Catalogue


The war of American Independence, 1775-1783 /
Richard Middleton.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Harlow ; New York : Pearson, 2012.
description
xvi, 351 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0582229421 (pbk.), 9780582229426 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow ; New York : Pearson, 2012.
isbn
0582229421 (pbk.)
9780582229426 (pbk.)
catalogue key
8784374
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [328]-337) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard Middleton was for many years Lecturer and Reader in American History at Queen's University Belfast. Among his various publications are The Bells of Victory: The Pitt-Newcastle Ministry and the Conduct of the Seven Years' War, 1757-1762 (Cambridge University Press, 1985 and 2002), Colonial America: A History to 1763 (Blackwell, 1992, 1996, 2002 (and 2011 with Anne Lombard) and Pontiac's War: Its Causes, Course and Consequences (Routledge, 2007). He is now an independent writer and scholar.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
‘This is an authoritative and up-to-date assessment of the twists and turns of war and diplomacy through which thirteen former British colonies gained their independence. The complex story is narrated with exemplary clarity and the measured judgements will command wide respect. The extended treatment given to the war on the frontiers, whose outcome was to be of the utmost importance to the native peoples of America, is a most welcome feature.' Peter Marshall, Professor Emeritus of History, King's College London ‘This fresh synthesis offers a clear narrative and shrewd assessment of a seemingly interminable struggle between very different British and American forces, both hobbled by inadequate resources, lame strategies, and flawed leadership. Middleton convincingly argues that this exhausting contest was finally ended only by a dramatic, if widely under-appreciated, French naval intervention at Yorktown.' Ian K. Steele, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Western Ontario ‘Middleton's account of the American Revolution not only successfully places the rebellion in a broad Atlantic context, but also reminds us that what government leaders at the time called military strategy was largely the product of ignorance and incompetence.' T. H. Breen, Professor of American History, Northwestern University The War of American Independence is rightly seen as one of the most important conflicts of the eighteenth century, with continuing consequences for the world today. Initially Britain viewed the struggle as no more than the suppression of a minor revolt instigated by a few unscrupulous men, being convinced that most colonists remained loyal to their empire and monarch. But wars rarely turn out as expected. While Britain viewed the conflict as one that could not be lost, the white majority in America similarly believed in the justice of their cause and also felt that they would prevail. In consequence, the British found themselves enmeshed in a conflict which they did not understand and to which they had few answers. The entry of France, and then Spain, into the war further diminished Britain's chances, diverting their resources to the defence of the Channel, Gibraltar, Minorca, the West Indies, and trade with the rest of the world. Although George III and his ministers stubbornly held on to the belief that the American Patriots and their allies would eventually tire of the struggle, the reality was that Britaindid not have the resources to fight a war on two continents. After years of indecisive sparring, the knockout blow was eventually delivered by France at Yorktown in the autumn in 1781, allowing the formation of the most significant new nation in the modern world. In his fascinating new book, Richard Middleton provides a perceptive, comprehensive and engaging account of this complex conflict. Taking a broader view, he uncovers the fragile nature of the American Patriot cause and investigates the crucial importance of France and Spain to the achievement of the War of American Independence. Ideal for students of American history, war/peace studies, international relations and eighteenth century politics, this impressive study will provide knowledge and insight to anyone with a general interest in the strategic direction, conduct and outcomes of the American War of Independence. Richard Middleton was for many years Lecturer and Reader in American History at Queen's University, Belfast. Among his various publications are The Bells of Victory: The Pitt-Newcastle Ministry and the Conduct of the Seven Years' War, 1757-1762 (Cambridge University Press, 1985 and 2002), Colonial America: A History to 1763 (Blackwell, 1992, 1996, 2002 (and 2011 with Anne Lombard) and Pontiac's War: Its Causes, Course and Consequences (Routledge, 2007). He is now an independent writer and scholar.
Main Description
The War of American Independence is rightly seen as one of the most important conflicts of the eighteenth century, with continuing consequences for the world today.
Main Description
Wars rarely turn out as expected. This book shows how Britain entered a conflict that it believed could not be lost. The American Patriots were similarly optimistic about their martial prospects. Although they eventually secured independence, it was only with the assistance of France and indirectly Spain, who diverted British resources from the conflict in America, allowing France eventually to deliver a knockout blow at Yorktown. This extensive yet accessible exploration into the War of American Independence provides aclear analysis of why this complex conflict occurred and why it ended as it did, revealing the fragile nature of the American Patriot cause. An essential guide for any history student, including those specializing in war/peace studies and the study of international relations, as well the general reader with an interest in the study of war.
Main Description
Written in accessible and engaging prose, The American Revolutionary War is a concise but comprehensive exploration into a war which affected both sides of the Atlantic, and contains all the useful features expected from a book in the Wars in Perspective series. Wars rarely turn out as expected. This book shows how Britain entered a conflict that it believed could not be lost. The American Patriots were similarly optimistic about their martial prospects. Although they eventually secured independence, it was only with the assistance of France and indirectly Spain, who diverted British resources from the conflict in America, allowing France eventually to deliver a knockout blow at Yorktown. Ironically it is America and her NATO allies that are currently involved in neo- colonial military ventures. This extensive yet accessible exploration into the War of American Independence provides aclear analysis of why this complex conflict occurred and why it ended as it did, revealing the fragile nature of the American Patriot cause. An essential guide for any history student, including those specializing in war/peace studies and the study of international relations, as well the general reader with an interest in the study of war.
Back Cover Copy
‘This is an authoritative and up-to-date assessment of the twists and turns of war and diplomacy through which thirteen former British colonies gained their independence. The complex story is narrated with exemplary clarity and the measured judgements will command wide respect. The extended treatment given to the war on the frontiers, whose outcome was to be of the utmost importance to the native peoples of America, is a most welcome feature.' Peter Marshall, Professor Emeritus of History, King's College London ‘This fresh synthesis offers a clear narrative and shrewd assessment of a seemingly interminable struggle between very different British and American forces, both hobbled by inadequate resources, lame strategies, and flawed leadership. Middleton convincingly argues that this exhausting contest was finally ended only by a dramatic, if widely under-appreciated, French naval intervention at Yorktown.' Ian K. Steele, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Western Ontario ‘Middleton''s account of the American Revolution not only successfully places the rebellion in a broad Atlantic context, but also reminds us that what government leaders at the time called military strategy was largely the product of ignorance and incompetence.' T. H. Breen, Professor of American History, Northwestern University The War of American Independence is rightly seen as one of the most important conflicts of the eighteenth century, with continuing consequences for the world today. Initially Britain viewed the struggle as no more than the suppression of a minor revolt instigated by a few unscrupulous men, being convinced that most colonists remained loyal to their empire and monarch. But wars rarely turn out as expected. While Britain viewed the conflict as one that could not be lost, the white majority in America similarly believed in the justice of their cause and also felt that they would prevail. In consequence, the British found themselves enmeshed in a conflict which they did not understand and to which they had few answers. The entry of France, and then Spain, into the war further diminished Britain's chances, diverting their resources to the defence of the Channel, Gibraltar, Minorca, the West Indies, and trade with the rest of the world. Although George III and his ministers stubbornly held on to the belief that the American Patriots and their allies would eventually tire of the struggle, the reality was that Britaindid not have the resources to fight a war on two continents. After years of indecisive sparring, the knockout blow was eventually delivered by France at Yorktown in the autumn in 1781, allowing the formation of the most significant new nation in the modern world. In his fascinating new book, Richard Middleton provides a perceptive, comprehensive and engaging account of this complex conflict. Taking a broader view, he uncovers the fragile nature of the American Patriot cause and investigates the crucial importance of France and Spain to the achievement of the War of American Independence. Ideal for students of American history, war/peace studies, international relations and eighteenth century politics, this impressive study will provide knowledge and insight to anyone with a general interest in the strategic direction, conduct and outcomes of the American War of Independence. Richard Middleton was for many years Lecturer and Reader in American History at Queen's University, Belfast. Among his various publications are The Bells of Victory: The Pitt-Newcastle Ministry and the Conduct of the Seven Years' War, 1757-1762 (Cambridge University Press, 1985 and 2002), Colonial America: A History to 1763 (Blackwell, 1992, 1996, 2002 (and 2011 with Anne Lombard) and Pontiac's War: Its Causes, Course and Consequences (Routledge, 2007). He is now an independent writer and scholar.
Table of Contents
List of mapsp. vi
Abbreviationsp. vii
Prefacep. viii
Mapsp. x
Britain and America come to blows, 1763-75p. 1
The fighting begins, 1775p. 15
Britain reasserts her authority, 1776p. 41
The unpredictable fortunes of war, 1777p. 69
France comes to America's help, 1778p. 103
Spain enters the conflict, 1779p. 140
Changing strategies, 1780p. 169
The North American frontier, 1775-82p. 211
No daylight at the tunnel's end, 1781p. 237
Resolution at Yorktown, 1781p. 270
End game, 1782p. 298
Conclusions and consequencesp. 321
Appendix: Washington on the art of commandp. 327
Bibliographyp. 328
Indexp. 338
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem