Catalogue


Popular protest in late medieval English towns [electronic resource] /
Samuel K. Cohn, Jr. ; with assistance from Douglas Aiton.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xiii, 375 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107027800 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
9781107027800 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"Contrary to received opinion, revolts and popular protests in medieval English towns were as frequent and as sophisticated, if not more so, as those in the countryside. This groundbreaking study refocuses attention on the varied nature of popular movements in towns from Carlisle to Dover and from the London tax revolt of Longbeard in 1196 to Jack Cade's Rebellion in 1450, exploring the leadership, social composition, organisation and motives of popular protest. The book charts patterns of urban revolt in times of strong and weak kingship, contrasting them with the broad sweep of ecological and economic change that inspired revolts on the continent. Samuel Cohn demonstrates that the timing and character of popular revolt in England differed radically from revolts in Italy, France and Flanders. In addition, he analyses repression and waves of hate against Jews, foreigners and heretics, opening new vistas in the comparative history of late medieval Europe"--
catalogue key
8773324
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-08-01:
By using chronicles and patent rolls, Cohn (Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland) analyzes primarily English urban disturbances from William FitzHerbert's uprising in London (1196) to Jack Cade's rebellion (1450). He also compares urban protests in England with those on the Continent. English urban protests usually were conflicts between rival elites and their followers, while conflicts in Europe, especially in Italy, often were either between the haves and have-nots or were struggles to overthrow whoever exercised power over a particular commune. Cohn suggests the strength of the English monarchy helps explain the general difference between urban protests in England and those on the Continent. When the English crown was weak, English urban disturbances could be more radical. An example is the uprising in Bristol (1312-16). As well, both the baronial revolt and the misnamed Peasants' Revolt occurred during periods of monarchical weakness. Attacks on Jews, some occurring during the baronial revolt, were encouraged by those, including the crown, who owed Jews money. Cohn discusses many other topics--e.g., the frequency of unrest in English towns with monastic or clerical overlords--that add to his skillful portrayal of urban unrest in medieval England. Copious notes and full bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Suitable for graduate students, researchers/faculty. C. L. Hamilton formerly, Simon Fraser University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A step forward and bound to stimulate and facilitate further study.' Times Literary Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Contrary to received opinion, revolts and popular protests in medieval English towns were as frequent and as sophisticated, if not more so, as those in the countryside. This groundbreaking study refocuses attention on the varied nature of popular movements in towns from Carlisle to Dover and from the London tax revolt of Longbeard in 1196 to Jack Cade's Rebellion in 1450, exploring the leadership, social composition, organisation and motives of popular rebels. The book charts patterns of urban revolt in times of strong and weak kingship, contrasting them with the broad sweep of ecological and economic change that inspired revolts on the continent. Samuel Cohn demonstrates that the timing and character of popular revolt in England differed radically from revolts in Italy, France and Flanders. In addition, he analyses repression and waves of hate against Jews, foreigners and heretics, opening new vistas in the comparative history of late medieval Europe.
Description for Bookstore
Popular protests in medieval English towns were as frequent and as sophisticated, if not more so, as those in the countryside. This groundbreaking study refocuses attention on the leadership, social composition, organisation and motives of urban popular protest, revealing how its timing and character varied from events on the continent.
Main Description
Contrary to received opinion, revolts and popular protests in medieval English towns were as frequent and as sophisticated, if not more so, as those in the countryside. This groundbreaking study refocuses attention on the varied nature of popular movements in towns from Carlisle to Dover and from the London tax revolt of Longbeard in 1196 to Jack Cade's Rebellion in 1450, exploring the leadership, social composition, organisation and motives of popular protest. The book charts patterns of urban revolt in times of strong and weak kingship, contrasting them with the broad sweep of ecological and economic change that inspired revolts on the continent. Samuel Cohn demonstrates that the timing and character of popular revolt in England differed radically from revolts in Italy, France and Flanders. In addition, he analyses repression and waves of hate against Jews, foreigners and heretics, opening new vistas in the comparative history of late medieval Europe.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Popular protests in medieval English towns were as frequent and as sophisticated, if not more so, as those in the countryside. This study refocuses attention on the leadership, social composition, organization and motives of urban popular protest, revealing how its timing and character varied from events on the continent.
Table of Contents
The Setting
Introduction: questions and sources
Class struggle in English towns: workers and bosses
Varieties of revolt
Crown and Town: Strife with Secular Authority
Revolts against the Crown: crises of kingship from John Lackland to Henry VI
The Black Death and urban protest
Urban revolts against the Crown outside London: the case of Bristol
A wave of insurrection, 1312-1318?
Tax revolts
Revolts: poor against rich
Church and City
Revolts in monastic boroughs
Church struggles in towns other than monastic boroughs
Urban conflict against bishops and universities
Urban risings of hatred: Jews, foreigners, and heretics
Conclusion
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem