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Popular reading in English c.1400-1600 /
Elisabeth Salter.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2012.
description
x, 260 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0719077990 (hbk.), 9780719077999 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2012.
isbn
0719077990 (hbk.)
9780719077999 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8785075
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-255) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elisabeth Salter is Lecturer in the Department of English and Creative Writing, Aberystwyth University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Elisabeth Salter's book . . . deals with perhaps the most exciting period in relation to the history of reading in England . . . it is a pleasure to follow the close attention she lavishes on such under-appreciated material as the Gesta Romanorum in her chapter on 'moral reading' . . . the care with which she outlines her methods and defines her terms is also eminently laudable and sets her study apart from the broader approaches to the history of reading."Mary C. Flannery, The TLS, 28th June 2013
This item was reviewed in:
The Times (London), June 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text is about reading practice and experience in late medieval and early modern England. It focuses on the kinds of literatures that were more readily available to the widest spectrum of the population.
Main Description
This book is about reading practice and experience in late medieval and early modern England. It focuses on the kinds of literatures that were more readily available to the widest spectrum of the population. Four case studies from many possibilities have been selected, each examining a particular type of popular literature under the headings #145;religious#146;, #145;moral#146;, #145;practical#146; and #145;fictional#146;. A key concern of the book is how we might use particular types of evidence in order to understand more about reading practice and experience, so issues of method and approach are discussed fully in the opening chapter. One distinctive element of this book is that it attempts to uncover evidence for the reading practices and experiences of real, rather than ideal, readers, using evidence that is found within the material of a book or manuscript itself, or within the structure of a specific genre of literature. Salter attempts to negotiate a path through a set of methodological and interpretive issues in order to arrive at a better understanding of how people may have read and what they may have read. This, in turn, leads on to how we may interpret the evidence that manuscripts and early printed books provide for the ways that medieval and early modern people engaged with reading. This book will be of interest to academics and research students who study the history of reading, popular culture, literacy, manuscript and print culture, as well as to those interested more generally in medieval and early modern society and culture.
Main Description
This book is about reading practice and experience in late medieval and early modern England. It focuses on the kinds of literatures that were more readily available to the widest spectrum of the population. Four case studies from many possibilities have been selected, each examining a particular type of popular literature under the headings 'religious', 'moral', 'practical' and 'fictional'. A key concern of the book is how we might use particular types of evidence in order to understand more about reading practice and experience, so issues of method and approach are discussed fully in the opening chapter.One distinctive element of this book is that it attempts to uncover evidence for the reading practices and experiences of real, rather than ideal, readers, using evidence that is found within the material of a book or manuscript itself, or within the structure of a specific genre of literature. Salter attempts to negotiate a path through a set of methodological and interpretive issues in order to arrive at a better understanding of how people may have read and what they may have read. This, in turn, leads on to how we may interpret the evidence that manuscripts and early printed books provide for the ways that medieval and early modern people engaged with reading.This book will be of interest to academics and research students who study the history of reading, popular culture, literacy, manuscript and print culture, as well as to those interested more generally in medieval and early modern society and culture.
Main Description
This book is about reading practice and experience in late medieval and early modern England. It focuses on the kinds of literatures that were more readily available to the widest spectrum of the population. Four case studies from many possibilities have been selected, each examining a particular type of popular literature under the headings "religious," "moral," "practical," and "fictional." A key concern of the book is how we might use particular types of evidence in order to understand more about reading practice and experience, so issues of method and approach are discussed fully in the opening chapter. One distinctive element of this book is that it attempts to uncover evidence for the reading practices and experiences of real, rather than ideal, readers, using evidence that is found within the material of a book or manuscript itself, or within the structure of a specific genre of literature. Salter attempts to negotiate a path through a set of methodological and interpretive issues in order to arrive at a better understanding of how people may have read and what they may have read. This, in turn, leads on to how we may interpret the evidence that manuscripts and early printed books provide for the ways that medieval and early modern people engaged with reading.This book will be of interest to academics and research students who study the history of reading, popular culture, literacy, manuscript, and print culture, as well as to those interested more generally in medieval and early modern society and culture.
Main Description
This book is about reading practice and experience in late medieval and early modern England. It focuses on the kinds of literatures that were more readily available to the widest spectrum of the population. Four case studies from many possibilities have been selected, each examining a particular type of popular literature under the headings "religious," "moral," "practical," and "fictional." A key concern of the book is how we might use particular types of evidence in order to understand more about reading practice and experience, so issues of method and approach are discussed fully in the opening chapter.One distinctive element of this book is that it attempts to uncover evidence for the reading practices and experiences of real, rather than ideal, readers, using evidence that is found within the material of a book or manuscript itself, or within the structure of a specific genre of literature. Salter attempts to negotiate a path through a set of methodological and interpretive issues in order to arrive at a better understanding of how people may have read and what they may have read. This, in turn, leads on to how we may interpret the evidence that manuscripts and early printed books provide for the ways that medieval and early modern people engaged with reading.This book will be of interest to academics and research students who study the history of reading, popular culture, literacy, manuscript, and print culture, as well as to those interested more generally in medieval and early modern society and culture.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of illustrationsp. ix
Introduction to methods and termsp. 1
Religious reading and reformp. 47
Making meaning from moral readingp. 93
Practical texts: husbandry and carvingp. 137
Fictional literature: Gawain in a Middle English miscellanyp. 177
Conclusionp. 224
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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