Catalogue


British diplomacy and US hegemony in Cuba, 1898-1964 /
Christopher Hull, Lecturer, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, University of Nottingham.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
description
ix, 291 p.
ISBN
0230295444 (hbk.), 9780230295445 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, c2013
isbn
0230295444 (hbk.)
9780230295445 (hbk.)
contents note
Perfidious Albion? : Britain and Cuba before 1898 -- Uncle Sam versus the British lion -- World War I to boom and bust -- Beyond recognition : Grau's government -- Sugar and the Anglo-Cuban Commercial Treaty -- World War II : sugar without cigars -- Cold war : democracy to dictatorship -- Revolution : Anglo-American cooperation -- Shipping, the missile crisis and buses.
catalogue key
8785018
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 264-279).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher Hull obtained his doctorate from the University of Nottingham, UK, in 2009. He has taught in the university's Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies since 2004 and is an active member of its Centre for Research on Cuba.
Summaries
Main Description
Utilizing a wealth of British diplomatic records and other sources this study offers fresh insights into the whole period of US political and economic domination in Cuba from 1898 until the eventful early period of the Cuban Revolution after 1959, when the hitherto close US'"Cuban relationship fell apart. It investigates two British attempts to agree a commercial treaty with Cuba, and the contentious sales of arms and Leyland buses before and after the Fidel Castro-led Revolution. The book outlines Britain's economic decline through two world wars, but also the country's importance as a second market for Cuban sugar and cigar exports. It demonstrates how British governments and diplomats in Havana sought to protect their interests in Cuba, including railway and insurance companies, always sensitive to the reactions of the United States '" a vital transatlantic ally with a significant stake in the Caribbean island.
Bowker Data Service Summary
An analysis of Cuba's history from a British diplomatic perspective during the period of U.S. political and economic domination, from 1898 to 1964. It investigates how Britain attempted to protect its trade and other interests in the island, whilst always sensitive to the reactions of its most important all, the U.S.
Main Description
Utilizing a wealth of British diplomatic records and other sources, Our Diplomats in Havana offers fresh insights into the whole period of U.S. political and economic domination in Cuba from 1898, as well as the fractious early period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 when the hitherto close U.S.-Cuban relationship fell apart. Case studies include two British attempts to agree a commercial treaty with Cuba, and the contentious sale of arms and Leyland buses before and following the Fidel Castro-led Revolution. The study outlines Britain's decline through two world wars, but also its importance as a second market for Cuban sugar and cigars. It demonstrates how both various British governments and successive diplomats in Havana sought to protect their interests in Cuba, including railway and insurance companies, always sensitive to the reactions of the United States - a vital transatlantic ally with a significant stake in the Caribbean island.
Main Description
Utilizing a wealth of British diplomatic records and other sources, Our Diplomats in Havana offers fresh insights into the whole period of U.S. political and economic domination in Cuba from 1898, as well as the fractious early period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 when the hitherto close U.S.-Cuban relationship fell apart. Case studies include two British attempts to agree a commercial treaty with Cuba, and the contentious sale of arms and Leyland buses before and following the Fidel Castro-led Revolution. The study outlines Britain's decline through two world wars, but also its importance as a second market for Cuban sugar and cigars. It demonstrates how both various British governments and successive diplomats in Havana sought to protect their interests in Cuba, including railway and insurance companies, always sensitive to the reactions of the United States a vital transatlantic ally with a significant stake in the Caribbean island.
Main Description
Utilizing a wealth of British diplomatic records and other sources this study offers fresh insights into the whole period of US political and economic domination in Cuba from 1898 until the eventful early period of the Cuban Revolution after 1959, when the hitherto close USa "Cuban relationship fell apart. It investigates two British attempts to agree a commercial treaty with Cuba, and the contentious sales of arms and Leyland buses before and after the Fidel Castro-led Revolution. The book outlines Britain's economic decline through two world wars, but also the country's importance as a second market for Cuban sugar and cigar exports. It demonstrates how British governments and diplomats in Havana sought to protect their interests in Cuba, including railway and insurance companies, always sensitive to the reactions of the United States a " a vital transatlantic ally with a significant stake in the Caribbean island.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Illustrationp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Perfidious Albion? Britain and Cuba before 1898p. 15
Uncle Sam versus the British Lionp. 34
The First World War to Boom and Bustp. 55
Beyond Recognition: Grau's 100-Day Governmentp. 76
Sugar and the Anglo-Cuban Commercial Treatyp. 98
The Second World War: Sugar without Cigarsp. 117
Cold War: Democracy to Dictatorshipp. 131
Revolution: Anglo-American Cooperationp. 154
Shipping, the Missile Crisis and Busesp. 178
Conclusionp. 201
Notesp. 214
Bibliographyp. 264
Indexp. 280
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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