Catalogue


Historical literatures : writing about the past in England, 1660-1740 /
Noelle Gallagher.
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2012.
description
xx, 252 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719087627 (hbk.), 9780719087622 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2012.
isbn
0719087627 (hbk.)
9780719087622 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8700039
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [227]-247) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Noelle Gallagher is Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century British Literature at the University of Manchester.
Summaries
Main Description
Historical literatures surveys some of the many different genres in which Restoration and early-eighteenth-century writers depicted the past. Reading texts by Marvell, Dryden, Defoe and others, it argues that writers using 'minor' or 'literary' forms worked alongside the period's historians to formulate new ways of representing social and cultural history, politico-military events, and individual lives. Book jacket.
Main Description
Historical literatures recovers a rich, vibrant and complex tradition of Restoration and early-eighteenth century English historical writing. Highlighting the wide variety of historical works being printed and read in England between the years of 1660 and 1740, it demonstrates that many of the genres that we now view primarily as literary-verse satire and panegyric, memoir, scandal and chronicle-were also being used to represent historical phenomena. In surveying some of this period's 'historical literatures', it argues that many satirists, secret historians and memoirists made their choice of historical subject matter a topic of explicit commentary, presenting themselves as historians or inscribing their works in an English historical tradition. By responding to other varieties of history in this self-conscious way, writers like Andrew Marvell, John Dryden, Delarivier Manley, Daniel Defoe and John Evelyn were able to pioneer influential new techniques for representing their nation's past.
Main Description
Historical Literatures recovers a rich, vibrant, and complex tradition of Restoration and early-eighteenth century English historical writing. Highlighting the wide variety of historical works being printed and read in England between the years of 1660 and 1740, it demonstrates that many of the genres that we now view primarily as literaryverse satire and panegyric, memoir, scandal and chroniclewere also being used to represent historical phenomena. In surveying some of this period's "historical literatures," it argues that many satirists, secret historians, and memoirist made their choice of historical subject matter a topic of explicit commentary, presenting themselves as historians or inscribing their works in an English historical tradition. By responding to other varieties of history in this self-conscious way, writers like Andrew Marvell, John Dryden, Delarivier Manley, Daniel Defoe, and John Evelyn were able to pioneer influential new techniques for representing their nation's past.
Long Description
'I have called my poem historical, not epic,' John Dryden explained in the dedication to his panegyric Annus Mirabilis, 'though both the actions and actors are as much heroic, as any poem can contain.'While it's unlikely that any critic today would class Annus Mirabilis with Paradise Lost and the Iliad, it seems remarkable that the poem's other purpose-its role as 'an historical poem'-has so sharply receded from view. Historical Literatures recovers the forgotten historiographical element in works like Dryden's, surveying some of the many different forms in which Restoration and early-eighteenth-century writers represented their nation's past. In the process, it reveals that many of the genres we now view primarily as 'literary'-verse satire and panegyric, memoir, scandal chronicle-were also being used to represent historical phenomena. Like Dryden, many Restoration and early-eighteenth-century writers made their choice of historical subject matter into an explicit topic for discussion, presenting themselves as historians or describing their works as contributions to an English historical tradition. Working outside the boundaries of formal historical narrative, writers like Andrew Marvell, Daniel Defoe, Delarivier Manley and John Evelyn were able to develop new techniques for representing the past, ultimately changing the way that their contemporaries understood recent history and the history of the individual.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Highlighting the wide variety of historical works being printed and read in England between the years of 1660 and 1740, it demonstrates that many of the genres that we now view primarily as literary - verse satire and panegyric, memoir, scandal and chronicle - were also being used to represent historical phenomena.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xix
Introduction: English historiography at its 'lowest ebb'p. 1
Memoirp. 13
Memoirs and the history of the individualp. 15
Apostrophe: Colley Cibber's Apology and the development of social historyp. 26
Analogy: John Evelyn's Kalendarium and the public diary traditionp. 41
Secret historyp. 63
Secret histories as historiesp. 65
Narrative voices: Daniel Defoe's Secret History of the White-Staff in dialoguep. 75
Narrative personae: Delarivier Manley's Secret Memoirs and Manners and the modern chroniclep. 94
Satire and panegyricp. 111
Satire and panegyric as forms of historical writingp. 113
Metonymy: Edmund Waller, Andrew Marvell, and the advice-to-a-painter poemp. 123
Metaphor: John Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel and historical allegoryp. 142
History reconsideredp. 157
Rethinking history at its 'lowest ebb'p. 159
Secret history and Roger North's 'historical controversy'p. 162
History with a 'design: satire and John Oldmixon's History of England During the Reigns of the Royal House of Stuartp. 176
Notesp. 191
Bibliographyp. 227
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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