Catalogue


The Army in Cromwellian England, 1649-1660 /
Henry Reece.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013.
description
xv, 267 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198200633, 9780198200635
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0198200633
9780198200635
catalogue key
8723076
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [235]-255) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
an excellent treatment of the ... day-to-day experience of the peacetime army of the Commonwealth and Protectorate ... As this body of men was, beyond doubt, the empowering force of English (and indeed British and Irish) political developments between 1647 and 1660, to achieve such a well-rounded portrait of it is extremely valuable.
Henry Reece has given us a study of major importance, finely judged, stimulating, and based on massive and impeccable research.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
From 1649 to 1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. This study describes the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. It offers new perspectives on Oliver Cromwell, the major-generals, and the reasons for the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660.
Long Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. Split into three parts, the first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, promotion structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society by establishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvementof army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army's role in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbled so pitifully in the last months of the Commonwealth.
Long Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. The book is split into three parts. The first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, promotion structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society by establishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensiveinvolvement of army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army's role in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbled so pitifully in the last months of theCommonwealth.
Long Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. The book is split into three parts. The first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, Put forward for the Whitfield book prize (Royal Historical Society) 2013 structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society by establishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects ofthe army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvement of army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army's role in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbledso pitifully in the last months of the Commonwealth.
Main Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. Split into three parts, the first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, promotion structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society by establishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvement of army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army's role in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbled so pitifully in the last months of the Commonwealth.
Main Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. Split into three parts, the first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, promotion structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society byestablishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvement of army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army'srole in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbled so pitifully in the last months of the Commonwealth.
Main Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. InThe Army in Cromwellian EnglandHenry Reece describes, for the first time, the nature of that experience, both for members of the army and for civilian society. Split into three parts, the first section looks at the size of the army, its material needs, promotion structure, and political engagement to provide a sense of the day-to-day reality of being part of a standing army. The second part considers the impact of the military presence on society by establishing where soldiers were quartered, how they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvement of army officers in the government of the localities. The final section re-evaluates the army's role in the political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, and explains why the army crumbled so pitifully in the last months of the Commonwealth.
Main Description
From 1649-1660 England was ruled by a standing army for the only time in its history. In The Army in Cromwellian England Henry Reece describes the nature of that experience for the first time, both for officers and soldiers and for civilian society. The book is structured in three parts. The first section seeks to capture the experience of being a member of a peacetime standing army, and to establish the character of the army: its varying size, the reasons why men joined and remained in service, how long they served for, what officers and their men spent their time doing in peacetime, the criteria governing promotion, and the way in which officers and soldiers engaged with political issues as the army's role changed from the pressure-group politics of the late 1640s to the Institutionalization of its power after 1653. The second part explores the impact of the military presence on civilian society by establishing where soldiers were quartered and garrisoned, how effectively and regularly they were paid, the material burden that they represented, the divisive effects on some major towns of the army's patronage of religious radicals, and the extensive involvement of army officers in the government of the localities, both before and after the brief appearance of Cromwell's Major-Generals. The final section pulls together the themes from the earlier parts of the book by re-evaluating the army's role in political events from Cromwell's death to the restoration of the Stuart monarchy: it describes how the issues of the rapidly increasing size of the army, shortage of pay, civil-military clashes, and the exercise of military authority at local level contributed to the climate of disorder and uncertainty in 1659-1660; and delineates how and why the army that had occupied London, purged parliament, and executed Charles I in the late 1640s could acquiesce so passively in the restoration of the monarchy in 1659-1660. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xiv
Notep. xvi
Introductionp. 1
The Character of the Army
A Standing Armyp. 21
Promotion and Patronagep. 35
Political Engagementp. 47
The Army and Society
The Garrisoning and Quartering of the Armyp. 77
The Provision of Pay to the Armyp. 88
The Material Impact of the Military Presencep. 97
The Religious Impact of the Military Presencep. 116
The Army and the Government of the Localitiesp. 138
The Army and the End of the Republic
The Military Presence Uncheckedp. 173
The Demise of the Armyp. 189
Conclusionp. 225
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem