Catalogue


Searching for security in a new Europe [electronic resource] : the diplomatic career of Sir George Russell Clerk /
Gerald J. Protheroe.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
description
vii, 242 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0714655112, 9780714655116
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
isbn
0714655112
9780714655116
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8775340
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [204]-235) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gerald J. Protheroe is Adjunct Associate Professor of Social Sciences at New York University and the Head of the History Department at The Browning School in New York.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Drawing on an array of archival material, this study sheds light on Sir George Russell Clerk, an important, yet forgotten figure in British and European diplomatic history. During the First World War, Clerk was a senior Foreign Office official strongly sympathetic to the cause of the 'oppressed nationalities' of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. This biographical study focuses on the most significant part of Clerk "s career, his role as a nation-builder in post-war Europe until his eventual downfall at the hands of Antony Eden, and retirement in 1937. This is an excellent account of the thoughts and deeds of a remarkable man in British History.
Back Cover Copy
Drawing on an array of archival material, this study sheds light on Sir George Russell Clerk, an important, yet forgotten figure in British and European diplomatic history. During the First World War, Clerk was a senior Foreign Office official strongly sympathetic to the cause of the 'oppressed nationalities' of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. This biographical study focuses on the most significant part of Clerk's career, his role as a nation-builder in post-war Europe until his eventual downfall at the hands of Antony Eden, and retirement in 1937. This is an excellent account of the thoughts and deeds of a remarkable man in British History.
Long Description
At the end of the First World War the collapse of autocratic states and empires in Central and Eastern Europe offered the Allied Powers an unprecedented opportunity to shape the political and economic construction of the new states. In 1919 Sir George Russell Clerk became private secretary to the acting British Foreign Secretary Lord Curzon, and during the next eighteen years, Clerk became an important diplomatic figure in the building of a new Europe. He was involved in the construction of a Hungarian government with whom the Allies could co-operate, and during posting in Czechoslovakia and Turkey strengthened relations between Britain and these new states. This biographical study of Sir George Russell Clerk focuses on the most significant part of his career, his role as a nation builder in postwar Europe until his eventual downfall at the hands of Anthony Eden, and retirement in 1937. Drawing on extensive research this study attempts to shed new light on a key figure in British and European diplomacy.
Main Description
At the end of the First World War the collapse of autocratic states and empires in Central and Eastern Europe offered the Allied Powers an unprecedented opportunity to shape the political and economic construction of the new states. In 1919 Sir George Russell Clerk became private secretary to the acting British Foreign Secretary Lord Curzon, and during the next eighteen years, Clerk became an important diplomatic figure in the building of a new Europe. He was involved in the construction of a Hungarian government with whom the Allies could co-operate, and during posting in Czechoslovakia and Turkey strengthened relations between Britain and these new states. This biographical study of Sir George Russell Clerk focuses on the most significant part of his career, his role as a nation builder in postwar Europe until his eventual downfall at the hands of Anthony Eden, and retirement in 1937. Drawing on extensive research this study attempts to shed new light on a key figure in British and Europeandiplomacy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Abbreviationsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Empire, world war and a New Europe 1898-1919p. 3
Nation-building in the New Europe: Hungary 1919p. 43
Nation-building in the New Europe: Czechoslovakia 1920-6p. 74
Repairing relationships: the New Turkey 1926-33p. 120
'Ripe for a mighty enterprise': France 1934-5p. 153
The crisis of security: France 1935-7p. 171
Conclusionp. 201
Notesp. 204
Bibliographyp. 226
Indexp. 236
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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