Catalogue

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New Brunswick's early roads : the routes that shaped the province /
Ronald Rees.
imprint
Halifax, N.S. : Nimbus pub., 2012.
description
x, 190 p. : ill., map, ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1551099349, 9781551099347
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Halifax, N.S. : Nimbus pub., 2012.
isbn
1551099349
9781551099347
catalogue key
8721923
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 184-189)
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ronald Rees is a former professor of historical geography at the University of Saskatchewan and, as adjunct professor, at Mount Allison University. He has written books on the landscape and settlement of the Canadian prairies, on garden history, on science and industry in nineteenth-century Wales, and on United Empire Loyalist settlements in the Maritimes. He was born in Wales and for the past twenty-five years has lived in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.
Summaries
Long Description
Except for Roman military roads and the Inca roads in Peru, roads and road-making have seldom attracted much attention. Like fields, fences and old stone walls, roads can seem so much part of the fabric of a landscape that we need reminding that many of them were made intentionally. In New Brunswick, road-building was a great labor performed, as elsewhere, without fuss by often reluctant workers drawn from a remarkably small population. Against heavy odds, New Brunswick by 1930 had roads and a highway system that, in terms of quality and coverage, was the envy of many larger provinces. A new addition to the Images of Our Past series, New Brunswick's Early Roads follows the development of the province's roadways through the era of post and military roads, the rise of the Good Roads movement, to the dominance of the automobile and paved highways.Over 60 remarkable black and white images document the astonishing process.
Main Description
Except for Roman military roads and the Inca roads in Peru, roads and road-making have seldom attracted much attention. Like fields, fences and old stone walls, roads can seem so much part of the fabric of a landscape that we need reminding that many of them were made intentionally. In New Brunswick, road-building was a great labour performed, as elsewhere, without fuss by often reluctant workers drawn from a remarkably small population. Against heavy odds, New Brunswick by 1930 had roads and a highway system that, in terms of quality and coverage, was the envy of many larger provinces.
Main Description
Except for Roman military roads and the Inca roads in Peru, roads and road-making have seldom attracted much attention. Like fields, fences and old stone walls, roads can seem so much part of the fabric of a landscape that we need reminding that many of them were made intentionally. In New Brunswick, road-building was a great labour performed, as elsewhere, without fuss by often reluctant workers drawn from a remarkably small population. Against heavy odds, New Brunswick by 1930 had roads and a highway system that, in terms of quality and coverage, was the envy of many larger provinces. A new addition to the Images of Our Past series, New Brunswick's Early Roads follows the development of the province's roadways through the era of post and military roads, the rise of the Good Roads movement, to the dominance of the automobile and paved highways Over 60 remarkable black and white images document the astonishing process.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. iv
Military and Post Roadsp. 1
Settlement Roadsp. 25
Great Roads and Byroadsp. 65
Bridgesp. 105
The Good Roads Movementp. 131
Hard-Surfaced Roadsp. 165
Epiloguep. 177
Acknowledgementsp. 183
Bibliographyp. 184
Image Creditsp. 190
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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