Catalogue

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Women and Second Life : essays on virtual identity, work and play /
edited by Dianna Baldwin and Julie Achterberg.
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., c2013.
description
vi, 198 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786470216 (Paper), 9780786470211 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., c2013.
isbn
0786470216 (Paper)
9780786470211 (Paper)
abstract
"This collection of essays explores issues of identity, work and play in the virtual world of Second Life. Fourteen women explore their experiences. Topics include teaching, journalism, human rights, health care, identity, gender, race, and creativity. The text is unique, representing only women and their experiences in a world that is most often viewed as a man's world"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8748108
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dianna Baldwin is the associate director of the Writing Center at Michigan State University. She lives in Lansing. Julie Achterberg is a high school English and biology teacher. She lives in Haslett, Michigan.
Summaries
Main Description
This collection of new essays explores issues of identity, work and play in the virtual world of Second Life (SL). Fourteen women discuss their experiences. Topics include teaching in Second Life, becoming an SL journalist, and using SL as a means to bring human rights to health care; exploring issues of identity and gender such as performing the role of digital geisha, playing with gender crossing, or determining how identity is formed virtually; examining how race is perceived; and investigating creativity such as poetry writing or quilting.The text is unique in that it represents only women and their experiences in a world that is most often viewed as a man's world.
Main Description
This collection of new essays explores issues of identity, work and play in the virtual world of Second Life (SL). Fourteen women explore their experiences in this virtual environment. Topics include teaching in Second Life, becoming an SL journalist, and using SL as a means to bring human rights to health care; exploring issues of identity and gender such as performing the role of digital geisha, playing with gender crossing, or determining how identity is formed virtually; examining how race is perceived; and investigating creativity such as poetry writing or quilting. The text is unique in that it represents only women and their experiences in a world that is most often viewed as a man's world.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 1
Introduction: The Big Bang Theory, or the Creation of Second Lifep. 5
Life as Avatar
A Rainy Afternoon: A Reflective Process Utilizing an Avatar Personap. 15
Digital Geishap. 32
N00bs, M00bs and B00bs: An Exploration of Identity Formation in Second Lifep. 45
Gender and Race
My Second Life as a Cyber Border Crosserp. 63
Gender (Re)Production of "Emotion Work" and "Feeling Rules" in Second Lifep. 77
Work and Education
Zoe's Law for SL, or If It Can, It Will, So Expect Itp. 89
Exploring the Virtual World of Second Life to Help Bring Human Rights to Health Carep. 105
The Virtual Sky Is the Limit: Women's Journalism Experiences in Second Lifep. 116
If She Can Build It, She Willp. 135
Culture
Adventures in Fiberspace: Quilts and Quilting in Second Life Through the Virtual Eyes of lone Tigerpawp. 149
Creative Immersion and Inspiration in Second Life's Virtual Landscapesp. 160
About the Contributorsp. 189
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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