Catalogue


Rome re-imagined : twelfth-century Jews, Christians and Muslims encounter the Eternal City /
[edited by] Louis I. Hamilton and Stefano Riccioni.
imprint
Leiden : Brill, 2011.
description
159, v p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9789004225282 (pbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden : Brill, 2011.
isbn
9789004225282 (pbk. : acid-free paper)
contents note
Introduction: Rome Re-imagined / Herbert L. Kessler -- The Rituals of Renaissance : Liturgy and Mythic History in The Marvels of Rome / Louis I. Hamilton -- Rewriting Antiquity, Renewing Rome : The Identity of the Eternal City through Visual Art, Monumental Inscriptions and the Mirabilia / Stefano Riccioni -- Walking in the Shadows of the Past : The Jewish Experience of Rome in the Twelfth Century / Marie Therese Champagne and Ra'anan S. Boustan -- Viewing Rome from the Roman Empires / Emily Albu -- An Assessment of the Political Symbolism of the City of Rome in the Writings of John of Salisbury / Irene A. O'Daly -- Decoding the Labyrinth : Rome in Arabic and Persian Medieval Literature / Mario Casari -- Conclusion: An Imagined City / Louis I. Hamilton and Stefano Riccioni.
general note
"Special offprint of Medieval encounters volume 17/4-5 (2011)"--Cover.
"This special issue of Medieval encounters is the result of a conference held at Drew University in the spring of 2008 and sponsored by Drew University and the Drew University Center on Religion, Culture and Conflict (CRCC)"--Pages 158-159.
Two sets of page numbers given; one bracketed, one not. The bracketed set relates to the page numbering of this volume.
catalogue key
8780668
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Louis Hamilton, Ph.D. (2000) in History, Fordham University; LMS (2007), Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto; is Associate Professor, Drew University, and the author of A Sacred City: Consecrating Churches and Reforming Society in Eleventh-Century Italy (Manchester, 2010). Stefano Riccioni, Ph.D. (2004) in Art History, University of Rome "La Sapienza", LMS (2009), PIMS of Toronto, is Researcher at Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. He has published a book on the mosaic of S. Clemente in Rome (Spoleto 2006).
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, December 2012
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Summaries
Description for Reader
All those interested in Medieval history, Rome, travel history, Church history, history of liturgy, history of jewish traditions, history of muslims, medieval art history, pre-modern Mediterranean, medieval epigraphists, medieval philologists.
Long Description
For nearly a century, the concept of a twelfth-century renaissance has been integral to our understanding of the medieval Latin West. At the heart of any notion of renaissance is a Rome of the mind's eye. This collection places Rome into the larger context of multilingual imaginations to reveal that Rome was both an object of fascination and contestation across the Mediterranean world. In Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Persian, in art, inscriptions, geographies, ritual practice, and itineraries, Rome was both held up as ideal and challenged as an authoritative center. These constructions of Rome could be deployed for renewal and reform, or to enhance or challenge papal or imperial authority because of the imaginative force of the ancient city.Contributors are Herbert L. Kessler, Louis I. Hamilton, Stefano Riccioni, Marie-Thérèse Champagne, Ra'anan S. Boustan, Emily Albu, Irene A. O'Daly, and Mario Casari
Table of Contents
Note from the Publisherp. 1
Introduction: Rome Re-imaginedp. 3
Articles
The Rituals of Renaissance: Liturgy and Mythic History in The Marvels of Romep. 5
Rewriting Antiquity, Renewing Rome. The Identity of the Eternal City through Visual Art, Monumental Inscriptions and the Mirabiliap. 27
Walking in the Shadows of the Past: The Jewish Experience of Rome in the Twelfth Centuryp. 52
Viewing Rome from the Roman Empiresp. 83
An Assessment of the Political Symbolism of the City of Rome in the Writings of John of Salisburyp. 100
Decoding the Labyrinth: Rome in Arabic and Persian Medieval Literaturep. 122
Conclusion: An Imagined Cityp. 154
Indexp. i
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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