Catalogue


A companion to Eastern European cinemas [electronic resource] /
edited by Anikó Imre.
imprint
Malden : Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
description
xvii, 525 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
1444337254 (hardback : alk. paper), 9781444337259 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Malden : Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
isbn
1444337254 (hardback : alk. paper)
9781444337259 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8710312
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-07-01:
This volume is a departure from many of the cliches of earlier Eastern European media studies viewed through the lens of Communist ideology. Imre (Univ. of Southern California) collects 25 essays that challenge outdated modes of examination, revealing Eastern European cinema's connection to European, transnational, and global media productions. The essayists are not only prominent academic scholars, but also media experts currently involved with film and media production in Eastern Europe. The essays offer lucid discussion of such films as Taxidermia, El Perro Negro, and Breakfast on the Grass and explore the work of directors Tamas Almasi, Walerian Borowczyk, Roman Polanski, and Karel Vachek, among others. Arranged in four parts--"New Theoretical and Critical Frameworks," "Historical and Spatial Redefinitions," "Aesthetic (Re)visions," and "Industries and Institutions"--the book breaks down the monolithic idea of national cinema, shows the influence of Western Europe during the socialist period, and links Eastern European cinemas to global film studies. While there is no filmography, the volume does have a useful index. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. B. M. McNeal emerita, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Challenges outdated modes of examination, revealing Eastern European cinemas connection to European, transnational, and global media productions ... Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above." ( Choice, 1 July 2013)
"Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above." ( Choice, 1 July 2013)
" A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas is a much awaited successor to Imre's previous book, East European Cinemas . It brings together an impressive range of scholars who widen the initial discussion, arguing for the critical importance of socialist and postsocialist film cultures in a larger network of global and transnational media studies." - Katarzyna Marciniak, author of Streets of Crocodiles: Photography, Media, and Postsocialist Landscapes in Poland
" A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas is a much awaited successor to Imre's previous book, East European Cinemas . It brings together an impressive range of scholars who widen the initial discussion, arguing for the critical importance of socialist and postsocialist film cultures in a larger network of global and transnational media studies." - Katarzyna Marciniak, author of Streets of Crocodiles: Photography, Media, and Postsocialist Landscapes in Poland "This volume reframes outdated paradigms, retranslates the canons and enlists new sources, vigorously shaking up the big picture of cinema in Europe." - Natasa Durovicova, University of Iowa
"Challenges outdated modes of examination, revealing Eastern European cinema's connection to European, transnational, and global media productions ... Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above." ( Choice, 1 July 2013)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas showcases twenty-five essays written by established and emerging film scholars that trace the history of Eastern European cinemas and offer an up-to-date assessment of post-socialist film cultures. Showcases critical historical work and up-to-date assessments of post-socialist film cultures Features consideration of lesser known areas of study, such as Albanian and Baltic cinemas, popular genre films, cross-national distribution and aesthetics, animation and documentary Places the cinemas of the region in a European and global context Resists the Cold War classification of Eastern European cinemas as "other" art cinemas by reconnecting them with the main circulation of film studies Includes discussion of such films as Taxidermia , El Perro Negro , 12:08 East of Bucharest Big Tõll , and Breakfast on the Grass and explores the work of directors including Tamás Almási, Walerian Borowczyk, Roman Polanski, Jerzy Skolimowski, Andrzej uawski, and Karel Vachek amongst many others
Main Description
A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas showcases twenty-five essays written by established and emerging film scholars that trace the history of Eastern European cinemas and offer an up-to-date assessment of post-socialist film cultures. Showcases critical historical work and up-to-date assessments of post-socialist film cultures Features consideration of lesser known areas of study, such as Albanian and Baltic cinemas, popular genre films, cross-national distribution and aesthetics, animation and documentary Places the cinemas of the region in a European and global context Resists the Cold War classification of Eastern European cinemas as "other" art cinemas by reconnecting them with the main circulation of film studies Includes discussion of such films as Taxidermia , El Perro Negro , 12:08 East of Bucharest Big Tõll , and Breakfast on the Grass and explores the work of directors including Tamás Almási, Walerian Borowczyk, Roman Polanski, Jerzy Skolimowski, Andrzej ¯u³awski, and Karel Vachek amongst many others
Long Description
A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas is the first comprehensive exploration of Eastern European film cultures. Featuring contributions from both established and emerging film scholars, essays trace the development of Eastern European cinemas utilizing a variety of approaches-from political, economic, and cultural contexts to aesthetics and themes pertinent to the cinemas of the post-Soviet region. Topics explored include well-established areas of film study such as dissident national art cinemas and auteurs, as well as issues that have received scant attention-popular cinemas, transnational production, distribution and exhibition, and the effects of Europeanization and global media convergence on film cultures. More than 20 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas offers a timely reassessment of the cinematic traditions of Eastern Europe while paving the way for future areas of study.
Main Description
A Companion to Eastern European Cinemas showcases twenty-five essays written by established and emerging film scholars that trace the history of Eastern European cinemas and offer an up-to-date assessment of post-socialist film cultures. Showcases critical historical work and up-to-date assessments of post-socialist film cultures Features consideration of lesser known areas of study, such as Albanian and Baltic cinemas, popular genre films, cross-national distribution and aesthetics, animation and documentary Places the cinemas of the region in a European and global context Resists the Cold War classification of Eastern European cinemas as "other" art cinemas by reconnecting them with the main circulation of film studies Includes discussion of such films as Taxidermia , El Perro Negro , 12:08 East of Bucharest Big TÕll , and Breakfast on the Grass and explores the work of directors including TamÁs AlmÁsi, Walerian Borowczyk, Roman Polanski, Jerzy Skolimowski, Andrzej ?u'awski, and Karel Vachek amongst many others
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title showcases 25 essays written by established and emerging film scholars that trace the history of Eastern European cinemas and offer an up-to-date assessment of post-socialist film cultures.
Table of Contents
Notes on the Editor and Contributorsp. viii
Forewordp. xv
Introduction: Eastern European Cinema From No End to the End (As We Know It)p. 1
New Theoretical and Critical Frameworksp. 23
Body Horror and Post-Socialist Cinema: György Pálfi's Taxidermiap. 25
El perro negro: Transnational Readings of Database Documentaries from Spainp. 41
Did Somebody Say Communism in the Classroom? or The Value of Analyzing Totality in Recent Serbian Cinemap. 63
Laughing into an Abyss: Cinema and Balkanizationp. 77
Jewish Identities and Generational Perspectivesp. 101
Aftereffects of 1989: Corneliu Porumboiu's 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) and Romanian Cinemap. 125
Cinema Beyond Borders: Slovenian Cinema in a World Contextp. 148
Historical and Spatial Redefinitionsp. 167
Center and Periphery, or How Karel Vachek Formed a New Governmentp. 169
The Polish Black Series Documentary and the British Free Cinema Movementp. 183
Socialists in Outer Space: East German Film's Venusian Adventurep. 201
Red Shift: New Albanian Cinema and its Dialogue with the Oldp. 224
National Space, (Trans)National Cinema: Estonian Film in the 1960sp. 244
For the Peace, For a New Man, For a Better World! Italian Leftist Culture and Czechoslovak Cinema, 1945-1968p. 265
Asethetic (Re)visionsp. 289
The Impossible Polish New Wave and its Accursed Émigré Auteurs: Borowczyk, Polanski, Skolimowski, and Zulawskip. 291
Documentary and Industrial Decline in Hungary: The "Ózd Series" of Tamás Almásip. 311
Investigating the Past, Envisioning the Future: An Exploration of Post-1991 Latvian Documentaryp. 325
Eastern European Historical Epics: Genre Cinema and the Visualization of a Heroic National Pastp. 344
Nation, Gender, and History in Latvian Genre Cinemap. 366
A Comparative Study: Rein Raamat's Big Toll and Priit Pärn's Luncheon on the Grassp. 385
The Yugoslav Black Wave: The History and Poetics of Polemical Cinema in the 1960s and 1970s in Yugoslaviap. 403
Industries and Institutionsp. 425
Follow the Money - Financing Contemporary Cinema in Romaniap. 427
An Alternative Model of Film Production: Film Units in Poland after World War Twop. 453
The Hussite Heritage Film: A Dream for all Czech Seasonsp. 466
International Co-productions as Productions of Heterotopiasp. 483
East is East? New Turkish Cinema and Eastern Europep. 504
Indexp. 518
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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