Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Rasputin : the untold story /
Joseph T. Fuhrmann.
imprint
Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, c2013.
description
xxvii, 284 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781118172766 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, c2013.
isbn
9781118172766 (cloth : acid-free paper)
contents note
The outsider -- Seeker and teacher -- Nicholas and Alexandra : waiting for a friend -- The new Rasputin -- The Church strikes back -- The Romanovs' holy fool -- The captain's mysterious report -- Black boars become bishops -- "You are our all" -- "God has heard your prayers" -- Spiritual crisis -- The woman with a missing nose -- Disaster lurks in Moscow -- The Tsar takes charge and loses control -- Rasputin conquers the Russian state -- The Church at the feet of a "low hound" -- "Our friend's ideas about men are sometimes queer" -- Shadows come at twilight -- The assassin -- Murder at the palace -- The aftermath -- Who really killed Rasputin?
general note
"Published simultaneously in Canada"--T.p. verso.
catalogue key
8748117
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-270) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Legend portrays Rasputin as the "Mad Monk" who rampaged through St. Petersburg in an alcoholic haze, making love to scores of women. A symbol of excess and religious extremism, he was believed to hold a mysterious power, emanating from his hypnotic eyes, over Tsar Nicolas II and his family. The fact that he was neither mad nor a monk has not stopped scores of writers from repeating these and other bogus claims. In Rasputin: The Untold Story, Rasputin scholar Joseph Fuhrmann shares the fruits of his two-decade search for the truth about Rasputin through previously closed Soviet archives. The man he discovers is entirely human and even more fascinating than the Svengali-like caricature imagined by millions. This definitive biography unveils the truth behind Gregory Rasputin's storied life, controversial relationships, and much-discussed death. Fuhrmann unearths previously unknown details from Rasputin's childhood and his early years as a farmer and itinerant preacher to his decade-long relationship with the Romanovs. This exposé features an account of the Church investigation into charges that Rasputin was a member of the heretical Khlysty, as well as the report from a new bishop that resolved the case in Rasputin's favor. It provides a new and accurate account of a deranged woman's attempt to murder Rasputin in the summer of 1914 and a pioneering exploration of Rasputin's and the Romanovs'surprising tolerance of homosexuals-men who were out of the closet and forging public careers that would have been inconceivable anywhere else in the world at the time. But what of Rasputin's mysterious powers? Was he a faith healer who actually stopped the hemophiliac tsarevich's bleeding at will? Could he hypnotize and control others with his eyes? Is it true that his murderers first poisoned, then shot, then beat him, before throwing him into an ice-choked river, where he finally drowned? Was British intelligence involved in the plot to murder Rasputin? Fuhrmann answers these questions and many more. Whether or not he possessed superpowers, Rasputin was an undeniably powerful figure who played an important role in the Russian Empire's collapse. Fuhrmann portrays Rasputin's relationship with Nicholas and Alexandra through previously unpublished letters from the tsar and his wife to Rasputin and excerpts from Rasputin's personal notebooks. Complete with many rare photos, including studio photographs of Rasputin, and samples of his handwriting, Rasputin: The Untold Story does more than set the record straight. It tells the powerful and tragic story of a man who started out with noble intentions and sincere convictions but fell victim to greed, lust, temptation, and his own power.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-10-15:
Previous studies of the Svengali-like Rasputin could not have benefitted from recently released archival information that had been sealed during the Soviet era. Fuhrmann (history, Murray State Univ.; Rasputin: A Life) adds this newly available material to previous scholarship and presents the whole as the definitive biography. His work answers the questions of how an uneducated, Siberian-born peasant, Grigory Efimovich Rasputin (1869-1916), became the closest confidante to Tsar Nicholas II and the tsarina, Alexandra, and what brought about his decline and eventual murder. Fuhrmann offers new facts about Rasputin's life from birth to death: how he inserted himself into Russian high society and the truth of his drunken debauchery and sexual addiction. Was he mystic, charlatan, or simply an opportunist? Fuhrman reveals his subject from all sides: husband, father, confidante, wily adviser, carouser, even kind-hearted paternal figure. VERDICT Looming, mysterious Rasputin has fascinated historians and Russian history enthusiasts ever since the final years of the Romanov dynasty. Wide-ranging in scope, this accessible book utilizes trustworthy sources and makes occasional use of plausible conjecture. Highly recommended for both Russian history scholars and readers with a general interest in the topic.-Lisa Guidarini, Algonquin P.L., IL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-08-06:
Using material from newly opened Soviet archives, particularly the correspondence of Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, Fuhrmann, an emeritus professor of history at Murray State University in Kentucky, extends the range of his Rasputin: A Life (1990). He shows how an obscure Russian Orthodox monk became a close adviser to the czar and czarina, particularly after he predicted the recovery of their son, Alexis, from a possibly fatal illness in 1909. Alexandra turned to him for advice on Russia's WWI military campaign, and he influenced the appointment of high officials. This outsize influence, and rumors that Rasputin was pro-German, impelled a cabal of members of the nobility to assassinate him in December 1916. Fuhrman provides graphic details of the murder and weighs the evidence that the British Secret Intelligence Service participated in the plot. Fuhrmann draws a complex portrait of a dissolute alcoholic figure who allegedly raped at least one woman, yet he was seen by his many followers as a starets (charismatic holy man). Fuhrmann does not provide a final appraisal of Rasputin's significance in the immediate prerevolution period. Still, this vivid, briskly written biography brings to life one of the most colorful and sinister figures in modern Russian history. Illus. Agent: Andrew Lownie, Andrew Lownie Literary Agency. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
* Using material from newly opened Soviet archives, particularly the correspondence of Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, Fuhrmann, an emeritus professor of history at Murray State University in Kentucky, extends the range of his Rasputin: A Life (1990). He shows how an obscure Russian Orthodox monk became a close adviser to the czar and czarina, particularly after he predicted the recovery of their son, Alexis, from a possibly fatal illness in 1909. Alexandra turned to him for advice on Russia's WWI military campaign, and he influenced the appointment of high officials. This outsize influence, and rumors that Rasputin was pro-German, impelled a cabal of members of the nobility to assassinate him in December 1916. Fuhrman provides graphic details of the murder and weighs the evidence that the British Secret Intelligence Service participated in the plot. Fuhrmann draws a complex portrait of a dissolute alcoholic figure who allegedly raped at least one woman, yet he was seen by his many followers as a starets (charismatic holy man). Fuhrmann does not provide a final appraisal of Rasputin's significance in the immediate prerevolution period. Still, this vivid, briskly written biography brings to life one of the most colorful and sinister figures in modern Russian history. Illus. Agent: Andrew Lownie, Andrew Lownie Literary Agency. (Nov.) ( Publishers Weekly , August 2012)
Using material from newly opened Soviet archives, particularly the correspondence of Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, Fuhrmann, an emeritus professor of history at Murray State University in Kentucky, extends the range of his Rasputin: A Life (1990). He shows how an obscure Russian Orthodox monk became a close adviser to the czar and czarina, particularly after he predicted the recovery of their son, Alexis, from a possibly fatal illness in 1909. Alexandra turned to him for advice on Russia's WWI military campaign, and he influenced the appointment of high officials. This outsize influence, and rumors that Rasputin was pro-German, impelled a cabal of members of the nobility to assassinate him in December 1916. Fuhrman provides graphic details of the murder and weighs the evidence that the British Secret Intelligence Service participated in the plot. Fuhrmann draws a complex portrait of a dissolute alcoholic figure who allegedly raped at least one woman, yet he was seen by his many followers as a starets (charismatic holy man). Fuhrmann does not provide a final appraisal of Rasputin's significance in the immediate prerevolution period. Still, this vivid, briskly written biography brings to life one of the most colorful and sinister figures in modern Russian history. Illus. Agent: Andrew Lownie, Andrew Lownie Literary Agency. (Nov.) ( Publishers Weekly , August 2012)
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, August 2012
Library Journal, October 2012
Boston Globe, November 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Based on new sources-the definitive biography of Rasputin, with revelations about his life, death, and involvement with the Romanovs A century after his death, Gregory Rasputin remains fascinating: the Russian peasant with hypnotic eyes who befriended Tsar Nicholas II and helped destroy the Russian Empire, but the truth about his strange life has never been fully told. Written by the world's leading authority on Rasputin, this new biography draws on previously closed Soviet archives to offer new information on Rasputin's relationship with Empress Alexandra, sensational revelations about his sexual conquests, a re-examination of his murder, and more. "A meticulously researched biography of Rasputin, combining previously unavailable Russian archive material with contemporary documents and memoirs to expose many of the myths and misconceptions about this enigmatic man. A riveting read." -Coryne Hall , author of Imperial Dancer: Mathilde Kschessinska and the Romanovs "With the benefit of new research, Joseph Fuhrmann takes us on a fascinating exploration of the life of one of history's most enigmatic characters, Gregory Yefimovich Rasputin. From Siberian childhood, to unimagined power at the heart of the Russian Imperial Family, to the drama of his assassination, it is a colorful and evocative journey." -Christopher Warwick , Royal Biographer and author of Ella: Princess, Saint, and Martyr "A startling and original account of the life of Gregory Rasputin based on extensive research in distant Siberian archives, recently opened police records, and a thoughtful analysis of the published literature. Rasputin: The Untold Story goes beyond the legends and the scandals to reveal both the human being and the personal tragedy that helped bring down the Russian Empire. In Fuhrmann's skilled hands, Rasputin is no longer simply a cardboard cut-out, a symbol of dissolution and sexual depravity. Fuhrmann reveals his subject's many humane qualities, and his real, though limited, ideas. No one intrigued by the last years of Imperial Russia will want to miss this book." -Richard G. Robbins Jr. , Professor Emeritus, University of New Mexico
Main Description
Based on new sources-the definitive biography of Rasputin, with revelations about his life, death, and involvement with the Romanovs
Main Description
Based on new sources--the definitive biography of Rasputin, with revelations about his life, death, and involvement with the Romanovs A century after his death, Grigory Rasputin remains fascinating: the Russian peasant with hypnotic eyes who befriended Tsar Nicholas II and helped destroy the Russian Empire, but the truth about his strange life has never fully been told. Written by the world's leading authority on Rasputin, this new biography draws on previously closed Soviet archives to offer new information on Rasputin's relationship with Empress Alexandra, sensational revelations about his sexual conquests, a re-examination of his murder, and more. Based on long-closed Soviet archives and the author's decades of research, encompassing sources ranging from baptismal records and forgotten police reports to notes written by Rasputin and personal letters Reveals new information on Rasputin's family history and strange early life, religious beliefs, and multitudinous sexual adventures as well as his relationship with Empress Alexandra, ability to heal the haemophiliac tsarevich, and more Includes many previously unpublished photos, including contemporary studio photographs of Rasputin and samples of his handwriting Written by historian Joesph T. Fuhrmann, a Rasputin expert whose 1990 biography Rasputin: A Life was widely praised as the best on the subject Synthesizing archival sources with published documents, memoirs, and other studies of Rasputin into a single, comprehensive work, Rasputin: The Untold Story will correct a century's worth of misconception and error about the life and death of the famous Siberian mystic and healer and the decline and fall of Imperial Russia.
Main Description
Based on new sources-the definitive biography of Rasputin, with revelations about his life, death, and involvement with the Romanovs A century after his death, Grigory Rasputin remains fascinating: the Russian peasant with hypnotic eyes who befriended Tsar Nicholas II and helped destroy the Russian Empire, but the truth about his strange life has never fully been told. Written by the world's leading authority on Rasputin, this new biography draws on previously closed Soviet archives to offer new information on Rasputin's relationship with Empress Alexandra, sensational revelations about his sexual conquests, a re-examination of his murder, and more. Based on long-closed Soviet archives and the author's decades of research, encompassing sources ranging from baptismal records and forgotten police reports to notes written by Rasputin and personal letters Reveals new information on Rasputin's family history and strange early life, religious beliefs, and multitudinous sexual adventures as well as his relationship with Empress Alexandra, ability to heal the haemophiliac tsarevich, and more Includes many previously unpublished photos, including contemporary studio photographs of Rasputin and samples of his handwriting Written by historian Joesph T. Fuhrmann, a Rasputin expert whose 1990 biography Rasputin: A Life was widely praised as the best on the subject Synthesizing archival sources with published documents, memoirs, and other studies of Rasputin into a single, comprehensive work, Rasputin: The Untold Story will correct a century's worth of misconception and error about the life and death of the famous Siberian mystic and healer and the decline and fall of Imperial Russia.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Cast of Principal Characters, Places, and Termsp. xix
Prologuep. 1
The Outsiderp. 3
Seeker and Teacherp. 15
Nicholas and Alexandra: Waiting for a Friendp. 31
The New Rasputinp. 39
The Church Strikes Backp. 49
The Romanovs' Holy Foolp. 57
The Captain's Mysterious Reportp. 67
Black Boars Become Bishopsp. 77
"You Are Our All"p. 87
"God Has Heard Your Prayers!"p. 97
Spiritual Crisisp. 107
The Woman with the Missing Nosep. 117
Disaster Lurks in Moscowp. 131
The Tsar Takes Charge and Loses Controlp. 143
Rasputin Conquers the Russian Statep. 155
The Church at the Feet of a "Low Hound"p. 167
"Our Friend's Ideas about Men Are Sometimes Queer"p. 177
Shadows Come at Twilightp. 185
The Assassinp. 197
Murder at the Palacep. 207
The Aftermathp. 215
Who Really Killed Rasputin?p. 225
Epiloguep. 233
Notesp. 241
Bibliographyp. 263
Photo Creditsp. 271
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem