Catalogue


Hollywood's representations of the Sino-Tibetan conflict : politics, culture, and globalization /
Jenny George Daccache and Brandon Valeriano.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xiv, 235 p.
ISBN
1137290471 (alk. paper), 9781137290472 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
1137290471 (alk. paper)
9781137290472 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
8729125
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-219), filmography (p.s 221-222), and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jenny George Daccache is a doctoral candidate in Media Studies at the Doctoral School of Literature, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Lebanese University, Lebanon. She is a scholar of media, culture, politics, and Hollywood films. Brandon Valeriano is a lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of Glasgow.
Reviews
Review Quotes
This book is a creative and original effort to assess the interdependence of a prominent issue in the world Tibet's status in relation to China with the role played by the entertainment industry. Daccache and Valeriano offer a penetrating analysis of how the role of Hollywood has evolved over time in depicting the events. The trend in Hollywood toward a more positive portrayal is a cause for optimism about long-term resolution of the conflict over Tibet. This highly accessible book is a 'must read' for those with an interest in politics, globalization, cultural studies or the entertainment industry. Patrick James, Dornsife Dean's Professor of International Relations, USC
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Summaries
Long Description
In this interdisciplinary study, Jenny George Daccache and Brandon Valeriano analyze Hollywood's shift in its depictions of China and Tibet. 1997 saw the releases of Red Corner, Seven Years in Tibet, and Kundun, all of which were condemned by China. In recent years, however, China and Hollywood have moved toward being allies and collaborators. As Hollywood needs China for its vast potential market, China also needs Hollywood in order to increase its soft power. Using film as a lens through which we can witness global transformations in politics, economy, culture, and communication, the authors dissect Hollywood's engagement with Asia, examine the historical background of relationships between the West, China, and Tibet, and critically evaluate films produced by Hollywood that engage China and the Tibetan region.
Main Description
In this interdisciplinary study, Jenny George Daccache and Brandon Valeriano analyze Hollywood's shift in its depictions of China and Tibet. Only fifteen years ago, 1997 saw the releases of Red Corner, Seven Years in Tibet, and Kundun, all of which were condemned by China. Yet since then, China and Hollywood have moved toward being allies and collaborators. As Hollywood needs China for its vast potential market, China also needs Hollywood in order to increase its soft power. Using film as a lens though which one can witness the global transformations in politics, economy, culture, and communication, the authors dissect Hollywood's engagement with Asia, examine the historical background of relationships between the West, China, and Tibet, and critically evaluate films produced by Hollywood that engage China and the Tibetan region.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Figuresp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introduction: Hollywood, China, and Tibet: A Brief Overviewp. 1
China and Tibet through Western Eyesp. 21
The Divergence in the Portrayal of China and Tibet by Hollywood: The Yellow Peril versus the Land of Spiritualityp. 35
Hollywood and the Sino-Tibetan Conflictp. 65
Political Messages and Cultural Realities: Modern China and Tibet in the Hollywood Imagep. 85
Accuracy versus Propaganda in Hollywood Cinema: False Depictions of China, Tibet, and Their Protracted Conflictp. 101
The Hollywood Effect and Tibet: A Study of Media Effectiveness and the Current Free Tibet Movementp. 129
The Paradox of Globalization: Hollywood's Ethnocultural Context Encounters the Global Marketplacep. 147
Conclusion: Hollywood, China, and Tibet: A Path Forwardp. 177
Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 205
Filmographyp. 221
General Indexp. 223
Film Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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