Catalogue


The future of US global power : delusions of decline /
Stuart S. Brown.
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
x, 321 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1137023155 (hbk.), 9781137023155 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
1137023155 (hbk.)
9781137023155 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8743826
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-309) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stuart S. Brown is a professor at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, USA. In addition to holding academic positions at Georgetown University and Smith College in the United States, he worked as an economist at the International Monetary Fund and as Chief Economist for Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East at BNP-Paribas and Bank of America.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Recent events have raised grave doubts regarding the condition and fate of America's once-untrammeled hegemonic power. Congress and the White House remain at loggerheads, providing little comfort to America's working classes. Little surprise, then, that confidence in America's hegemonic strength has been torn asunder. Yet Brown asks us to dig deeper. His sophisticated appraisal of American's micro- and macroeconomic foundations suggest the engine of US power remains in good health.' - Sean Clark, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada and Sabrina Hoque, Dalhousie University, Canada 'Supporting his views with a careful attention to facts and figures, Stuart Brown debunks the newest versions of 'declinism'. He examines US global power in all relevant dimensions and concludes that the era of US hegemony will be more long-lasting than many believe. Like a seasoned country rating analyst, he has examined all the factors affecting the creditworthiness of the US relative to China, Europe, and others. Amid the plethora of recent books on the global political/economic power struggle, this one stands out for its theoretical acumen and empirical comprehensiveness. The range of topics covered is impressive, including global imbalances, comparative productivity, trade relations, nuclear proliferation, government debt burdens, and public opinion on the projection of global power.' - David H. Levey 'Stuart Brown has authored a powerful rebuttal to the 'decline' school. To paraphrase Cassius, if American power does decline over the next two decades, "The fault will not be in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.' - Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Reginald Jones Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, USA
'Recent events have raised grave doubts regarding the condition and fate of America's once-untrammeled hegemonic power. Congress and the White House remain at loggerheads, providing little comfort to America's working classes. Little surprise, then, that confidence in America's hegemonic strength has been torn asunder. Yet Brown asks us to dig deeper. His sophisticated appraisal of American's micro- and macroeconomic foundations suggest the engine of US power remains in good health.' - Sean Clark, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada and Sabrina Hoque, Dalhousie University, Canada 'Supporting his views with a careful attention to facts and figures, Stuart Brown debunks the newest versions of "declinism". He examines US global power in all relevant dimensions and concludes that the era of US hegemony will be more long-lasting than many believe. Like a seasoned country rating analyst, he has examined all the factors affecting the creditworthiness of the US relative to China, Europe, and others. Amid the plethora of recent books on the global political/economic power struggle, this one stands out for its theoretical acumen and empirical comprehensiveness. The range of topics covered is impressive, including global imbalances, comparative productivity, trade relations, nuclear proliferation, government debt burdens, and public opinion on the projection of global power.' - David H. Levey 'Stuart Brown has authored a powerful rebuttal to the "decline" school. To paraphrase Cassius, if American power does decline over the next two decades, "The fault will not be in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.' - Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Reginald Jones Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, USA
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Refuting arguments of US secular decline, Stuart Brown provides a novel perspective on US global power projection today and over the coming decades
Long Description
Has the combination of protracted war, explosive indebtedness and mounting income inequality dealt a decisive blow to US global influence and stature? Has the 'rise of the rest' completely upended the distribution of global power? The flood of recent commentary bemoaning the end of American primacy would lead one to think so. Stuart Brown rejects this conventional wisdom, and argues that the US still maintains the composite economic, cultural, political and military underpinnings befitting a predominant global power. The causes and implications of US trade imbalances are too often misdiagnosed while the geopolitical challenge from China is grossly exaggerated. The US continues to lead in global affairs, disproportionately contributing to global peace and stability. In dispelling the major assumptions underlying the case for American decline, Brown paints an alternative picture of an enduring power of unparalleled capability and global impact.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. x
Introduction
Delusions of Decline: US Global Power in a Turbulent Erap. 3
Global Power: Key Issues
US Power: Past and Prologuep. 11
Dimensions of US Power, Decline and Overstretchp. 35
Material Underpinnings of Global Power
Microeconomic Foundations: Innovation, Productivity and Competitivenessp. 69
Macroeconomic Foundations: Global Imbalances and the Dollarp. 104
Global Public Goods and the Re-ascent of China
Human Security: US Leadership on Counter-Proliferationp. 133
Global Public Goods and East Asiap. 151
China's Challengep. 164
Domestic Constraints on US Power
The Deficitp. 189
Politicsp. 207
Conclusion: Maintaining Hegemonyp. 229
Notesp. 242
Bibliographyp. 263
Indexp. 310
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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