Catalogue


Working together to reduce harmful drinking [electronic resource] /
edited by Marcus Grant and Mark Leverton.
imprint
New York, NY : Brunner-Routledge, 2010.
description
ix, 210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780415800877 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Brunner-Routledge, 2010.
isbn
9780415800877 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8778374
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Marcus Grant is President of the International Center for Alcohol Policies (ICAP). He has worked in the alcohol field for over thirty years, first as Director of a U.K.-based nongovernmental organization, the Alcohol Education Center, which provided national coordination of post-qualification training on alcohol problems for health and social service staff, and then for the World Health Organization (WHO), where he was responsible for global activities on the prevention of alcohol and drug abuse. He resigned from WHO in 1994 to set up ICAP. Mark Leverton is Director of Alcohol Policy and Industry Issues at Diageo, the world's leading beer, wine, and spirits company. A member of the ICAP Board of Directors since 1997 and Chairman of the Board from 2004 to 2006, he has held a number of senior management positions in Diageo in London, Brussels, and Asia. He has also held a number of industry positions, including Chairman of the Scotch Whisky Association International Affairs Committee and Chairman of the Alcohol and Society Standing Committee of the Confederation Europenne des Producteurs de Spiritueux (CEPS); he was a longstanding member of the Scotch Whisky Association Council. Mr. Leverton has represented Diageo in formal industry consultations with WHO on how to reduce harmful drinking.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This book is intended to contribute to the World Health Organization's (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. It explores areas where alcohol producers' technical competence can and does make a positive contribution to reducing harmful drinking and where industry input has been welcomed by WHO. The book describes each of these areas: producing beer, wine, and spirits; addressing availability of noncommercial beverages; pricing, marketing, and selling beverage alcohol; encouraging responsible choices; and working with others. The final chapter sets out views of how alcohol producers can contribute to reducing harmful drinking in countries where they are present. The messages recurring throughout the book are that reasonable regulation provides the context for good alcohol policy, excessive regulation often leads to unintended negative consequences, leading producers have a proud record of making positive contributions to implementing effective alcohol policies'”but there are opportunities to do much more.
Main Description
This book is intended to contribute to the World Health Organization "s (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. It explores areas where alcohol producers " technical competence can and does make a positive contribution to reducing harmful drinking and where industry input has been welcomed by WHO. The book describes each of these areas: producing beer, wine, and spirits; addressing availability of noncommercial beverages; pricing, marketing, and selling beverage alcohol; encouraging responsible choices; and working with others. The final chapter sets out views of how alcohol producers can contribute to reducing harmful drinking in countries where they are present. The messages recurring throughout the book are that reasonable regulation provides the context for good alcohol policy, excessive regulation often leads to unintended negative consequences, leading producers have a proud record of making positive contributions to implementing effective alcohol policies -but there are opportunities to do much more.
Main Description
This book is intended to contribute to the World Health Organization's (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. It explores areas where alcohol producers' technical competence can and does make a positive contribution to reducing harmful drinking and where industry input has been welcomed by WHO. The book describes each of these areas: producing beer, wine, and spirits; addressing availability of noncommercial beverages; pricing, marketing, and selling beverage alcohol; encouraging responsible choices; and working with others. The final chapter sets out views of how alcohol producers can contribute to reducing harmful drinking in countries where they are present. The messages recurring throughout the book are that reasonable regulation provides the context for good alcohol policy, excessive regulation often leads to unintended negative consequences, leading producers have a proud record of making positive contributions to implementing effective alcohol policies -but there are opportunities to do much more.
Back Cover Copy
This book is intended to contribute to the World Health Organization's (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol and lays out for the international community a coherent view of what it is that beverage alcohol producers can do. While governments, health professionals, and civil society must occupy center stage in developing and implementing balanced alcohol policies, alcohol producers also have a role to play. This book demonstrates just how positive that role can be by focusing on key areas of reducing harmful drinking where the producers show particular competence and technical strength and where industry input has been welcomed by WHO: responsible production of beer, wine, and spirits; addressing availability of noncommercial beverages; pricing, marketing, and selling beverage alcohol; encouraging responsible choices; and working with other sectors.The messages recurring throughout the book are that reasonable regulation provides the context for good alcohol policy, excessive regulation often leads to unanticipated negative consequences, leading producers have a proud record of making positive contributions to implementing effective alcohol policies'”but there are opportunities to do much more. The book concludes with a menu of options for specific actions that leading producers are willing and able to take, where permitted and appropriate, in countries around the world. Some are extensions of actions they are already taking; others are new proposals, offered in the spirit of breaking down traditional divisions between the private and public sectors. All are based on the experience, expertise, and resources of the industry and stress the willingness of alcohol producers to play a positive role in both helping to develop effective strategies to reduce harmful drinking and working with others on their implementation.
Back Cover Copy
This book is intended to contribute to the World Health Organization's (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. It explores areas where alcohol producers' technical competence can and does make a positive contribution to reducing harmful drinking and where industry input has been welcomed by WHO. The book describes each of these areas: producing beer, wine, and spirits; addressing availability of noncommercial beverages; pricing, marketing, and selling beverage alcohol; encouraging responsible choices; and working with others. The final chapter sets outs views of how alcohol producers can contribute to reducing harmful drinking in countries where they are present. The messages recurring throughout the book are that reasonable regulation provides the context for good alcohol policy, excessive regulation often leads to unintended negative consequences, leading producers have a proud record of making positive contributions to implementing effective alcohol policies'”but there are opportunities to do much more.
Table of Contents
About the Editorsp. vii
Contributorsp. ix
Disclaimerp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Producing Beer, Wine, and Spiritsp. 17
Understanding Alcohol Availability: Noncommercial Beveragesp. 39
Marketing Beverage Alcoholp. 63
Pricing Beverage Alcoholp. 91
Selling and Serving Beverage Alcoholp. 115
Making Responsible Choicesp. 143
Working Togetherp. 171
Implementing the WHO Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Use of Alcohol: The Producers' Contributionsp. 197
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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