Catalogue


New directions in conservation medicine : applied cases of ecological health /
edited by A. Alonso Aguirre, Richard S. Ostfeld, and Peter Daszak.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
description
xxvi, 639 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0199731470 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780199731473 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0199731470 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780199731473 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8755862
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
A. Alonso Aguirre is Executive Director of the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation based at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, and Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental Science and Policy in George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. Richard S. Ostfeld is Senior Scientist and Animal Ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York. Peter Daszak is President of EcoHealth Alliance, New York, New York.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
Aguirre, the progenitor of conservation medicine, Ostfeld (Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies), and Daszak (EcoHealth Alliance) assembled 42 chapters emphasizing "one health," a focus on unifying medicine as applied to humans, wildlife, ecosystems, and ultimately the global environment. They relate this to preserving biodiversity and ecological sustainability. The 140 contributors (including 47 veterinarians and 6 physicians) cover a wide array of applications; they draw examples from each continent, ranging from microorganisms and emerging infections to human-wildlife interactions and disease. The role of bush meat (including fruit bats) in the jump of animal infections to humans is important, and the effects of water pollutants that cause harmful algal blooms and human disease are of particular interest. Conservation biology emphasizes the imperative that humans reverse/mitigate the broad sweep of detrimental impacts of unbridled population growth, unfair land-use practices, and unsustainable resource extraction. The six-part book begins by discussing biodiversity and examining anthropogenic changes (this section is weak on human population growth). Contributors then provide an excellent introduction to emerging infections and zoonoses; a brief section on ecotoxicology follows. The book concludes with case studies and methods/applications (e.g., surveillance, monitoring, modeling). Overall, a valuable contribution to ecology and health on many fronts. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Gochfeld Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title covers topics from emerging diseases and toxicants to the EcoHealth/One Health explosion. It challenges the notion that human health is an isolated concern removed from the bounds of ecology and species interactions.
Main Description
In recent years, species and ecosystems have been threatened by many anthropogenic factors manifested in local and global declines of populations and species. Although we consider conservation medicine an emerging field, the concept is the result of the long evolution of transdisciplinary thinking within the health and ecological sciences and the better understanding of the complexity within these various fields of knowledge. Conservation medicine was born from the cross fertilization of ideas generated by this new transdisciplinary design. It examines the links among changes in climate, habitat quality, and land use; emergence and re-emergence of infectious agents, parasites and environmental contaminants; and maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functions as they sustain the health of plant and animal communities including humans. During the past ten years, new tools and institutional initiatives for assessing and monitoring ecological health concerns have emerged: landscape epidemiology, disease ecological modeling and web-based analytics. New types of integrated ecological health assessment are being deployed; these efforts incorporate environmental indicator studies with specific biomedical diagnostic tools. Other innovations include the development of non-invasive physiological and behavioral monitoring techniques; the adaptation of modern molecular biological and biomedical techniques; the design of population level disease monitoring strategies; the creation of ecosystem-based health and sentinel species surveillance approaches; and the adaptation of health monitoring systems for appropriate developing country situations. New Directions of Conservation Medicine: Applied Cases of Ecological Health addresses these issues with relevant case studies and detailed applied examples. New Directions of Conservation Medicine challenges the notion that human health is an isolated concern removed from the bounds of ecology and species interactions. Human health, animal health, and ecosystem health are moving closer together and at some point, it will be inconceivable that there was ever a clear division.
Main Description
In recent years, species and ecosystems have been threatened by many anthropogenic factors manifested in local and global declines of populations and species. Although we consider conservation medicine an emerging field, the concept is the result of the long evolution of transdisciplinary thinking within the health and ecological sciences and the better understanding of the complexity within these various fields of knowledge. Conservation medicine was born from the cross fertilization ofideas generated by this new transdisciplinary design. It examines the links among changes in climate, habitat quality, and land use; emergence and re-emergence of infectious agents, parasites and environmental contaminants; and maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functions as they sustain the health of plant and animal communities including humans. During the past ten years, new tools and institutional initiatives for assessing and monitoring ecological health concerns have emerged: landscape epidemiology, disease ecological modeling and web-based analytics. New types of integrated ecological health assessment are being deployed; these efforts incorporate environmental indicator studies with specific biomedical diagnostic tools. Other innovations include the development of non-invasive physiological and behavioral monitoring techniques; the adaptation of modern molecular biological and biomedical techniques; the design of population level disease monitoring strategies; thecreation of ecosystem-based health and sentinel species surveillance approaches; and the adaptation of health monitoring systems for appropriate developing country situations. New Directions of Conservation Medicine: Applied Cases of Ecological Health addresses these issues with relevant case studies and detailed applied examples. New Directions of Conservation Medicine challenges the notion that human health is an isolated concern removed from the bounds of ecology and species interactions.Human health, animal health, and ecosystem health are moving closer together and at some point, it will be inconceivable that there was ever a clear division.
Main Description
In recent years, species and ecosystems have been threatened by many anthropogenic factors manifested in local and global declines of populations and species. Although we consider conservation medicine an emerging field, the concept is the result of the long evolution of transdisciplinarythinking within the health and ecological sciences and the better understanding of the complexity within these various fields of knowledge. Conservation medicine was born from the cross fertilization of ideas generated by this new transdisciplinary design. It examines the links among changes inclimate, habitat quality, and land use; emergence and re-emergence of infectious agents, parasites and environmental contaminants; and maintenance of biodiversity and ecosystem functions as they sustain the health of plant and animal communities including humans. During the past ten years, new tools and institutional initiatives for assessing and monitoring ecological health concerns have emerged: landscape epidemiology, disease ecological modeling and web-based analytics. New types of integrated ecological health assessment are being deployed; these effortsincorporate environmental indicator studies with specific biomedical diagnostic tools. Other innovations include the development of non-invasive physiological and behavioral monitoring techniques; the adaptation of modern molecular biological and biomedical techniques; the design of population leveldisease monitoring strategies; the creation of ecosystem-based health and sentinel species surveillance approaches; and the adaptation of health monitoring systems for appropriate developing country situations. New Directions of Conservation Medicine: Applied Cases of Ecological Health addressesthese issues with relevant case studies and detailed applied examples. New Directions of Conservation Medicine challenges the notion that human health is an isolated concern removed from the bounds of ecology and species interactions. Human health, animal health, and ecosystem health are movingcloser together and at some point, it will be inconceivable that there was ever a clear division.
Table of Contents
Foreword: Planet Doctorsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Contributorsp. xvii
Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice
Conservation Medicine: Ontogeny of an Emerging Disciplinep. 3
Ecohealth: Connecting Ecology Health, and Sustainabilityp. 17
One Health, One Medicinep. 33
Biodiversity and Human Healthp. 45
An Ecosystem Service of Biodiversity: The Protection of Human Health Against Infectious Diseasep. 56
Parasite Conservation, Conservation Medicine and Ecosystem Healthp. 67
Stress and Immunosuppression as Factors in the Decline and Extinction of Wildlife Populations: Concepts, Evidence, and Challengesp. 82
Anthropogenic Change and Conservation Medicine
Climate Change and Infectious Disease Dynamicsp. 111
Wildlife Health in a Changing North: A Model for Global Environmental Changep. 122
Habitat Fragmentation and Infectious Disease Ecologyp. 135
Wildlife Trade and the Spread of Diseasep. 151
Bushmeat and Infectious Disease Emergencep. 164
Human Migrationp. 179
Emerging Infectious Diseases and Conservation Medicine
Are Bats Exceptional Viral Reservoirs?p. 195
SARS: A Case Study for Factors Driving Disease Emergencep. 213
H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: Breaking the Rules in Disease Emergencep. 228
Bartonellosis: An Emerging Disease of Humans, Domestic Animals, and Wildlifep. 239
Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis Infections in Marine Mammalsp. 257
Infectious Cancers in Wildlifep. 270
From Protozoan Infection in Monarch Butterflies to Colony Collapse Disorder in Bees: Are Emerging Infectious Diseases Proliferating in the Insect World?p. 284
Fungal Diseases in Neotropical Forests Disturbed by Humansp. 302
Emerging Infectious Diseases in Fisheries and Aquaculturep. 312
Southern Sea Otters as Sentinels for Land-Sea Pathogens and Pollutantsp. 328
Ecotoxicology and Conservation Medicine
Ecotoxicology: Bridging Wildlife, Humans, and Ecosystemsp. 345
Wildlife Toxicology: Environmental Contaminants and Their National and International Regulationp. 359
Marine Biotoxins: Emergence of Harmful Algal Blooms as Health Threats to Marine Wildlifep. 374
Beluga from the St. Lawrence Estuary: A Case Study of Cancer and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbonsp. 390
Place-Based Conservation Medicine
Sense and Serendipity: Conservation and Management of Bison in Canadap. 409
Pathogens, Parks, and People: The Role of Bovine Tuberculosis in South African Conservationp. 423
Disease Ecology and Conservation of Ungulates, Wild Rabbits, and the Iberian Lynx in the Mediterranean Forestp. 439
The Kibale EcoHealth Project: Exploring Connections Among Human Health, Animal Health, and Landscape Dynamics in Western Ugandap. 452
Conservation Medicine in Brazil: Case Studies of Ecological Health in Practicep. 466
Linking Conservation of Biodiversity and Culture with Sustainable Health and Wellness: The Itzamma Model and Global Implications for Healing Across Culturesp. 479
Biological Diversity and Human Health: Using Plants and Traditional Ethnomedical Knowledge to Improve Public Health and Conservation Programs in Micronesiap. 493
Applied Techniques of Conservation Medicine
Human Health in the Biodiversity Hotspots: Applications of Geographic Information System Technology and Implications for Conservationp. 505
Determining When Parasites of Amphibians Are Conservation Threats to their Hosts: Methods and Perspectivesp. 521
Strategies for Wildlife Disease Surveillancep. 539
Wildlife Health Monitoring Systems in North America: From Sentinel Species to Public Policyp. 552
Epidemiologic Investigation of Infectious Pathogens in Marine Mammals: The Importance of Serum Banks and Statistical Analysisp. 563
Sorta Situ: The New Reality of Management Conditions for Wildlife Populations in the Absence of "Wild" Spacesp. 576
Modeling Population Viability and Extinction Risk in the Presence of Parasitismp. 590
Using Mathematical Models in a Unified Approach to Predicting the Next Emerging Infectious Diseasep. 607
Indexp. 619
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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