Catalogue


Abolition and empire in Sierra Leone and Liberia /
Bronwen Everill.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
ix, 232 p.
ISBN
113702867X (hbk.), 9781137028679 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
113702867X (hbk.)
9781137028679 (hbk.)
contents note
Part I. Foundations -- Transatlantic Anti-Slavery Networks -- An African Middle Class -- Americans in Africa -- Part II. Interactions -- The Abolitionist Propaganda War -- Slave Trade Interventionism -- Commercial Rivalry and Liberian Independence -- Arguments for Colonial Expansion -- Epilogue: 1861 and Beyond.
catalogue key
8724867
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 206-221) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Bronwen Everill is Assistant Professor of Global History at Warwick University, UK. She completed her PhD at King's College London and held a research fellowship at Oxford University. Her teaching and research focus on the history of imperial humanitarianism in Africa.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-08-01:
Everill (Warwick Univ., UK) comparatively examines the Anglo-Atlantic abolitionist movement to illustrate the similarities and differences within the early-19th-century development of Sierra Leone and Liberia. The author demonstrates that while an international anti-slavery movement suggests a sense of unity, in reality the decisions to create, settle, and govern Sierra Leone and Liberia differed in Britain and the US, notwithstanding the collaboration that existed. Everill shows that over time, rivalries developed between the British and US abolitionist movements that hindered collaboration and created problems for both settlements. The work does an excellent job of exploring the relationship between imperial desires and each state's involvement within their African settlements, while paying particular attention to the individuals involved. Everill logically moves between the international and national abolitionist movements and the leaders of the settlements to demonstrate how changes within each nation influenced their relations with their own settlement and that of the other. Of particular interest is the focus on the consequences of the civilizing mission within West Africa and the role that "legitimate trade," which existed alongside a continued Atlantic slave trade, played in each settlement's internal and external development. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. M. Reese Univ. of North Dakota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2013
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Summaries
Long Description
Anti-slavery colonies settlements for freed slaves that were intended to prevent the slave trade in West Africa were established by both American and British societies. Although they occasionally attempted to work together in support of these settlements and their anti-slave trade goals, the societies were more frequently in conflict. Looking for the origin of this Anglo-American rivalry, this book applies a comparative approach to freed slave settlers in Sierra Leone and Liberia. It examines the foundations of these societies, their contribution to the development of 'Civilization, Commerce, and Christianity' as a practical approach to anti-slavery interventions in West Africa, and the points of conflict between them that fed rivalries in America and Britain.
Main Description
Anti-slavery colonies - settlements for freed slaves that were intended to prevent the slave trade in West Africa - were established by both American and British societies. Although they occasionally attempted to work together in support of these settlements and their anti-slave trade goals, the societies were more frequently in conflict. Looking for the origin of this Anglo-American rivalry, this book applies a comparative approach to freed slave settlers in Sierra Leone and Liberia. It examines the foundations of these societies, their contribution to the development of 'Civilization, Commerce, and Christianity' as a practical approach to anti-slavery interventions in West Africa, and the points of conflict between them that fed rivalries in America and Britain.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Bronwen Everill offers a new perspective on African global history, applying a comparative approach to freed slave settlers in Sierra Leone and Liberia to understand their role in the anti-slavery colonization movements of Britain and America.
Description for Bookstore
An exploration of the relationship between Sierra Leone and Liberia in the mid-nineteenth century and their contribution to developing ideas of anti-slavery intervention in Britain and America
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Mapsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Foundations
Transatlantic Anti-Slavery Networksp. 17
An African Middle Classp. 33
Americans in Africap. 55
Interactions
The Abolitionist Propaganda Warp. 81
Slave Trade Interventionismp. 107
Commercial Rivalry and Liberian Independencep. 128
Arguments for Colonial Expansionp. 148
Epilogue: 1861 and Beyondp. 173
Notesp. 181
Bibliographyp. 206
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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