Catalogue

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Social understanding and social lives [electronic resource] : from toddlerhood through to the transition to school /
Claire Hughes.
imprint
Hove, East Sussex ; New York : Psychology Press, 2011.
description
xii, 238 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1841697354 (hbk.), 9781841697352 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Hove, East Sussex ; New York : Psychology Press, 2011.
isbn
1841697354 (hbk.)
9781841697352 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Milestones in social understanding, from infancy to school age -- Executive functions and children's understanding of mind -- Language and theory of mind: cognitive perspectives -- Language and theory of mind: social perspectives -- Parenting and children's social understanding -- Social understanding: siblings and friends -- Social understanding and antisocial behaviour -- Social understanding and positive social behaviours -- Social understanding and school life -- Emerging themes.
catalogue key
8775807
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-224) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Claire Hughes is a fellow of Newnham College, and Reader in Developmental Psychology at the Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, UK
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[An] engaging, lucid and authoritative book. What makes this book such an important reading - not just for academics and students working in this area but also for professionals in education and health- is not simply Hughes's skilful ability to weave together the key themes emerging from a large, and rapidly growing, literature with the delightfully accessible findings of her own very substantial research programme. More than that, Hughes accomplishes the crucial task of setting a clear agenda for future work that builds on all of this progress. ... Hughes puts us all in a good position to maximize the strength and applied value of work on children's social-cognitive development." - Robin Banerjee, University of Sussex, UK, in Infant and Child Development "Hughes's book focusesprimarily on findings from theory-of-mind research, teaching readers about infants' and toddlers' ability to understand their own and others' false beliefs, intentions, emotions, and behaviors. Readers learn a perspective on how toddlers see the world, negotiate the microcontexts they face daily, and prepare to enter the relatively impersonal world of schooling." - Theresa A. Thorkildsen, in PsycCRITIQUES "This book is exceptionally clear and thorough, on a topic of much current interest to psychologists. The author has brought together the findings from her project with skill and clarity and considers the current field in a sensible and informed way. I read it with real enthusiasm and interest" - Judy Dunn, Professor of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London UK "This book is a unique tour de force. It skilfully integrates aspects of children's own cognitive abilities with features of their social environment to explain the individual differences found in children's theory of mind and the consequences of these differences for their social lives at home and school. It will be an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in developmental psychology, child health, and education."- Janet Wilde Astington, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
"[An] engaging, lucid and authoritative book. What makes this book such an important reading not just for academics and students working in this area but also for professionals in education and health is not simply Hughes's skilful ability to weave together the key themes emerging from a large, and rapidly growing, literature with the delightfully accessible findings of her own very substantial research programme. More than that, Hughes accomplishes the crucial task of setting a clear agenda for future work that builds on all of this progress. ... Hughes puts us all in a good position to maximize the strength and applied value of work on children's social-cognitive development." - Robin Banerjee, University of Sussex, UK, in Infant and Child Development "Hughes's book focuses primarily on findings from theory-of-mind research, teaching readers about infants' and toddlers' ability to understand their own and others' false beliefs, intentions, emotions, and behaviors. Readers learn a perspective on how toddlers see the world, negotiate the microcontexts they face daily, and prepare to enter the relatively impersonal world of schooling." - Theresa A. Thorkildsen, in PsycCRITIQUES "This book is exceptionally clear and thorough, on a topic of much current interest to psychologists. The author has brought together the findings from her project with skill and clarity and considers the current field in a sensible and informed way. I read it with real enthusiasm and interest" - Judy Dunn, Professor of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London UK "This book is a unique tour de force. It skilfully integrates aspects of children's own cognitive abilities with features of their social environment to explain the individual differences found in children's theory of mind and the consequences of these differences for their social lives at home and school. It will be an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in developmental psychology, child health, and education." - Janet Wilde Astington, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
"Hughes's book focuses primarily on findings from theory-of-mind research, teaching readers about infants' and toddlers' ability to understand their own and others' false beliefs, intentions, emotions, and behaviors. Readers learn a perspective on how toddlers see the world, negotiate the microcontexts they face daily, and prepare to enter the relatively impersonal world of schooling." -Theresa A. Thorkildsen, in PsycCRITIQUES "This book is exceptionally clear and thorough, on a topic of much current interest to psychologists. The author has brought together the findings from her project with skill and clarity and considers the current field in a sensible and informed way. I read it with real enthusiasm and interest" - Judy Dunn, Professor of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London UK "This book is a uniquetour de force. It skilfully integrates aspects of children's own cognitive abilities with features of their social environment to explain the individual differences found in children's theory of mind and the consequences of these differences for their social lives at home and school. It will be an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in developmental psychology, child health, and education."Janet Wilde Astington, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
"This book is exceptionally clear and thorough, on a topic of much current interest to psychologists. The author has brought together the findings from her project with skill and clarity and considers the current field in a sensible and informed way. I read it with real enthusiasm and interest" - Judy Dunn, Professor of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London UK "This book is a uniquetour de force. It skilfully integrates aspects of children "s own cognitive abilities with features of their social environment to explain the individual differences found in children "s theory of mind and the consequences of these differences for their social lives at home and school. It will be an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in developmental psychology, child health, and education." “Janet Wilde Astington, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
"This book is exceptionally clear and thorough, on a topic of much current interest to psychologists. The author has brought together the findings from her project with skill and clarity and considers the current field in a sensible and informed way. I read it with real enthusiasm and interest" - Judy Dunn, Professor of Developmental Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London UK" This book is a unique tour de force . It skillfully integrates aspects of children's own cognitive abilities with features of their social environment to explain the individual differences found in children's theory of mind and the consequences of these differences for their social lives at home and school. It will be an invaluable resource for researchers and professionals in developmental psychology, child health, and education." ' Janet Wilde Astington, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Canada
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using information gathered from classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates links between individual differences in early social understanding and in the quality of children's interactions with friends, in their ability to resolve conflict, and in diverse aspects of school adjustment.
Main Description
Over the past thirty years, researchers have documented a remarkable growth in children "s social understanding between toddlerhood and the early school years. However, it is still unclear why some children "s awareness of others' thoughts and feelings lags so far behind that of their peers. Based on research that spans an extended developmental period, this book examines this question from both social and cognitive perspectives, and investigates the real-life significance of individual differences in theory of mind. After tracing the key age-related changes in the development of theory of mind, this book examines individual differences in relation to both children "s cognitive abilities and their and social experiences. Why might language or executive functions matter for children "s social understanding? And how do children "s linguistic environments and relationships with parents and siblings contribute to their ability to reflect on people "s thoughts and feelings? The second half of the book reviews the evidence for predictive links between early social understanding and later social behaviour. Using information gathered from classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates links between individual differences in early social understanding and in the quality of children "s interactions with friends, in their ability to resolve conflict, and in diverse aspects of school adjustment. Drawing on rich observational data gathered in this extended longitudinal study, as well as skills acquired during her early experimental studies of children with autism and a six year collaboration with Professor Judy Dunn, the author integrates both cognitive and social accounts of theory of mind. The book is ideal reading for researchers actively working in the field, graduate and undergraduate students specializing in developmental psychology, educational and health professionals and parents interested in learning about children "s early social development.
Main Description
Over the past thirty years, researchers have documented a remarkable growth in children's social understanding between toddlerhood and the early school years. However, it is still unclear why some children's awareness of others' thoughts and feelings lags so far behind that of their peers. Based on research that spans an extended developmental period, this book examines this question from both social and cognitive perspectives, and investigates the real-life significance of individual differences in theory of mind. After tracing the key age-related changes in the development of theory of mind, this book examines individual differences in relation to children's cognitive abilities and their social experiences. Why might language or executive function matter for children's social understanding? And how do children's linguistic environments and relationships with parents and siblings contribute to their ability to reflect on people's thoughts and feelings? The book also reviews the evidence for predictive links between early social understanding and later social behaviour. Using information gathered from classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates links between individual differences in early social understanding and in the quality of children's interactions with friends, in their ability to resolve conflict, and in diverse aspects of school adjustment. Drawing on rich observational data gathered in this extended longitudinal study, as well as skills acquired during her early experimental studies of children with autism and a six year collaboration with Professor Judy Dunn, the author integrates both cognitive and social accounts of theory of mind. The book is ideal reading for researchers actively working in the field, graduate and undergraduate students specializing in developmental psychology, educational and health professionals, and parents interested in learning about children's early social developmen
Main Description
Over the past thirty years, researchers have documented a remarkable growth in children's social understanding between toddlerhood and the early school years. However, it is still unclear why some children's awareness of others' thoughts and feelings lags so far behind that of their peers. Based on research that spans an extended developmental period, this book examines this question from both social and cognitive perspectives, and investigates the real-life significance of individual differences in theory of mind. After tracing the key age-related changes in the development of theory of mind, this book examines individual differences in relation to children's cognitive abilities and their social experiences. Why might language or executive function matter for children's social understanding? And how do children's linguistic environments and relationships with parents and siblings contribute to their ability to reflect on people's thoughts and feelings? The book also reviews the evidence for predictive links between early social understanding and later social behaviour. Using information gathered from classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates links between individual differences in early social understanding and in the quality of children's interactions with friends, in their ability to resolve conflict, and in diverse aspects of school adjustment. Drawing on rich observational data gathered in this extended longitudinal study, as well as skills acquired during her early experimental studies of children with autism and a six year collaboration with Professor Judy Dunn, the author integrates both cognitive and social accounts of theory of mind. The book is ideal reading for researchers actively working in the field, graduate and undergraduate students specializing in developmental psychology, educational and health professionals, and parents interested in learning about children's early social development.
Main Description
Over the past thirty years, researchers have documented a remarkable growth in children's social understanding between toddlerhood and the early school years. However, it is still unclear why some children's awareness of others' thoughts and feelings lags so far behind that of their peers. Based on research that spans an extended developmental period, this book examines this question from both social and cognitive perspectives, and investigates the real-life significance of individual differences in theory of mind.After tracing the key age-related changes in the development of theory of mind, this book focuses on variation in both children's cognitive and family characteristics. In particular it investigates the differences in children's ability to self-regulate, their general language skills and the quantity and quality of family conversations to explain why some children show a much more advanced social understanding than others.In the second half of the book, the book reviews the evidence for predictive links between early social understanding and later social behavior. Using information gathered from different social partners including classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates the quality of children's interactions with friends, their ability to resolve conflict without resorting to antisocial or disruptive behavior, and diverse aspects of school adjustment.Drawing on the rich observational data gathered in her extended longitudinal study, as well as skills acquired during a six year collaboration with Professor Judy Dunn, the author successfully integrates both cognitive and social accounts of theory of mind. The book is ideal reading for researchers actively working in the field, educational and health professionals interested in children's early development, as well as graduate students and undergraduates in developmental psychology.
Main Description
Shortlisted for the British Psychological Society Book Award 2013! Over the past thirty years, researchers have documented a remarkable growth in children's social understanding between toddlerhood and the early school years. However, it is still unclear why some children's awareness of others' thoughts and feelings lags so far behind that of their peers. Based on research that spans an extended developmental period, this book examines this question from both social and cognitive perspectives, and investigates the real-life significance of individual differences in theory of mind. After tracing the key age-related changes in the development of theory of mind, this book examines individual differences in relation tochildren's cognitive abilities and their social experiences. Why might language or executive function matter for children's social understanding? And how do children's linguistic environments and relationships with parents and siblings contribute to their ability to reflect on people's thoughts and feelings? Thebook also reviews the evidence for predictive links between early social understanding and later social behaviour. Using information gathered from classmates, teachers and the children themselves, the author investigates links between individual differences in early social understanding and in the quality of children's interactions with friends, in their ability to resolve conflict, and in diverse aspects of school adjustment. Drawing on rich observational data gathered in this extended longitudinal study, as well as skills acquired during her early experimental studies of children with autism and a six year collaboration with Professor Judy Dunn, the author integrates both cognitive and social accounts of theory of mind. The book is ideal reading for researchers actively working in the field, graduate and undergraduate students specializing in developmental psychology, educational and health professionals, and parents interested in learning about children's early social development.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Brief history of three decades of researchp. 1
Why the title "Social Understanding and Social Lives"?p. 2
How this book is organizedp. 3
A short account of the Toddlers Up studyp. 5
Cognitive perspectives on social understandingp. 13
Milestones in social understanding - from infancy to school agep. 15
Understanding of attention and intention in infancyp. 17
Toddlers understand world-inconsistent goalsp. 19
Preschoolers show a representational understanding of mental statesp. 24
School-aged children show a recursive and interpretative understanding of mental statesp. 27
Chapter summaryp. 30
Executive functions and children's understanding of mindp. 33
Why might executive functions matter for children's understanding of mind?p. 35
Does early executive function predict later social understanding (or vice versa)?p. 39
Does the link between theory of mind and executive functions reflect common effects of a third factor?p. 40
Is the link between executive functions and social understanding general or specific?p. 42
Links between executive functions and theory of mind in atypical groupsp. 44
Further findings from the Toddlers Up studyp. 45
Cross-cultural perspectives on links between executive functions and social understandingp. 47
Chapter summaryp. 49
Language and theory of mind: Cognitive perspectivesp. 51
Making sense of links between individual differences in language and theory of mindp. 52
Language and theory of mind in clinical populationsp. 57
Language, theory of mind and imaging researchp. 61
Predictive relations between language and false-belief understanding in the Toddlers Up study: A latent variable approachp. 63
Chapter summaryp. 64
Social influences on children's understanding of mindp. 67
Language and theory of mind: Social perspectivesp. 69
Three distinct social perspectives on why language matters for social understandingp. 70
Relationship perspective on links between discourse and social understandingp. 75
Temporally dynamic perspective on mother-child talk and social understandingp. 85
Chapter summaryp. 87
Parenting and children's social understandingp. 89
From history to current practicep. 89
Attachment and social understandingp. 93
Caregiver depression, family relationships and social understandingp. 96
Culture, parenting and children's social understandingp. 99
Chapter summaryp. 103
Social understanding: Siblings and friendsp. 105
Siblings, friends, pretend play and mindreading skillsp. 106
Indirect effects of siblings on children's mindreading skillsp. 111
Developmental change in sibling relationships and links with social understandingp. 115
Are sibling influences on social understanding universal?p. 117
Chapter summaryp. 121
Social understanding and social outcomesp. 123
Social understanding and antisocial behaviourp. 125
Theory-of-mind skills are socially neutralp. 125
Deviance matters as much as delayp. 128
Developmental perspectivep. 130
Links between social understanding and bullying are heterogeneousp. 134
Bringing deontics into the picturep. 137
Chapter summaryp. 140
Social understanding and positive social behavioursp. 141
Are milestones in children's psychological understanding and social competence developmentally synchronous?p. 141
Is the link between social understanding and social competence stronger for some children than for others?p. 145
Discourse and children's understanding of mindp. 148
Chapter summaryp. 153
Social understanding and school lifep. 155
Social understanding and views from peers and teachersp. 156
Social understanding and children's own views of school lifep. 160
Social understanding and children's experiences with peers and teachersp. 163
Chapter summaryp. 165
Conclusionp. 167
Emerging themesp. 169
Development as an emerging themep. 169
Observations of children's interactions with others are a valuable research toolp. 172
Moderators and mediatorsp. 175
New directions for researchp. 180
Conclusionsp. 183
Appendicesp. 185
Participant characteristics for the Toddlers Up studyp. 185
Observationsp. 186
Summary of tasks used in the Toddlers Up studyp. 191
Referencesp. 193
Author indexp. 225
Subject indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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