Catalogue


Waking from the dream : Mexico's middle classes after 1968 /
Louise E. Walker.
imprint
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, 2013.
description
xviii, 321 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0804781516 (cloth), 9780804781510 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0804781516 (cloth)
9780804781510 (cloth)
contents note
Introduction : the middle classes and the crisis of the institutional revolution -- Rebel generation : being a middle-class radical, 1971-1976 -- Cacerolazo : rumors, gossip, and the conservative middle classes, 1973-1976 -- The power of petrĂ³leo : black gold and middle-class noir, 1977-1982 -- Consumer-citizens : inflation, credit, and taxing the middle classes, 1973-1985 -- La crisis : on the front lines of austerity and apertura, 1981-1988 -- Earthquake : civil society in the rubble of Tlatelolco, 1985-1988 -- Conclusion : the debris of a miracle.
catalogue key
8788364
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-308) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Louise E. Walker is Assistant Professor of History at Northeastern University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is an important work. Walker makes careful use of her sources to explain carefully how and why activism increased in the middle class during the late 20th century."--Linda B. Hall, University of New Mexico
"A very lively and most interesting read, on a topic which has received a disgraceful lack of attention-- the author taps a rich new vein."--Barry Carr, La Trobe University and ANCLAS: Australian National University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
When the postwar boom began to dissipate in the late 1960s, Mexico's middle classes awoke to a new, economically terrifying world. And following massacres of students at peaceful protests in 1968 and 1971, one-party control of Mexican politics dissipated as well. The ruling Party of the Institutional Revolution struggled to recover its legitimacy, but instead saw its support begin to erode. In the following decades, Mexico's middle classes ended up shaping the history of economic and political crisis, facilitating the emergence of neo-liberalism and the transition to democracy. Waking from the Dreamtells the story of this profound change from state-led development to neo-liberalism, and from a one-party state to electoral democracy. It describes the fraught history of these tectonic shifts, as politicians and citizens experimented with different strategies to end a series of crises. In the first study to dig deeply into the drama of the middle classes in this period, Walker shows how the most consequential struggles over Mexico's economy and political system occurred between the middle classes and the ruling party.
Main Description
When the postwar boom began to dissipate in the late 1960s, Mexico's middle classes awoke to a new, economically terrifying world. And following massacres of students at peaceful protests in 1968 and 1971, one-party control of Mexican politics dissipated as well. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party struggled to recover its legitimacy, but instead saw its support begin to erode. In the following decades, Mexico's middle classes ended up shaping the history of economic and political crisis, facilitating the emergence of neo-liberalism and the transition to democracy. Waking from the Dreamtells the story of this profound change from state-led development to neo-liberalism, and from a one-party state to electoral democracy. It describes the fraught history of these tectonic shifts, as politicians and citizens experimented with different strategies to end a series of crises. In the first study to dig deeply into the drama of the middle classes in this period, Walker shows how the most consequential struggles over Mexico's economy and political system occurred between the middle classes and the ruling party.
Bowker Data Service Summary
When the postwar boom began to dissipate in the 1960s, Mexico's middle classes awoke to an economically terrifying world. And following massacres of students at peaceful protests in 1968 and 1971, one-party control of Mexican politics dissipated as well. The ruling Party of the Institutional Revolution struggled to recover its legitimacy. This title tells the story of this profound change from state-led development to neo-liberalism, and from a one-party state to electoral democracy.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introduction: The Middle Classes and the Crisis of the Institutional Revolutionp. 1
Upheavalsp. 21
Rebel Generation: Being a Middle-Class Radical, 1971-1976p. 23
Cacerolazo: Rumors, Gossip, and the Conservative Middle Classes, 1973-1976p. 45
The Debt Economyp. 73
The Power of PetrĂ³leo: Black Gold and Middle-Class Noir, 1977-1981p. 75
Consumer-Citizens: Inflation, Credit, and Taxing the Middle Classes, 1973-1985p. 105
Fault Lines of Neoliberalismp. 141
La Crisis: On the Front Lines of Austerity and Apertura, 1981-1988p. 143
Earthquake: Civil Society in the Rubble of Tlatelolco, 1985-1988p. 173
Conclusion: The Debris of a Miraclep. 201
Appendix: Quantifying the Middle Classesp. 209
Notesp. 217
Bibliographyp. 283
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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