Catalogue

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Religion, community, and development [electronic resource] : changing contours of politics and policy in India /
editors, Gurpreet Mahajan, Surinder S. Jodhka.
imprint
New Delhi ; Abingdon : Routledge, 2010.
description
xii, 336 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780415585668
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Delhi ; Abingdon : Routledge, 2010.
isbn
9780415585668
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
Papers presented at a seminar organized at Jawaharlal Nehru University on Mar., 2007.
catalogue key
8774499
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
Papers presented at a seminar organized at Jawaharlal Nehru University on Mar., 2007.
Main Description
By making religious community a relevant category for discussing development deficit, the Sachar Committee Report (2007) initiated a new political discourse in India. This book examines its findings and highlights the implications of a new political discourse.
Main Description
By making religious community a relevant category for discussing development deficit, the Sachar Committee Report (that was submitted to the Prime Minister of India in 2007) initiated a new political discourse in India. While the liberal secular framework privileged the individual over the community and was more inclined to use the category of class rather than the identity of religion, the Sachar Committee differentiated citizens on the basis of their religious identity. Its conclusions reinforced the necessity of approaching issues of development through the optic of religious community. This volume focuses on this shift in public policy. The articles in this collection examine the nature and implications of this new approach to the Indian social reality. Taking a close look at the findings of the Sachar Committee Report (SCR) they highlight the challenges posed by inter-community comparisons. At another level the articles supplement the debate initiated by the SCR by constructing a profile of religious communities in India so as to factor in their concerns of development into the present discourse and to nuance and modify the simple indicators to which development is often reduced. As most religious communities are themselves engaged in development-related activities the volume also examines some of these initiatives in order to see what development connotes to the members themselves and what receives attention by the community. Students of social sciences and development studies as well as those dealing with issues of marginalization will find this collection an invaluable resource for understanding contemporary India and for undertaking further theoretical and empirical research.
Main Description
By making religious community a relevant category for discussing development deficit, the Sachar Committee Report (that was submitted to the Prime Minister of India in 2007) initiated a new political discourse in India. While the liberal secular framework privileged the individual over the community and was more inclined to use the category of class rather than the identity of religion, the Sachar Committee differentiated citizens on the basis of their religious identity. Its conclusions reinforced the necessity of approaching issues of development through the optic of religious community.This volume focuses on this shift in public policy. The articles in this collection examine the nature and implications of this new approach to the Indian social reality. Taking a close look at the findings of the Sachar Committee Report (SCR) they highlight the challenges posed by inter-community comparisons. At another level the articles supplement the debate initiated by the SCR by constructing a profile of religious communities in India so as to factor in their concerns of development into the present discourse and to nuance and modify the simple indicators to which development is often reduced. As most religious communities are themselves engaged in development-related activities the volume also examines some of these initiatives in order to see what development connotes to the members themselves and what receives attention by the community.'Students of social sciences and development studies as well as those dealing with issues of marginalization will find this collection an invaluable resource for understanding contemporary India and for undertaking further theoretical and empirical research.

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