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Detroit's Cold War : the origins of postwar conservatism /
Colleen Doody.
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2013.
description
viii, 175 p.
ISBN
0252037278 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780252037276 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2013.
isbn
0252037278 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780252037276 (cloth : acid-free paper)
contents note
New Deal Detroit, Communism, and Anticommunism -- Labor and the Birth of the Postwar Red Scare, 1945-1950 -- Race and Anticommunism, 1945-1952 -- Anticommunism and Catholicism in Cold-War Detroit -- Business, Anticomunism, and the Welfare State, 1945-1958.
catalogue key
8738289
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [161]-168) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-06-01:
During WW II, Detroit, the nation's fourth most populous city, witnessed conflicts that accelerated after 1945 and came to both shape and reflect the contours of modern US conservatism. After a useful introduction, Doody (DePaul Univ.) focuses on divisive issues concerning labor, business, race, and religion. Never a comfortable fit, the United Auto Workers and the giant automakers clashed repeatedly after the war. The former accused the latter of trying to dismantle New Deal legislation and block further gains for workers; the latter denounced government interference, associated unions with collectivism, and preached laissez-faire economics. Meanwhile, a large influx of African Americans from the South during and after the war heightened racial tensions and led to increased segregated housing and white flight to the suburbs. Advocates of religious values, especially Roman Catholics, attacked the inroads of secularism, affirmed traditional gender values, and denounced the Communist threat abroad. Doody notes that the Cold War in the Motor City reflected domestic issues at least as forcibly as, if not more than, foreign developments. A scholarly, readable monograph, her book merits careful attention. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General collections, graduate students, faculty. R. Muccigrosso emeritus, Brooklyn College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Colleen Doody makes the important argument that deep-seated social and political conflicts--which were not always linked to the actual communist movement--produced the extraordinary wave of anticommunism that gripped the country during the decade after World War II." --Joshua B. Freeman, author ofWorking-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II
"Colleen Doody makes the important argument that deep-seated social and political conflicts-which were not always linked to the actual communist movement-produced the extraordinary wave of anticommunism that gripped the country during the decade after World War II." Joshua B. Freeman, author of Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Detroit's Cold War' locates the roots of American conservatism in a city that was a nexus of labour and industry in post-war America. Drawing on meticulous archival research focusing on Detroit, Colleen Doody shows how conflict over business values and opposition to labor, anticommunism, racial animosity, and religion led to the development of a conservative ethos in the aftermath of World War II.
Main Description
Detroit's Cold Warlocates the roots of American conservatism in a city that was a nexus of labor and industry in postwar America. Drawing on meticulous archival research focusing on Detroit, Colleen Doody shows how conflict over business values and opposition to labor, anticommunism, racial animosity, and religion led to the development of a conservative ethos in the aftermath of World War II. Using Detroit--with its large population of African-American and Catholic immigrant workers, strong union presence, and starkly segregated urban landscape--as a case study, Doody articulates a nuanced understanding of anticommunism during the Red Scare. Looking beyond national politics, she focuses on key debates occurring at the local level among a wide variety of common citizens. In examining this city's social and political fabric, Doody illustrates that domestic anticommunism was a cohesive, multifaceted ideology that arose less from Soviet ideological incursion than from tensions within the American public.
Main Description
Detroit's Cold War locates the roots of American conservatism in a city that was a nexus of labour and industry in post-war America. Drawing on meticulous archival research focusing on Detroit, Colleen Doody shows how conflict over business values and opposition to labor, anticommunism, racial animosity, and religion led to the development of a conservative ethos in the aftermath of World War II. Using Detroit-with its large population of African- American and Catholic workers, strong union presence, and starkly segregated urban landscape-as a case study, Doody articulates a nuanced understanding of anticommunism during the Red Scare. Looking beyond national politics, she focuses on key debates occurring at the local level among a wide variety of common citizens. In examining this city's social and political fabric, Doody illustrates that domestic anticommunism was a cohesive, multifaceted ideology that arose less from Soviet ideological incursion than from tensions within the American public.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
New Deal Detroit, Communism, and Anti-Communismp. 9
Labor and the Birth of the Postwar Red Scare, 1945-1950p. 9
Race and Anti-Communism, 1945-1952p. 46
Anti-Communism and Catholicism in Cold-War Detroitp. 76
Business, Anti-Communism, and the Welfare State, 1945-1958p. 93
Conclusionp. 119
Notesp. 125
Works Citedp. 161
Indexp. 169
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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