, thank you, 12 April 1951p. 20
The Duke of Plaza Toro returns, leading from behind, 13 June 1951p. 28
Suffer the little children … in blind indifference, 23 April 1954p. 33
Dev steps out, Costello steps in again, 2 June 1954p. 37
'National progress has halted': Lemass addresses the state of the nation, 13 December 1956p. 42
Hoping for an 'upsurge of patriotism': Mr Lemass is chosen, 23 June 1959p. 48
After the Lost Decade New Hope Blossoms… But Old Problems Scowlp. 53
A turn to the left: Lemass leads on, 23 April 1963p. 55
In the 'affluent society' even the undeserving poor deserve justice, 12 October 1966p. 61
The reluctant Taoiseach takes to the pitch, 10 November 1966p. 65
'So charming as to be dangerous', 30 November 1966p. 71
The Revenue are not the enemy: Mr Haughey's first budget, 11 April 1967p. 76
Hot Dames on Cold Slabs: The beginning of the end of the age of censorship, 10 May 1967p. 81
Oliver J. Flanagan's fishy tale, 8 November 1967p. 86
Enter Haughey After Jack Secures Too Much of the Love of the Peoplep. 91
The Arms Crisis: A state and a party confront the enemy within, 6-8 May 1970p. 93
Jack's 'exercise in persuasion', 21 March 1972p. 100
The original Quiet Man comes to power, 14 March 1973p. 105
Honest Jack gobbles the lot as John Kelly plays Nostradamus, 5 July 1977p. 110
'Tis an 'Irish solution to an Irish problem', 28 February 1979p. 114
Mr Haughey 'comes with a flawed pedigree', 11 December 1979p. 119
The Horrid Eighties and the Great Age of Gubup. 125
'I found my foot in some; strange doors last week', 30 June 1981p. 127
Ephemeral creations bring down the best Government we never had, 27 January 1982p. 131
A duo of despair, 9 March 1982 and 14 December 1982p. 136
Dessie O'Malley stands by the Republic, 14 February 1985p. 141
Frankenstein's monster and Pee Flynn stalk the land, 14 May 1986p. 146
Mac the Knife confronts Ireland's economic crisis, 31 March 1987p. 152
'A further significant development in the political degeneration of Fianna Fáil', 12 July 1989p. 157
An Evil Spirit Leaves and a Ward Boss Comesp. 163
An evil spirit governs the Republic, 31 October 1990p. 165
'I have done the state some service', 11 February 1992p. 171
Hollow, nervous laughter as they pass the graveyard, 11 February 1992p. 175
A bit of a shock as Bruton 'rises as a phoenix', 25 December 1994p. 179
We are in surplus: Labour's last budget, 22 January 1997p. 185
A rat in an anorak or a humble nort' side Dub? 26 June 1997p. 189
Ray Burke draws a line in the sand, 10 September 1997p. 193
Bertie sees the Ghost of Tribunals Future, 7 October 1997p. 198
Drinking champagne as Charlie McCreevy becomes midwife to the Celtic Tiger, 3 December 1997p. 203
Hope and history walk hand in hand, 21 April 1998p. 208
The apotheosis of the dragon's teeth of terrorism, 2 September 1998p. 213
Death of the Republicp. 217
A man in full: Bertie leaps the second hurdle, 6 June 2002p. 219
McCreevy's last hurrah turns into a handful of dust, 3 December 2003p. 224
Appeasement challenged: Enda comes of age, 8 February 2005p. 229
Three-in-a-row secured as death by tribunal waits, 14 June 2007p. 234
'This is a wonderful country, and we are a fortunate people': Seeing through a glass darkly as Brian Cowen becomes Taoiseach, 7 May 2008p. 239
Handing over the deeds of the country to bail out the banks, 30 September 2008p. 244
Ireland has 'turned the corner', 9 December 2009p. 252
Darkness falls, 23 November 2010p. 257
'Where do we leave our cvs for all these jobs?' 19 January 2011p. 264
Mr Cowen sips from the bitter cup for a final time, 1 February 2011p. 269
Epiloguep. 273
Hanging out our brightest colours for Enda, 9 March 2011p. 275
Bibliographyp. 280
Indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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