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Turncoats and renegadoes : changing sides during the English civil wars /
Andrew Hopper.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
258 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199575851 (hbk.), 9780199575855 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199575851 (hbk.)
9780199575855 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8700034
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [228]-244) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Hopper investigates the implementation of military justice, along with the theatre of retribution surrounding the trial and execution of turncoats. He concludes by arguing that, far from side-changing being the dubious practice of a handful of aberrant individuals, it became a necessary survival strategy for thousands as they navigated their way through such rapidly changing events. He reveals how side-changing shaped the course of the English Revolution, even contributing to the regicide itself, and remained an important political legacy to the English-speaking peoples thereafter.
Reviews
Review Quotes
A painstaking exploration of social, cultural, political, chronological and regional patterns and attitudes in and to a phenomenon conditioned by the changing tides of war, opportunism and the pressing weight of external pressures.
By combining high-level storytelling with a thoroughness and shrewdness of judgment, it is a work that is more than the sum of its parts.
Turncoats and Renegadoes is an important and sensitive study of an issue that has been critically absent from the ongoing debate on allegiance and political culture in the English Civil War period.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a dedicated study of the practice of changing sides during the English Civil Wars. It reveals how side-changing shaped the course of the English Revolution, even contributing to the regicide itself, and remained an important political legacy to the English speaking peoples thereafter.
Main Description
Turncoats and Renegadoes is the first dedicated study of the practice of changing sides during the English Civil Wars. It examines the extent and significance of side-changing in England and Wales, and includes comparative material from Scotland and Ireland.
Main Description
Turncoats and Renegadoes is the first dedicated study of the practice of changing sides during the English Civil Wars. It examines the extent and significance of side-changing in England and Wales but also includes comparative material from Scotland and Ireland. The first half identifies side-changers among peers, MPs, army officers, and common soldiers, before reconstructing the chronological and regional patterns to their defections. The second half delivers a cultural history of treachery, by adopting a thematic approach to explore the social andcultural implications of defections, and demonstrating how notions of what constituted a turncoat were culturally constructed. Side-changing came to dominate strategy on both sides at the highest levels. Both sides reviled, yet sought to take advantage of the practice, whilst allegations oftreachery came to dominate the internal politics of royalists and parliamentarians alike. The language applied to 'turncoats and renegadoes' in contemporary print is discussed and contrasted with the self-justifications of the side-changers themselves as they sought to shape an honourable self-imagefor their families and posterity. Andrew Hopper investigates the implementation of military justice, along with the theatre of retribution surrounding the trial and execution of turncoats. He concludes by arguing that, far from side-changing being the dubious practice of a handful of aberrant individuals, it became a necessarysurvival strategy for thousands as they navigated their way through such rapidly changing events. He reveals how side-changing shaped the course of the English Revolution, even contributing to the regicide itself, and remained an important political legacy to the English speaking peoplesthereafter.
Main Description
Turncoats and Renegadoesis the first dedicated study of the practice of changing sides during the English Civil Wars. It examines the extent and significance of side-changing in England and Wales but also includes comparative material from Scotland and Ireland. The first half identifies side-changers among peers, MPs, army officers, and common soldiers, before reconstructing the chronological and regional patterns to their defections. The second half delivers a cultural history of treachery, by adopting a thematic approach to explore the social and cultural implications of defections, and demonstrating how notions of what constituted a turncoat were culturally constructed. Side-changing came to dominate strategy on both sides at the highest levels. Both sides reviled, yet sought to take advantage of the practice, whilst allegations of treachery came to dominate the internal politics of royalists and parliamentarians alike. The language applied to 'turncoats and renegadoes' in contemporary print is discussed and contrasted with the self-justifications of the side-changers themselves as they sought to shape an honourable self-image for their families and posterity. Andrew Hopper investigates the implementation of military justice, along with the theatre of retribution surrounding the trial and execution of turncoats. He concludes by arguing that, far from side-changing being the dubious practice of a handful of aberrant individuals, it became a necessary survival strategy for thousands as they navigated their way through such rapidly changing events. He reveals how side-changing shaped the course of the English Revolution, even contributing to the regicide itself, and remained an important political legacy to the English speaking peoples thereafter.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. x
Abbreviationsp. xi
Note to the readerp. xii
Introductionp. 1
A Profile of Side-Changing in England and Wales, 1642-1646
A turncoat aristocracyp. 19
'Ambi-dexter' MPsp. 42
Military professionals: 'renegado' army officersp. 61
Popular allegiance and side-changing among rank-and-file soldiersp. 78
Chronological and regional patterns to side-changingp. 100
A Cultural History of Side-Changing
Political oath-taking and the fear of treacheryp. 121
The language of treachery in newsbooks and polemicp. 141
Honour, reputation, and the self-fashioning of elite side-changersp. 157
Trial and execution: defectors and military justicep. 179
Conclusionp. 207
Epiloguep. 216
Defectors from the House of Commons at Westminsterp. 224
MP defectors from the kingp. 225
Officer defectors from the army of the earl of Essex, 1642-45p. 226
Bibliographyp. 228
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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