Catalogue


Dying on the job : murder and mayhem in the American workplace /
Ronald D. Brown.
imprint
Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2012.
description
xxi, 317 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1442218436 (Cloth), 9781442218437 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2012.
isbn
1442218436 (Cloth)
9781442218437 (Cloth)
contents note
Murder in the workplace : nature, scope, and origins -- Why so little is known about the problem -- Definitely not your average girl next door -- The limits of the human resources function -- Some were crazy, some not so crazy -- The influence of gender & race -- The problems and politics of being the "boss" -- Debunking the myths : confirming the facts -- Deciphering the "language" of workplace suicide -- The warning signs : the tick, tick, tick of the bomb -- Ironies trends, and troublesome facts -- Employer response, responsibility and resolve -- Guidelines for workplace safety, security, and control -- Conclusion.
abstract
"Dying on the Job is the first book on workplace violence to focus exclusively on workplace murder. While some perpetrators are certainly mentally impaired, many workplace murders are committed by people considered to be “normal.” Brown explores the various motives and drives that spark workplace murder, and answers hundreds of questions that are usually asked only after a workplace murder rampage has already occurred. Are men or women more likely to commit workplace homicide? How can people more easily spot those likely to commit workplace murder? What are some of the warning signs? How often is "suicide" used as workplace revenge? The answers to these questions and more are based on more than 350 actual cases of workplace murder, and the answers are often surprising. Brown also addresses different areas of prevention, counseling, and rehabilitation, and analyzes different approaches to gun control for both management and employees to make their job a safer place to work."--Publisher's website.
catalogue key
8748515
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-11-26:
Former assistant U.S. Attorney Brown repeatedly informs readers, twice in the introduction alone, that his is the first full-length book ever to cover workplace murder, in terms of killings involving employees and employers. This bent toward repetition, along with other flaws, ensures that his study falls short of its high-flown aims. Although Brown repeatedly states that his survey encompassed more than 350 separate incidents, the high-profile case of neurobiologist Amy Bishop takes up an inordinate amount of space. Unfounded assertions abound, such as that the actual number of workplace murders exceeds government statistics. The citations of sources such as wikiHow, for a list of safety recommendations, also do no favors to the actual evidence compiled. Discussions of the role played by race and gender tread dangerously close to stereotypes, while the concluding chapter's rambling discussion of "how the gun culture [is] antithetical to human industry and the work ethic" diverts valuable space from the workplace violence issue. Though no one can doubt the topic's importance, employees and employers alike may prefer to wait for others to cover it more satisfactorily. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, November 2012
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Summaries
Long Description
Dying on the Job is the first book on workplace violence to focus exclusively on workplace homicide, suggesting that not every perpetrator is criminally insane, that some are probably not crazy at all but normal folks, whose behavior was thus more preventable and within our control than we realize. It is also the only book on workplace violence that draws from more than three hundred actual cases of workplace homicide. Despite the prevailing assumption that perpetrators are all paranoid, psychopathic criminals, the evidence in case after case disproves this long held, but wrong, impression, and the common assumption does not hold up. While some are certainly mentally impaired, many workplace murders are committed by people considered to be normal. Here, Brown makes it clear that a surprisingly large number were not crazy at all, and instead were just regular workers who were simply pushed to the limit before they finally snapped in a homicidal rage. Inviting readers along to survey the various cases, Brown encourages readers to make their own conclusions and suggests that maybe a few were just like you and me. He concludes the work with a nod toward prevention, pointing out the warning signs and offering suggestions for how to handle such situations.
Long Description
Dying on the Job is the first book on workplace violence to focus exclusively on workplace murder between employee and employer, and over job-related issues. Brown suggests that not every perpetrator is criminally insane, that some are probably not crazy at all but normal folks, whose behavior was thus more preventable and within our control than we realize. It is also the only book on workplace violence that draws from more than three hundred and fifty actual cases of workplace homicide. Despite the prevailing assumption that perpetrators are all paranoid, psychopathic criminals, the evidence in case after case disproves this long held, but wrong, impression, and the common assumption does not hold up. While some are certainly mentally impaired, many workplace murders are committed by people considered to be normal. Here, Brown makes it clear that a surprisingly large number were not crazy at all, and instead were just regular workers who were simply pushed to the limit before they finally snapped in a homicidal rage. Inviting readers along to survey the various cases, Brown encourages readers to make their own conclusions and suggests that maybe a few were just like you and me. He concludes the work with a nod toward prevention, pointing out the warning signs and offering suggestions for how to handle such situations.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Murder in the Workplace: Nature, Scope, and Originsp. 1
Why So Little Is Known about the Problemp. 15
Definitely Not Your Average Girl Next Doorp. 33
The Limits of the Human Resources Functionp. 51
Some Were Crazy, Some Not So Crazyp. 69
The Influence of Gender and Racep. 85
The Problems and Politics of Being the Bossp. 101
Confirming the Facts/Debunking the Mythsp. 117
Deciphering the Language of Workplace Suicidep. 139
The Warning Signs: The Tick, Tick, Tick of the Human Bombp. 157
Ironies, Trends, and Troublesome Factsp. 175
Employer Response, Responsibility, and Resolvep. 193
Guidelines for Workplace Safety, Security, and Controlp. 209
Conclusion: Gun Culture, Productivity, and Profitsp. 225
Appendix of the Perpetrators in the Studyp. 241
Notesp. 251
Selected Bibliographyp. 297
Indexp. 301
About the Authorp. 317
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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