Catalogue


The life and death of the radical historical Jesus /
David Burns.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2013.
description
xii, 275 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199929505 (Cloth), 9780199929504 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
series title
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2013.
isbn
0199929505 (Cloth)
9780199929504 (Cloth)
contents note
Introduction : the human being from Galilee -- The birth of the radical historical Jesus -- The militant and lowly historical Jesus -- The radical historical Jesus in action -- The clash of Christs -- The fireman of Terre Haute -- Epilogue : the afterlife of the radical historical Jesus.
catalogue key
8737299
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this superb book, David Burns reclaims one of our nation's most important, but also most neglected, radical traditions. In rediscovering the democratic, and socialist, and feminist, Jesuses of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America, Burns offers a significant intervention into how we view the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. He also provides a creative new way for us to think about the connection between secularism, religious thought, and politics throughout our nation's past."--Robert D. Johnston, author ofThe Radical Middle Class: Populist Democracy and the Question ofCapitalism in Progressive Era Portland, Oregon "David Burns examines a fascinating intellectual movement that viewed Jesus as mortal, and held that Jesus' contribution lay with his example of human solidarity, not with the supernatural actions attributed to him. Now mainly forgotten, this movement had a profound impact on late nineteenth-century American thought. By excavating this worldly Jesus, Burns challenges the standard narrative that overstates the role of Protestant and Evangelical belief in Gilded Age intellectual life."--Charles Postel, author ofThe Populist Vision "This book's fascinating story is set in the America of 1870 to 1920 and focuses on a 'Christ constructed by radicals who denied the divine, scorned the supernatural and secularized the sacred.' Its opening pages, for example, cite debate in theMachinists' Monthly Journalof 1906 about whether the economic face of Christianity can be (no!) or must be (yes!) Socialism. This is a powerful and persuasive, timely and timeless, account of how those in positions of religious power and political privilege can cloak Jesus in layers of glorious irrelevance but how his economic radicalism surfaces again and again among those of kindred conscience."--John Dominic Crossan, Professor Emeritus, DePaul
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In this cultural and intellectual history, David Burns contends that the influence of biblical criticism in America was more widespread than has been thought. Burns proves this point by uncovering the hidden history of the radical historical Jesus, a construct created and sustained by freethinkers, feminists, socialists, and anarchists during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. The result of this exploration is a new narrative revealing that Cyrenus Ward, Caroline Bartlett, George Herron, Bouck White, and other radical religionists had an impact on the history of religion in America rivaling that of recognized religious intellectuals such as Shailer Mathews, Charles Briggs, Francis Peabody, and Walter Rauschenbusch. The methods utilized by radical religionists were different from those employed by elite liberal divines, however, and part of a larger struggle over the relationship between religion and civilization. There were numerous reasons for this conflict, but Burns argues that the primary cause was that key radical religionists used Ernest Renan'sThe Life of Jesusto create an imaginative brand of biblical criticism that struck a balance between the demands of reason and the doctrines of religion. And this measured approach allowed Robert Ingersoll, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Eugene Debs, and other secular-minded thinkers who sought to purge Christianity of its supernatural dimensions to still find something wonderful in the religious imagination and make common cause with an ancient peasant from Galilee. This provocative blend of reason and religion produced a vibrant countercultural movement that spanned communities, classes, and creeds and makesThe Life and Death of the Radical Historical Jesusa book that deserves a wide readership in an era when public intellectuals and politicians on both the left and right draw rigid lines between the secular and the sacred.
Main Description
In this cultural and intellectual history, David Burns contends that the influence of biblical criticism in America was more widespread than previously thought. Burns proves this point by uncovering the hidden history of the radical historical Jesus, a construct created and sustained byfreethinkers, feminists, socialists and anarchists during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. The result of this exploration is a new narrative revealing that Cyrenus Osborne Ward, Caroline Bartlett, George Herron, Bouck White, and other radical religionists had an impact on the history of religionin America rivaling that of recognized religious intellectuals such as Shailer Mathews, Charles Briggs, Francis Peabody, and Walter Rauschenbusch. The methods and approaches utilized by radical religionists were different from those employed by elite liberal divines, however, and part of a larger struggle over the relationship between religion and civilization. There were numerous reasons for this conflict, but, as Burns argues, the primaryone was that radicals used Ernest Renan's The Life of Jesus to create an imaginative brand of biblical criticism that struck a balance between the demands of reason and the doctrines of religion. Thus, while radical religionists like Robert Ingersoll, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Eugene Debs weresecular-minded thinkers who sought to purge Christianity of its supernatural dimensions, they believed the religious imagination that enabled modern day radicals to make common cause with an ancient peasant from Galilee was something wonderful. This provocative blend of reason and religion produced a vibrant countercultural movement that spanned communities, classes, and creeds and makes The Life and Death of the Radical Historical Jesus a book that deserves a wide readership in an era when public intellectuals and politicians on both theleft and right draw rigid lines between the secular and the sacred.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: The Human Being from Galileep. 3
The Birth of the Radical Historical Jesusp. 14
The Militant and Lowly Historical Jesusp. 47
The Radical Historical Jesus in Actionp. 82
The Clash of Christsp. 126
The Fireman of Terre Hautep. 162
Epilogue: The Afterlife of the Radical Historical Jesusp. 198
Notesp. 217
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem