Catalogue

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The Shakespearean stage space /
Mariko Ichikawa.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xiii, 221 p.
ISBN
9781107020351
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
9781107020351
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. Playhouses, play texts and the theatrical language; 2. 'Maluolio within'; 3. 'Music within' and 'Music above'; 4. Were the doors open or closed?; 5. 'Enter Brutus in his Orchard'; 6. What to do with onstage corpses?; Conclusion: the Shakespearean stage space and stage directions.
abstract
"How did Renaissance theatre create its powerful effects with so few resources? In The Shakespearean Stage Space, Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the artistry of the Renaissance stage. Dealing with problematic scenes and stage directions, Ichikawa closely examines the playing conditions in early modern playhouses to reveal the ways in which the structure of the stage was used to ensure the audibility of offstage sounds, to control the visibility of characters, to convey fictional locales, to create specific moods and atmospheres and to maintain a frequently shifting balance between fictional and theatrical realities. She argues that basic theatrical terms were used in a much broader and more flexible way than we usually assume and demonstrates that, rather than imposing limitations, the bare stage of the Shakespearean theatre offered dramatists and actors a variety of imaginative possibilities"--
"The Shakespearean Stage Space How did Renaissance theatre create its powerful effects with so few resources? In The Shakespearean Stage Space, Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the artistry of the Renaissance stage. Dealing with problematic scenes and stage directions, Ichikawa closely examines the playing conditions in early modern playhouses to reveal the ways in which the structure of the stage was used to ensure the audibility of offstage sounds, to control the visibility of characters, to convey fictional locales, to create specific moods and atmospheres and to maintain a frequently shifting balance between fictional and theatrical realities"--
catalogue key
8781331
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 204-216) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'To say that the book reaches no firm conclusions is not to disparage it: rather this uncertainty is a measure of the integrity of Ichikawa's exploration of the slippery world of early modern drama.' Times Literary Supplement
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the theatrical artistry of the Renaissance stage. She offers scholars, students and actors a new way to analyse and interpret early modern plays.
Description for Bookstore
In The Shakespearean Stage Space, Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the theatrical artistry of the Renaissance stage. It will offer scholars, students and actors a new way to analyse and interpret early modern plays.
Main Description
How did Renaissance theatre create its powerful effects with so few resources? In The Shakespearean Stage Space, Mariko Ichikawa explores the original staging of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries to build a new picture of the artistry of the Renaissance stage. Dealing with problematic scenes and stage directions, Ichikawa closely examines the playing conditions in early modern playhouses to reveal the ways in which the structure of the stage was used to ensure the audibility of offstage sounds, to control the visibility of characters, to convey fictional locales, to create specific moods and atmospheres and to maintain a frequently shifting balance between fictional and theatrical realities. She argues that basic theatrical terms were used in a much broader and more flexible way than we usually assume and demonstrates that, rather than imposing limitations, the bare stage of the Shakespearean theatre offered dramatists and actors a variety of imaginative possibilities.
Table of Contents
Playhouses, play texts and the theatrical language
'Maluolio within'
'Music within' and 'Music above'
Were the doors open or closed?
'Enter Brutus in his Orchard'
What to do with onstage corpses?
Conclusion: the Shakespearean stage space and stage directions
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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