Catalogue


Richard Bancroft and Elizabethan anti-Puritanism /
Patrick Collinson.
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xvii, 232 p.
ISBN
1107023343 (hardback), 9781107023345 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
1107023343 (hardback)
9781107023345 (hardback)
abstract
"This major new study is an exploration of the Elizabethan Puritan movement through the eyes of its most determined and relentless opponent, Richard Bancroft, later Archbishop of Canterbury. It analyses his obsession with the perceived threat to the stability of the church and state presented by the advocates of radical presbyterian reform. The book forensically examines Bancroft's polemical tracts and archive of documents and letters, casting important new light on religious politics and culture"--
catalogue key
8806750
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This major new study is an exploration of the Elizabethan Puritan movement through the eyes of its most determined and relentless opponent, Richard Bancroft, later Archbishop of Canterbury. It analyses his obsession with the perceived threat to the stability of the church and state presented by the advocates of radical presbyterian reform. The book forensically examines Bancroft's polemical tracts and archive of documents and letters, casting important new light on religious politics and culture. Focussing on the ways in which anti-Puritanism interacted with Puritanism, it also illuminates the process by which religious identities were forged in the early modern era. The final book of Patrick Collinson, the pre-eminent historian of sixteenth-century England, this is the culmination of a lifetime of seminal work on the English Reformation and its ramifications.
Description for Bookstore
This major new study explores the Elizabethan Puritan movement through the eyes of its most determined and relentless opponent, Richard Bancroft, later Archbishop of Canterbury. It analyses his obsession with the perceived threat to the stability of the church and state presented by the advocates of radical presbyterian reform.
Library of Congress Summary
"This major new study is an exploration of the Elizabethan Puritan movement through the eyes of its most determined and relentless opponent, Richard Bancroft, later Archbishop of Canterbury. It analyses his obsession with the perceived threat to the stability of the church and state presented by the advocates of radical presbyterian reform. The book forensically examines Bancroft's polemical tracts and archive of documents and letters, casting important new light on religious politics and culture"--
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study explores the Elizabethan Puritan movement through the eyes of its most determined and relentless opponent, Richard Bancroft, later Archbishop of Canterbury. It analyses his obsession with the perceived threat to the stability of the Church and state presented by the advocates of radical presbyterian reform.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Beginnings
Battle commences
The 1580s: Whitgift, Hatton and the High Commission
Martin Marprelate
What Bancroft found, and didn't find, in the godly ministers' studies
Out of the frying pan, into the fire and out again
Prayer, fasting, and the world of spirits: the other face
Possession, dispossession, fraud and polemics
Richard Bancroft, Robert Cecil and the Jesuits: the Bishop and his Catholic friends
Archbishop of Canterbury
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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