Catalogue


The Coptic papacy in Islamic Egypt (641-1517) [electronic resource] /
Mark N. Swanson.
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, c2010.
description
xxii, 226 p.
ISBN
9789774160936
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, c2010.
isbn
9789774160936
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8732533
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of "apostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance" were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, shows that the medieval Coptic popes (641-1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new, the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witness within the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as 'living martyrs' in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of a resilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of the medieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.
Main Description
In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of 'œapostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance' were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, shows that the medieval Coptic popes (641'1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new, the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witness within the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as 'living martyrs' in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of a resilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of the medieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.
Main Description
In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of 'apostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance' were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, shows that the medieval Coptic popes (641-1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new,the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witness within the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as 'living martyrs' in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of a resilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of the medieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.
Main Description
In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of 'apostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance' were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, showsthat the medieval Coptic popes (641-1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new, the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witnesswithin the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as 'living martyrs' in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of aresilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of themedieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.
Main Description
In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of Sapostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, shows that the medieval Coptic popes (641 “1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new, the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witness within the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as living martyrs " in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of a resilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of the medieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.
Table of Contents
Editors' Introductionp. ix
Author's Prefacep. xi
Technical Notesp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Abbreviationsp. xix
Continuity and Reinvention
Succession and Innovationp. 1
Earning the "Crown of Exile"p. 2
The Church in a "New World Order"p. 4
Relationships with Rulersp. 6
A Sacred Geographyp. 11
Patient Sufferers
Coming to the End-Time?p. 15
Bearing Trials Patientlyp. 16
The Account of John the Deaconp. 18
Patriarchs and Martyrdomp. 21
Patriarchs and Sainthoodp. 25
Crisis of Cohesion
Satan Hinders, but God Prevailsp. 27
Patriarchs and Political Authority in 'Abbasid Egyptp. 28
Trials from Withoutp. 31
Trials from Withinp. 35
A Crisis of Cohesion?p. 37
A Battered Churchp. 37
Ignorance and Heresyp. 37
Conversionp. 38
Hanging Onp. 40
Embattled Saintsp. 41
Saints and Sinners
Bishop Michael's Account: Warts and Allp. 43
Before the Fatimidsp. 44
Simony: "The Word of God Became as a Merchandise"p. 46
Contrapuntal Saintlinessp. 47
Unexpected Saintlinessp. 52
Saints and Sinnersp. 56
Transitions
Language Shift, Lay Concerns, and Ecclesiastical Historyp. 59
Arabic as a Christian Language?p. 59
Mawhub: A Historian between Two Worldsp. 61
Ibn al-Qulzumi: A Critic of Patriarchsp. 66
Gabriel II ibn Turayk: An Attempt at Reformp. 67
Introduction: New Sourcesp. 67
Strange Religiosity, Ready Conversionp. 68
Linguistic In/competencep. 71
Opposition to Reformp. 74
After the Reform Attemptp. 76
How to Choose a Patriarchp. 76
Lay Concerns, Lay Leadershipp. 77
Tired Theology?p. 79
Chaos and Glory
A Strange Periodp. 83
Chroniclersp. 84
The Person at the Center of the Storyp. 85
1216-1217: Attempts at Making a Popep. 86
The Monk Da'ud Becomes Pope Cyril, Successor of Saint Markp. 88
Cyril's Patriarchatep. 89
A Failed "Great Man"? Or a Scholar among Scholars?p. 93
Marginalized Patriarchs
Internal Rivalry, External Interferencep. 97
Scattered Portrayals, Incidental Mentionsp. 100
The Patriarch at the Center of the Storyp. 105
A Burst of Holiness
The Patriarch as Saint and Holy Manp. 107
An Orchestra of Holiness? The Principalsp. 110
A Holy Monk: Marqus al-Antunip. 110
A Faithful Disciple: Ibrahim al-Fanip. 112
An Independent Saint: Anba Ruwaysp. 112
A Quarter and a Chorus?p. 114
Humility in Action
After the Fireworksp. 119
"Listless" and "Lacking in Blessing"?p. 120
Diplomacy and Faithfulnessp. 123
Quiet Leadership in Difficult Timesp. 125
Epilogue: Survivalp. 129
Appendix: The Forty-Nine Martyrs during the Patriarchate of Matthew I (#87, 1378-1408)p. 133
Works Cited: Primary Sourcesp. 135
Works Cited: Secondary Sourcesp. 141
Notesp. 157
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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