Catalogue

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True relations : reading, literature, and evidence in seventeenth-century England /
Frances E. Dolan.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2013.
description
vi, 331 p. : ill. ; cm.
ISBN
0812244850 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780812244854 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2013.
isbn
0812244850 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780812244854 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8788336
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
" True RelationsB pairs a methodological inquiry with historical analysis of specific case histories connecting fact to fiction in the early modern period. No book to date has traced the particular way that scholars of the early modern period devise a practice of reading once they affirm the axiom that the 'real' is constructed. Dolan offers an unusually lucid and crisp tour of the social stakes involved in reading strategies and evidentiary standards."-Wendy Wall, Northwestern University
" True RelationsÃ' pairs a methodological inquiry with historical analysis of specific case histories connecting fact to fiction in the early modern period. No book to date has traced the particular way that scholars of the early modern period devise a practice of reading once they affirm the axiom that the 'real' is constructed. Dolan offers an unusually lucid and crisp tour of the social stakes involved in reading strategies and evidentiary standards."-Wendy Wall, Northwestern University
" True Relations pairs a methodological inquiry with historical analysis of specific case histories connecting fact to fiction in the early modern period. No other book to date has traced the particular way that scholars of the early modern period devise a practice of reading once they affirm the axiom that the 'real' is constructed. Dolan offers an unusually lucid and crisp tour of the social stakes involved in reading strategies and evidentiary standards."-Wendy Wall, Northwestern University
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume pairs a methodological inquiry with historical analysis of specific case histories connecting fact to fiction in the early modern period. It traces the particular way that scholars of the early modern period devise a practice of reading once they affirm the axiom that the 'real' is constructed. Dolan offers an unusually lucid and crisp tour of the social stakes involved in reading strategies and evidentiary standards.
Main Description
In the motley ranks of seventeenth-century print, one often comes upon the title True Relation. Purportedly true relations describe monsters, miracles, disasters, crimes, trials, and apparitions. They also convey discoveries achieved through exploration or experiment. Contemporaries relied on such accounts for access to information even as they distrusted them; scholars today share both their dependency and their doubt. What we take as evidence, Frances E. Dolan argues, often raises more questions than it answers. Although historians have tracked dramatic changes in evidentiary standards and practices in the period, these changes did not solve the problem of how to interpret true relations or ease the reliance on them. The burden remains on readers. Dolan connects early modern debates about textual evidence to recent discussions of the value of seventeenth-century texts as historical evidence. Then as now, she contends, literary techniques of analysis have proven central to staking and assessing truth claims. She addresses the kinds of texts that circulated about three traumatic events-the Gunpowder Plot, witchcraft prosecutions, and the London Fire-and looks at legal depositions, advice literature, and plays as genres of evidence that hover in a space between fact and fiction. Even as doubts linger about their documentary and literary value, scholars rely heavily on them. Confronting and exploring these doubts, Dolan makes a case for owning up to our agency in crafting true relations among the textual fragments that survive.
Table of Contents
Note on Spellingp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Crises of Evidence
True and Perfect Relations: Henry Garnet, Confessional Identity, and Figurationp. 29
Sham Stories and Credible Relations: Witchcraft and Narrative Conventionsp. 52
A True and Faithful Account? The London Fire, Blame, and Partisan Proofp. 87
Genres of Evidence
First-Person Relations: Reading Depositionsp. 111
The Rule of Relation: Domestic Advice Literature and Its Readersp. 154
Relational Truths: Dramatic Evidence, All Is True, and Double Falsehoodp. 202
Notesp. 247
Indexp. 315
Acknowledgmentsp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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